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  • Wheels Of Fire (Awaiting Repress) Wheels Of Fire (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

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    Wheels Of Fire (Awaiting Repress)

    Wheels of Fire is a 1968 double album by the British rock band Cream, consisting of a studio and a live record. It reached #3 in the United Kingdom and #1 in the United States, becoming the first platinum-selling double album.
    LP1
    1. White Room
    2. Sitting on Top of the World
    3. Passing the Time
    4. As You Said
    5. Pressed Rat and Warthog
    6. Politician
    7. Those Were the Days
    8. Born Under a Bad Sign
    9. Deserted Cities of the Heart


    LP2
    1. Crossroads
    2. Spoonful
    3. Traintime 4
    4. Toad

    Cream
    $34.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress) The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $31.99
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    The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress)

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like "Death Rider," "The Beast Within," and "Raise The Dead" already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby "Blitz" Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.


    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.


    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. "It just makes sense for us," reflects D.D. "If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing "Grinder," the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work."


    "One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time," seconds Blitz. "Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics."


    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in "Come Heavy" and Iron Maiden in "The Long Road" and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.


    "Punk is huge for Overkill," confirms Verni. "And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world."


    Central to that premise is the incendiary "Let's All Go to Hades" which is sure to become a pit favourite. "This one was a hell of a lot of fun," says Blitz. "You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more."


    Adds D.D., "It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes."


    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is "Our Finest Hour." "It's about the recognition of sameness," explains Ellsworth. "I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune."


    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like "The Long Road." D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. "Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.


    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on "Our Finest Hour," is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.


    "I've had that kind of sound now for a long time," says Verni. "There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars."


    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. "Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds."


    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.


    "That's the strength of the band," explains Blitz. "Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization."


    And Ron? "He's one-of-a-kind," says Verni. "He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it."


    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.


    "I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.


    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.


    "For sure," says Blitz. "One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear."

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) (Pre-Order) The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) (Pre-Order) Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) (Pre-Order)

    Pressed On Yellow And Black Vinyl

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like Death Rider, The Beast Within, and Raise The Dead already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby Blitz Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.

    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.

    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. It just makes sense for us, reflects D.D. If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing Grinder, the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work.

    One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time, seconds Blitz. Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics.

    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in Come Heavy and Iron Maiden in The Long Road and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.

    Punk is huge for Overkill, confirms Verni. And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world.

    Central to that premise is the incendiary Let's All Go to Hades which is sure to become a pit favourite. This one was a hell of a lot of fun, says Blitz. You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more.

    Adds D.D., It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes.

    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is Our Finest Hour. It's about the recognition of sameness, explains Ellsworth. I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune.

    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like The Long Road. D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.

    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on Our Finest Hour, is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.

    I've had that kind of sound now for a long time, says Verni. There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars.

    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds.

    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.

    That's the strength of the band, explains Blitz. Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization.

    And Ron? He's one-of-a-kind, says Verni. He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it.

    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.

    I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.

    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.

    For sure, says Blitz. One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear.

    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed PRE-ORDER Buy Now
  • I'm Turning Into You I'm Turning Into You Quick View

    $4.99
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    I'm Turning Into You

    1. Turning Into You
    2. Metal Mandy
    3. She Wanna Know
    4. Two Time Loser
    Wheels Of Fire
    $4.99
    Vinyl LP 7 Single - Sealed Buy Now
  • Black Light Syndrome (Awaiting Repress) Black Light Syndrome (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $26.99
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    Black Light Syndrome (Awaiting Repress)

    This power trio has famous roots, and they've brought it all together masterfully. First cut The Sun Road starts off like a tune off of David Gilmour's first solo album and then vanishes into a driving, power-chorded surge of soulful rock. Next, Dark Corners is a massive rocker that pulls you under its powerful whirlpool of guitar/bass/drum frenzy. Stevens tortures the guitar into absolute submission without any predictable riffs. Levin looms everywhere, and Bozzio flows in a polyrhythmic jungle. Fine interactive tension and execution everywhere. This goes way beyond King Crimson's Red days.


    Duende opens with flamenco guitar firebursts, and slowly builds into a decent Spanish-flavored piece. Not my favorite, but well done. The title cut, Black Light Syndrome, is obviously a play on Bozzio Levin Stevens. It is a slower-paced dirge and filled to the brim with a variety of well-executed riffs, basslines, and drum tech.
    Falling in Circles is an early Floydscape dotted with Ronnie Montrose leads, a ballad of driving determination and resolve. Floods of Satriani, Wishbone Ash, Alvin Lee, Fripp, Buck Dharma, and even that Duane Allman tone.


    Book of Hours took me right back to Wheels of Fire's Pressed Rat and Warthog, rainy-day dreamy afternoons with a fresh pot of designer coffee. Levin, Bozzio, and Stevens play off of one another precisely as one mind.


    On the last cut, Chaos/Control, you hear that E7 breakdown from Hendrix's Midnight on War Heroes, and then a jazzy boogie in classic Frank Marino style is laid down. Stevens is a guitarist with a wide range of dynamics.


    - John W. Patterson (All Music Guide)

    1. The Sun Road
    2. Dark Corners
    3. Duende
    4. Black Light Syndrome
    5. Falling in Circles
    6. Book of Hours
    7. Chaos / Control
    Bozzio Levin Stevens
    $26.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Music From Big Pink (On Sale) Music From Big Pink (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $34.99 $31.49 Save $3.50 (10%)

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    Music From Big Pink (On Sale)

    Ranked 34/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.


    Take a Load Off with the Very Best-Sounding Analog Big Pink Ever Pressed


    Half-Speed Mastered from the Original Master Tapes and Pressed at RTI


    Includes The Weight, I Shall Be Released, This Wheel's On Fire


    Youve likely heard the story. Now hear the results of one of the most famous sessions in history with a clarity and warmth never thought possible.


    In late 1965 and early 1966, Bob Dylan shattered the boundaries between folk and rock music on a controversial tour that found the generation spokesman plugging in and shocking purist audiences that reviled in horror at the sight of their hero playing electric with a bunch of ragtag Canadian mates. Then known as the Hawks, the Band was that backing group, serving Dylan not only on the road but, playing with him after his motorcycle accident, on his seminal Basement Tapes collection.


    Recorded in 1968 and ranked #34 on Rolling Stones 500 Greatest Albums of All Time list, The Bands Music From Big Pink stems from the same localea pink farmhouse in upstate Woodstock, New Yorkas the Basement Tapes and is just as rustic, timeless, and mysterious as Dylans celebrated work. A debut for the ages, the album features two songs co-written with DylanThis Wheels on Fire, Tears of Rageas well as whats universally recognized as the definitive version of Dylans I Shall Be Released. More famously, it also includes The Weight, a standard covered by everyone from the Grateful Dead to Weezer to Aretha Franklin. But the power of this set doesnt lie in one song but the entire album.


    A groundbreaking statement, Music From Big Pink lays bare the magnetism of the American South, Appalachian traditions, and country-rock innovations. That guitarist Robbie Robertson, pianist Garth Hudson, bassist Rick Danko, drummer/vocalist Levon Helm, and organist Richard Manuel are all household names only adds to the proof of this must-have records everlasting appeal. This is the majesty of what Greil Marcus called the old, weird America.


    Half-speed mastered from the original master tapes and pressed at RTI, Mobile Fidelity's analog version practically gives you a spot on the floor at Big Pink as the sessions went down. Curl up, close your eyes, and listen as the music's sublimely organic sounds appear with full-range dynamics, life-size imaging, and tremendous soundstaging. This is one of the reasons why you have a turntable. Prepare for your system, and your ears, to glow.


    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Tears Of Rage
    2. To Kingdom Come
    3. In A Station
    4. Caledonia Mission
    5. The Weight
    6. We Can Talk
    7. Long Black Veil
    8. Chest Fever
    9. Lonesome Suzie
    10. This Wheel's On Fire
    11. I Shall Be Released
    The Band
    $34.99 $31.49 Save $3.50 (10%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Boston Tea Party: New England Broadcast 1969 The Boston Tea Party: New England Broadcast 1969 Quick View

    $37.99
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    The Boston Tea Party: New England Broadcast 1969

    Live At The Boston Tea Party - Boston, MA - On February 22nd, 1969

    Limited To 500 Copies

    Shortly before the release of Dr. Byrds & Mr. Hyde (1969), The Byrds performed at the Boston Tea Party, a music venue in the heart of Boston renowned for performances by The Grateful Dead, The Velvet Underground, and The Byrds themselves. The performance, now available on this deluxe LP release, is from an FM broadcast recorded at the club on February 22nd, 1969. Available here for the first time on vinyl, the set includes a brace of cuts from the new album alongside 4 from its follow-up, The Ballad Of Easy Rider. Elsewhere we find strong covers of The Band's 'Long Black Veil' and 'This Wheel's On Fire,' Bob Dylan's 'Lay Lady Lay,' and a great selection of oldies - although not the obvious choices.

    LP 1
    1. You Ain't Going Nowhere
    2. He Was A Friend Of Mine
    3. Old Blue
    4. Long Black Veil
    5. Goin' Back
    6. Get Out Of My Life Woman
    7. The Ballad Of Easy Rider
    8. Jesus Is Just Alright


    LP 2
    1. Tulsa County
    2. Mr. Spaceman
    3. Sing Me Back Home
    4. This Wheel's On Fire
    5. Lay Lady Lay
    6. Time Between
    7. Take A City Bride
    8. It's All Over Now, Baby Blue
    9. Come Back Baby

    The Byrds
    $37.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Dr. Byrds & Mr. Hyde Dr. Byrds & Mr. Hyde Quick View

    $28.99
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    Dr. Byrds & Mr. Hyde

    A key transitional touchstone in The Byrds' fabled canon, 1969's Dr. Byrds & Mr. Hyde
    was the next stop in the band's pioneering country-rock trajectory and the first album by
    the post-Gram Parsons lineup. With leader Roger McGuinn at the helm of a stellar new
    edition of the band featuring guitar god Clarence White, drummer Gene Parsons, and
    bassist John York, Dr. Byrds & Mr. Hyde sees The Byrds bridging the gap between the
    psychedelic flights of the group's mid-'60s albums and the down-home, country-based
    style developed only months earlier with Sweetheart of the Rodeo.


    In addition to containing strong McGuinn originals (King Apathy III, Old Blue),
    more of the band's beloved interpretations of Bob Dylan classics (This Wheel's on Fire
    and a medley blending The Bard's My Back Pages' with Jimmy Reed's Baby, What You
    Want Me to Do), and even a Gram Parsons collaboration (the bemusing Drug Store
    Truck Drivin' Man, which cleverly celebrates The Byrds' love of country music while
    simultaneously taking a dig at small-minded rednecks), Dr. Byrds & Mr. Hyde also boasts
    two tracks composed by McGuinn for the obscure, racy '60s cult movie Candy.


    Mastered from the original Columbia Records analog master reels, Sundazed's exact
    reproduction of the original LP will have Byrdmaniacs everywhere soaring to high heaven!

    1. This Wheel's On Fire
    2. Old Blue
    3. Your Gentle Way Of Loving Me
    4. Child Of The Universe
    5. Nashville West
    6. Drug Store Truck Drivin' Man
    7. King Apathy III
    8. Candy
    9. Bad Night At The Whiskey
    10. Medley:
    11. My Back Pages

    12. B.J. Blues

    13. Baby, What Do You Want Me To Do
    The Byrds
    $28.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Basement Tapes (On Sale) The Basement Tapes (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $49.99 $44.99 Save $5.00 (10%)

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    The Basement Tapes (On Sale)

    Ranked 291/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.


    Recorded in Basement of Big Pink with The Band: Modern Americana Starts Here


    Audiophile Sound at Last: Sonic Subtleties, Loose Interplay, Organic Spirit, Warm Textures Presented Like Never Before on Definitive Mobile Fidelity Reissue


    Dylan at His Most Humorous, Unguarded, Loose: Folk Tales, Weird Narratives, Rock Ballads, Inside Jokes, Allusions Pepper Alchemic Material


    Includes This Wheels on Fire, You Aint Goin Nowhere, Tears of Rage, Million Dollar Bash, Yazoo Street Scandal


    The Freewheelin Bob Dylan, Another Side of Bob Dylan, Bringing It All Back Home, Blonde on Blonde, and Blood on the Tracks Also Available from Mobile Fidelity


    Basements have long been associated with raw, off-the-cuff rock n roll, the damp and dark spaces serving as the woodshedding venues for countless bands. Yet no basement is more famous, and none yielded music as familiarly weird, wholesomely American, joyously loose, and identifiably humorous as that in the upstate New York house dubbed Big Pink the location where, during the summer and early fall of 1967, Bob Dylan and The Band played a vivid tapestry of covers, originals, and traditionals that signaled the advent of Americana. Once again, the Bard changed the world.


    As part of its Bob Dylan catalog restoration series, Mobile Fidelity is thoroughly humbled to have the privilege of mastering the iconic LP from the original master tapes and pressing it on dead-quiet LPs at RTI. The end result is the very finest, most transparent analog edition of The Basement Tapes ever produced and the first-ever analog reissue. Inimitable, the particulars of The Basement Tapes especially, the gather-round-in-a-huddle assembly of the instrumentalists, home-made character, domestic vibe, and low-volume nature of the recordings come to fore here in a manner that takes the listener down the stairs at 2188 Stoll Road and brings the images of Dylan, Rick Danko, Robbie Robertson, and Co. to life.


    Fresh off experiencing a motorcycle accident and the wrath of audiences hostile to his embrace of amplified music, Dylan elected to retreat to the comforts of rural and family life. He soon began collaborating with members of the Band in his house, ultimately moving the sessions to Big Pink. Informal, peaceful, relaxed, open-minded: The collaborations blanket country stomps, roots hootenannies, forgotten spirituals, earthy originals, chaotic marches, dreamscapes, dance tunes, folk laments, catch-as-you-can improvisations. On The Basement Tapes, mythical ghosts and dead legends reappear, reveling in the absurdity, comedy, mystery, aura, and alchemy.


    In Invisible Republic, his scintillating book about the sessions, cultural critic Greil Marcus states: At a time when the country was tearing itself apart in a war at home over a war abroad, the music was funny and comforting; it was also strange, and somehow incomplete. Out of some odd displacement of art and time, the music seemed both transparent and inexplicable when it was first heard, and it still does. Indeed, The Basement Tapes appear to emanate from an indefinable chasm between modern and ancient, self-evident and mysterious, shapeless and fully formed, abstract and concrete, histories unwritten and chronicled. But every note chimes with freenessa liberating fun, humble simplicity, and bond-creating camaraderie felt in every hoot, holler, laugh, and false start.


    The Basement Tapes capacity to remain so gloriously honest and timeless performances that genuinely could've been made today, ten years from now, or back in the 1930's helps account for their emotional resonance and unsurpassed reputation as a snapshot of how unencumbered American music, and art with deep historical roots and connective cultural tissues, is supposed to sound.


    Mobile Fidelity's reissue squares away the late-night bleariness, jovial atmosphere, low-ceiling dimensions, and ensemble-based perspective of the sessions, allowing the listener to become Hamlet, the dog who slept nearby Dylan, Robertson, and Co. as it all went down. This is not to be missed.


    Given the sonic and artistic merit of this album, we anticipate huge demand.


    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Odds and Ends
    2. Orange Juice Blues (Blues for Breakfast)
    3. Million Dollar Bash
    4. Yazoo Street Scandal
    5. Goin to Acapulco
    6. Katies Been Gone
    7. Lo and Behold
    8. Bessie Smith
    9. Clothes Line Saga
    10. Apple Suckling Tree
    11. Please Mrs. Henry
    12. Tears of Rage
    13. Too Much of Nothing
    14. Yea! Heavy and a Bottle of Bread
    15. Aint No More Cane
    16. Crash on the Levee (Down in the Flood)
    17. Ruben Remus
    18. Tiny Montgomery
    19. You Aint Goin Nowhere
    20. Dont Ya Tell Henry
    21. Nothing Was Delivered
    22. Open the Door, Homer
    23. Long Distance Operator
    24. This Wheels on Fire
    Bob Dylan and the Band
    $49.99 $44.99 Save $5.00 (10%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Lost On The River Lost On The River Quick View

    $29.99
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    Lost On The River

    The New Basement Tapes, an album project from Elvis Costello, Rhiannon Giddens (Carolina Chocolate Drops) Taylor Goldsmith (Dawes), Jim James (My Morning Jacket), Marcus Mumford (Mumford & Sons) and producer T Bone Burnett, recorded in Capitol Studios to create music for two-dozen recently discovered lyrics written by Bob Dylan in 1967 during the period that generated the recording of the legendary Basement Tapes.


    The album will be released this year by Electromagnetic Recordings/Harvest Records (Capitol Music Group), and will be accompanied by a Showtime documentary titled, Lost Songs: The Basement Tapes Continued, directed by Sam Jones (the Wilco documentary, I Am Trying To Break Your Heart). The film will present an exclusive and intimate look at the making of Lost On The River: The New Basement Tapes set against the important and historical cultural backdrop of Bob Dylan's original Basement Tapes.


    Bob Dylan's original Basement Tapes - recorded by Dylan in 1967 with musicians who would later achieve their own fame as The Band - have fascinated and enticed successive generations of musicians, fans and cultural critics for nearly five decades. This collective recorded more than a hundred songs in
    the basement of a small house in upstate New York that summer and fall, including dozens of newly-written Bob Dylan future classics such as, "I Shall Be Released," "The Mighty Quinn," "This Wheel's On Fire," "You Ain't Going Nowhere" and "Tears Of Rage."


    Lost On The River: The New Basement Tapes celebrates the discovery of new Bob Dylan lyrics from that noted 1967 period and marks a unique creative opportunity for Burnett, Costello, Giddens, Goldsmith, James and Mumford, who are bringing them to life nearly 50 years later. For Burnett, whom Dylan
    has entrusted with this endeavor, it was imperative to provide an environment in which these artists could thrive. "Great music is best created when a community of artists gets together for the common good. There is a deep well of generosity and support in the room at all times, and that reflects the tremendous generosity shown by Bob in sharing these lyrics with us."

    1. Down On The Bottom
    2. Married To My Hack
    3. Kansas Cit
    4. Spanish Mary
    5. Liberty Street
    6. Nothing To It
    7. When I Get My Hands On You
    8. Duncan and Jimmy
    9. Lost On The River
    10. Florida Key
    11. Hidee Hidee Ho
    12. Stranger
    13. Card Shark
    14. Six Months In Kansas City (Liberty Street)
    15. Lost On The River
    The New Basement Tapes
    $29.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Fain Fain Quick View

    $17.99
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    Fain

    Recorded in a beautiful and isolated house in the Yorkshire Dales, Fain is the sound of a band at the peak of their creative powers. It's an honest and natural album that allows its stories, its melodies, its themes and structures to breathe. The album draws on more traditional English and Scottish folk melodies than anything they've done before, but not straying from the drop-out fuzz-rock route they've made their own, the influences are vast - British rock bands like Groundhogs, Dark, Mighty Baby and Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac are evident in the swirling and distorted guitars throughout Fain, along with the 60s revival folk of Fairport Convention, Nic Jones, and Trees. Additionally they have looked towards Scandinavian's rich psychedelic tradition both new and old - you can hear the likes of Mecki Mark Men, Mikael Ramel and contemporaries Dungen. You can even hear the band's teenage forays into Hip-Hop in the drums of 'Thief' and 'Athol'.


    It rained constantly throughout the recording process and the house was so packed with gear and recording equipment the band were forced to sleep in tents and caravans parked outside. Whilst performing, they could look out into the vast countryside and catch sight of buzzards, hares, curlews and hundreds upon hundreds of crows and gulls. The fire was on permanently, overnight and throughout the day. A serene experience that informs every track on the album. It was mixed and finished in the equally rainy London, with additional performances from Olivia Chaney on piano and backing vocals, plus Nic Kearey and Rachel Davies of Stick in the Wheel and Various (XL). Jace Lasek (Besnard Lakes) recorded backing vocals in Vancouver remotely for All Returns.


    As evidenced by the first single All Returns, Fain is more lyrically focused than anything they've previously recorded.. The song tells the story of a dream Jack Sharp (guitars/vocals) had during which an acquaintance had looked into his eyes and seen into his soul whilst calmly describing his faults and inner demons, a truly cathartic experience. However, says Sharp, his life is largely too banal for material and he largely draws upon snapshots of history to furnish him with the ideas for lyrics. Stand out track Thief is taken from various stories of highwaymen that had been made famous by broadsheet ballads and plays - the likes of Charles Peace, William Nevison, Jonathan Wild and Jack Sheppard. He delivers this story in first person, almost as if he is playing the part of a complete degenerate with little or no conscience or morals. As Sharp says, It's like a form of tourism. You can visit but not live in the mind of an appalling human being.

    Empty Vessels
    All Returns
    When the Fire is Dead in the Grate
    Athol
    Hesperus
    Answer
    Thief
    NRR
    Wolf People
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Handwritten Handwritten Quick View

    $24.99
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    Handwritten


    Blue Colored Vinyl


    The late Nashville songwriter Harlan Howard famously defined the ingredients of a great song as three chords and the truth. Every songwriter knows three chords, but laying bare the truth? Now that can be an altogether trickier affair. In January of 2012, The Gaslight Anthem piled into their old tour van and headed across the New Jersey state line for a 14 hour road trip to Nashville on their own quest for the truth. Their destination was 2806 Azalea Place, Nashville, Blackbird Studio, where the New Brunswick quartet had booked five weeks recording time with producer Brendan O'Brien (Bruce Springsteen, Pearl Jam, AC/DC). Their mission: to reconnect with rock 'n' roll in its most feral, pure, stripped-raw form.


    Brian Fallon was thirteen years old when he discovered The Clash's self-titled debut album in the racks of Sound Effects Records in Hackettstown, New Jersey: the owner of the store promised the young teenager that the record would change his life. He wasn't wrong. But there was a time, not so very long ago, when The Gaslight's Anthem frontman had grown weary of the sound of electric guitars. After three albums of soulful, impassioned, hearts-on-fire punk rock, Sink Or Swim (2007), The '59 Sound (2008) and American Slang (2010), Fallon needed a change of pace, a change of scenery.


    And so, in January of 2011, together with TGA guitar tech Ian Perkins, he formed The Horrible Crowes, a darkly melancholic side-project inspired by his love of The Afghan Whigs, Tom Waits and PJ Harvey. After the band's acclaimed debut album Elsie dropped in September, Fallon joined fellow punk rock troubadours Chuck Ragan, Dan Andriano (Alkaline Trio) and Dave Hause (The Loved Ones) on the acoustic Revival Tour, airing stripped-down versions of Gaslight Anthem and Horrible Crowes songs to packed rooms across Europe. And then he returned home to New Jersey and Gaslight, re-energized, renewed and ready to make a full-tilt rock 'n' roll record again.


    After six weeks of that there's nothing you want to hear more than a Marshall stack turned all the way up, he says with a laugh. The result is Handwritten, the most committed, affecting and compelling album of The Gaslight Anthem's career to date. Introduced by muscular lead-off single 45, which received it's world premiere on BBC Radio 1 as Zane Lowe's Hottest Record In The World on April 30, it finds the Jersey boys in inspired form, decanting '60's soul, '70's stadium rock, '80s hardcore and '90's grunge into eleven white-knuckle, blue-collar everyman anthems. Fallon likens its incandescent electrical storms to Tom Petty songs (being) played by Pearl Jam. Put more simply, it's a supercharged American rock 'n' roll classic.


    We've taken everything we do and gone to 10 with it, explains Fallon. This is definitely the Gaslight Anthem record I would want next, if I were a fan. American Slang was cool, but this sounds like a band who has plugged back into the electric socket again. I think these songs are the closest thing to what we should have always sounded like, adds guitarist Alex Rosamilia. We just hadn't figured out yet how to play it right.


    Fallon credits Brendan O'Brien for capturing the raw, live-off-the-floor feel of Handwritten. Fine-tuned in the living room of the small rental house the band shared in Nashville, its eleven tracks were recorded with the whole band eyeball-to-eyeball in one room at Blackbird, vibing off one another's energy. The electricity in the recordings is tangible. Brendan taught us a ton about songwriting and recording as a band, Fallon notes. The whole experience was amazing. That's the guy that recorded Pearl Jam, that's the guy that recorded Bruce Springsteen, that's the guy that did Rage Against The Machine; and that's the guy you want to say 'It's good', because when he says it's good, that's when it's good.


    The purity of O'Brien's stark, unadorned recording process served to inspire Fallon's approach to the lyrical themes on Handwritten too. Where previous Gaslight Anthem albums evoked deathless images of Americana, all Cadillacs, jukeboxes, Ferris wheels and wistful, romanticized vignettes of star-struck lovers disappearing into the great wide open, Handwritten is rooted in Fallon's own experiences, lending the record a more immediate, emotional edge. Now I am no angel but I got nothing to hide, the singer rasps on the brooding grunge-noir of Too Much Blood. Can you say the same thing for yourself tonight?


    It's supposed to be a letter to whoever is listening, says Fallon. Like, this is what we got beat up by and maybe you did too. There's so many things that I just never wrote about, real personal stuff that I just wasn't ready to talk about yet. Now I think being an adult I have some reflection on it. We wanted to look back on the music that we first found when we were in high school. The truth is, if you're my age, you were listening to Peal Jam and Nirvana and Soundgarden. When that music came out these were guys that we could relate to. They weren't the biggest bands in the world by accident.


    And it's no accident either that with Handwritten, the Gaslight Anthem themselves sound built to take on the world. After years paying their dues in the punk rock underground, their major label debut is assuredly the work of a young band who know their time is now. And their laidback, charismatic frontman is ready. I've always been ready for arenas, Fallon smiles. I've just been waiting for them to catch up to me. I want to play Giant Stadium, I always wanted to be a major label, major league band. If I can be the kid that's on the cover of Time magazine, I'll take it. And I'll buy you a drink while I'm at it.

    1. 45
    2. Handwritten
    3. Here Comes My Man
    4. Mulholland Drive
    5. Keepsake
    6. Too Much Blood
    7. Howl
    8. Biloxi Parish
    9. Desire
    10. Mae
    11. National Anthem
    Gaslight Anthem
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Basement Tapes Raw: The Bootleg Series Vol. 11 The Basement Tapes Raw: The Bootleg Series Vol. 11 Quick View

    $99.99
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    The Basement Tapes Raw: The Bootleg Series Vol. 11


    Special Deluxe LP-Set On 180-gram Vinyl


    Featuring 3 LPs Of 38 Highlights From Dylan's Legendary 1967 Sessions With The Band


    Compiled From Meticulously Restored Original Tapes


    Includes Exclusive 12x12'' Booklet With Extensive Liner Notes And Rare Photographs


    Also Includes All The Tracks On 2 CDs


    Compiled from meticulously restored original tapes - many found only recently - this three-LP set includes 38 highlights of Dylan's legendary 1967 recording sessions with members of his touring ensemble who would later achieve their own fame as The Band.


    Among Bob Dylan's many cultural milestones, the legendary Basement Tapes have long fascinated and enticed successive generations of musicians, fans and cultural critics alike. Having transformed music and culture during the early 1960s, Dylan reached unparalleled heights across 1965 and 1966 through the release of three historic albums, the groundbreaking watershed single ''Like A Rolling Stone,'' a controversial and legendary 'electric' performance at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival and wildly polarizing tours of the United States, Europe and the United Kingdom. Dylan's mercurial rise and prodigious outpouring of work during that decade came to an abrupt halt in July 1966 when he was reported to have been in a serious motorcycle accident in upstate New York.


    Recovering from his injuries and away from the public eye for the first time in years, Dylan ensconced himself, along with Robbie Robertson, Rick Danko, Richard Manuel, Garth Hudson and, later, Levon Helm, in the basement of a small house, dubbed ''Big Pink'' by the group, in West Saugerties, New York. This collective, which would come to be known as Bob Dylan and The Band, recorded more than a hundred songs over the next several months including traditional covers, wry and humorous ditties, off-the cuff performances and, most important, dozens of newly-written Bob Dylan songs, including future classics ''I Shall Be Released,'' ''The Mighty Quinn,'' ''This Wheel's On Fire'' and ''You Ain't Going Nowhere.''


    When rumors and rare acetates of some of these recordings began surfacing, it created a curiosity strong enough to fuel an entirely new segment of the music business: the bootleg record. In 1969, an album mysteriously titled Great White Wonder began showing up in record shops around the country, and Dylan's music from the summer of 1967 began seeping into the fabric of popular culture, penetrating the souls of music lovers everywhere. With each passing year, more and more fans sought out this rare contraband, desperate to hear this new music from the legendary Bob Dylan.


    The actual recordings, however, remained commercially unavailable until 1975, when Columbia Records released a scant 16 of them on The Basement Tapes album (that album also included eight new songs by The Band, without Dylan).


    A critical and popular success, The Basement Tapes went Top 10 in the US and UK, with John Rockwell, of The New York Times, calling it ''one of the greatest albums in the history of American popular music,'' Paul Nelson, in Rolling Stone, praising the tracks as ''the hardest, toughest, sweetest, saddest, funniest, wisest songs I know'' and the Washington Post noting that ''...Dylan has to rank as the single greatest artist modern American pop music has produced.'' Robert Christgau gave the album an A+ rating in the Village Voice, where it topped the annual Pazz & Jop Critics Poll.


    Musicians:

    Bob Dylan

    Robbie Robertson

    Rick Danko

    Richard Manuel

    Garth Hudson

    Levon Helm

    (Lead vocals are sung by Bob Dylan. Harmony and instrumentation are unknown because all involved were multi-instrumentalists and vocalists, and no records remain.)

    LP 1
    1. Open the Door, Homer (Restored version)
    2. Odds and Ends (Alternate version)
    3. Million Dollar Bash (Alternate version)
    4. One Too Many Mornings (Unreleased)
    5. I Don't Hurt Anymore (Unreleased) (written by Donald I Robertson and Walter E Rollins)
    6. Ain't No More Cane (Alternate version) (Traditional, arranged by Bob Dylan)
    7. Crash on the Levee (Restored version)
    8. Tears of Rage (Without overdubs) (written by Bob Dylan and Richard Manuel)
    9. Dress it up, Better Have it All (Unreleased)
    10. I'm Not There (Previously released)
    11. Johnny Todd (Unreleased) (Traditional, arranged by Bob Dylan)
    12. Too Much of Nothing (Alternate version)


    LP 2
    1. Quinn the Eskimo (Restored version)
    2. Get Your Rocks Off (Unreleased)
    3. Santa-Fe (Previously released)
    4. Silent Weekend (Unreleased)
    5. Clothes Line Saga (Restored version)
    6. Please, Mrs. Henry (Restored version)
    7. I Shall be Released (Restored version)
    8. You Ain't Goin' Nowhere (Alternate version)
    9. Lo and Behold! (Alternate version)
    10. Minstrel Boy (Previously released)
    11. Tiny Montgomery (Without overdubs)
    12. All You Have to do is Dream (Unreleased)
    13. Goin' to Acapulco (Without overdubs)
    14. 900 Miles from My Home (Unreleased) (Traditional, arranged by Bob Dylan)


    LP 3
    1. One for the Road (Unreleased)
    2. I'm Alright (Unreleased)
    3. Blowin' in the Wind (Unreleased)
    4. Apple Suckling Tree (Restored version)
    5. Nothing Was Delivered (Restored version)
    6. Folsom Prison Blues (Unreleased) (written by Johnny Cash)
    7. This Wheel's on Fire (Without overdubs) (written by Bob Dylan and Rick Danko)
    8. Yea! Heavy and a Bottle of Bread (Restored version)
    9. Don't Ya Tell Henry (Alternate version)
    10. Baby, Won't You be My Baby (Unreleased)
    11. Sign on the Cross (Unreleased)
    12. You Ain't Goin' Nowhere (Without overdubs)

    Bob Dylan
    $99.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP + 2 CD - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Melk En Honing Melk En Honing Quick View

    $22.99
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    Melk En Honing

    Author & Punisher s newest album entitled MELK EN HONING , produced by Phil Anselmo (Pantera, Down, Superjoint Ritual, and more) due out Summer 2015, is melange of his various drone machinery together, multiple physical rhythm machines, some synth and the new electromechanical masks that began to appear in A&P performances across the U.S. and Europe in 2014. After 2 years of heavy touring and festival appearances, the goal with this album became to try and capture the live dissonant power of the A&P experience. The combination of Anselmo s persistence, expertise and some of Shone s new experimentation with various vocal devices, this is a vocal-prominent, bass heavy album that combines A&P's signature elusive drone sequences and hard hitting rhythms with unexpected terrains of melody and musicality that sustain Shone's reputation as an unorthodox innovator in a class all of his own.


    Abandoning the typical guitar and drums set up, Author & Punisher makes aggressive rhythmic and oscillatory soundscapes from his own custom fabricated and precision machinery. Designed by Shone himself, the instruments of Author & Punisher are custom devices that begin mostly as big chunks of aluminum and steel that are worked into all manners of wheels, throttles, pedals, and masks to manipulate sound live. Shone s electromechanical arsenal and physical approach to live production become to heavy music what Survival Research Laboratories was to live, unscripted performance art. Pitchfork styled him immediate but mysterious, Stereogum described his chilling, unrecognizable form, and NPR hails him as a thrill [who] fires on all cylinders.

    Author & Punisher
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Where I've Been Where I've Been Quick View

    $21.99
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    Where I've Been

    "I think this is the best work we've ever done," explains JD & The Straight Shot founder and frontman Jim Dolan of the band's latest release, Where I've Been. "I'm so proud of the music that my band and I have put together. I believe in this album."


    Produced by Joe Walsh, Where I've Been features several breakthrough singles including "Governor's Song," which challenges some of today's most well-known political figures; "Under That Hood," a transformative single that tells the tragic story of Trayvon Martin; and "Hard to Find," which will be featured in the highly-anticipated film, St. Vincent, starring Bill Murray and Melissa McCarthy.


    Dolan's day gig is Cablevision Systems CEO and Executive Chairman of Madison Square Garden, where he also oversees New York sports teams such as the Knicks and the Rangers. Music is his passion.


    "I needed something in my life where I felt like I was actually creating," says Dolan. "Most of what I do as an executive is orchestrate. I don't actually set up cable and I don't really shoot hoops," he says, laughing. "Music is something I've played since I was a kid. It's me purely expressing myself."


    JD & The Straight Shot's creative nucleus is Dolan and guitarist Marc Copely (B.B. King), who pen all the band's music and lyrics. Instrumentally indispensable is guitarist Aidan Dolan; keyboardist Brian Mitchell (Bob Dylan, Levon Helm); and drummer Joe Magistro (The Black Crowes). Also part of the band are some of pop music's finest session players, bassist Zev Katz (Aretha Franklin, Elton John), and violinist Erin Slaver (Rod Stewart, Trace Adkins, Martina McBride).


    Dolan started JD & The Straight Shot in 2000. The band has recorded four previous albums: Midnight Run (2012), Can't Make Tears (2011), Right On Time (2008), and Nothing To Hide (2005) - as well as an EP, Daily News Blues (2010).


    The band's style is steeped in the quiet fire of Americana, with distinctive elements of the blues and mystical, rustic, New Orleans-flavored roots music - topped off with a dash of the classic rock of Dolan's youth.


    "I grew up on bands like the Allman Brothers," says Dolan. "We played those records until the grooves wore right off of them."


    JD & The Straight Shot has been covered by The New York Times, Billboard, and New York Magazine, among other publications, and performed on "Good Day New York." Their song "Can't Make Tears" is the theme song for AMC's TV show Hell on Wheels, and their music has been featured in many films, including the critically acclaimed August: Osage County.


    The group has opened for the Eagles on several tours, including the current "History of the Eagles" tour, the "Summer 2010" tour, and the band's stadium tour with the Dixie Chicks and Keith Urban. JD & The Straight Shot has also opened up for both Joe Walsh and Don Henley's solo tours, the James Gang reunion tour, and performed at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival and Austin City Limits.

    1. Palm Reader
    2. Where I've Been
    3. Hard To Find
    4. Under That Hood
    5. The Drift- PT 1
    6. Violet's Song
    7. Going Nowhere Good
    8. White Bird
    9. Girls Night Out
    10. Governor's Song
    11. History
    12. Fall From Grace
    13. The Drift- PT 2
    JD & The Straight Shot
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Gets Next To You Gets Next To You Quick View

    $16.99
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    Gets Next To You

    Born April 13, 1946 in Forest City, AR, Al Green began singing in his family's gospel group. His distinctive vocal talent and extraordinary ability to master pop, R&B, and gospel genres has enabled him to become an international superstar. Not only is he Hi Records' most awarded singer/songwriter, but in a phenomenal career spanning more than thirty years, he's charted six #1 hits and has been inducted into the prestigious Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame.


    Originally released in 1971, Al Green Get's Next To You was his first major release and it features a killer selection of raw Memphis soul. The formula for his string of subsequent hits is firmly in place and Al's beautiful voice is swept up wonderfully in the sympathetic production handled here by the great Willie Mitchell.


    It's hard to imagine how anyone could have come up with a better showcase for Al's amazing voice. Proof of this can be heard on the record's great Green originals All Because, I'm A Ram, You Say It and the classic Tired of Being Alone as well as on the covers like Driving Wheel, Can't Get Next To You and Light My Fire.

    1. I Can't Get Next To You
    2. Are You Lonely For Me Baby
    3. God Is Standing By
    4. Tired Of Being Alone
    5. I'm A Ram
    6. Driving Wheel
    7. Light My Fire
    8. You Say It
    9. Right Now, Right Now
    10. All Because
    Al Green
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Lee Jeans Living Rock Concert 1969 (Out Of Stock) Lee Jeans Living Rock Concert 1969 (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $32.99
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    Lee Jeans Living Rock Concert 1969 (Out Of Stock)

    This 1969 live radio broadcast from San Francisco's Fillmore West is augmented with four numbers recorded at the Bridges Auditorium in Claremont, CA in the same year. The group preview Dylan's 'This Wheel's On Fire' in a set that also includes 'Eight Miles High,' the 1966 song McGuinn composed with Gene Clark and David Crosby, which was rarely performed in this period of the band.
    1. Turn! Turn! Turn! (Live)
    2. Ballad of Easy Rider (Live)
    3. It Won't Be Wrong (Live)
    4. The Water Is Wide (Live)
    5. Mr. Tambourine Man (Live)
    6. Nashville West (Live)
    7. Lover of the Bayou (Live)
    8. Jesus Is Just Alright (At Fillmore West, June 15th, 1969)
    9. Jesus Is Just Alright (At the Bridges Auditorium, 1969)
    10. This Wheel's on Fire (Live)
    11. Jesus Is Just Alright (Live)
    12. Eight Miles High (Live)
    13. Break Song (Live)
    The Byrds
    $32.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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