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  • Head Hunters (45 RPM) Head Hunters (45 RPM) Quick View

    $54.99
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    Head Hunters (45 RPM)

    Herbie Hancock's Masterpiece, Now Cut At 45 RPM!


    The Second Highest-Selling Jazz Album Of All Time!


    Mastered at Sterling Sound by Ryan Smith


    Stoughton Printing Old-Style Deluxe Film-Lamination Tip-On Jacket


    Double LP 200-Gram Discs Plated and Pressed at Quality Record Pressings!


    There are few artists in the music industry who have had more influence on acoustic and electronic jazz and R&B than Herbie Hancock.


    In 1963, Miles Davis invited Hancock to join the Miles Davis Quintet. During his five years with Davis, Herbie recorded many classics with the jazz legend including ESP, Nefertiti, and Sorcerer, and later on, he made appearances on Davis' groundbreaking In a Silent Way and Bitches Brew.


    Hancock's own solo career blossomed on Blue Note, with classic albums including Maiden Voyage, Empyrean Isles and Speak Like a Child. After leaving Davis' fold, Herbie put together a new band called The Headhunters and, in 1973 in San Francisco, recorded Head Hunters.


    Head Hunters became not only Hancock's best-selling album but also the second highest selling jazz album of all time (at last RIAA count). It was in 1973 that he gathered a new band to combine electric music with funk, perhaps best exemplified in the pop music of Sly Stone.


    Hancock took over all synthesizer duties, along with Fender Rhodes and clavinet and was backed by bass and drums. The opening bars of Watermelon Man with Bill Summers blowing into a beer bottle, along with the band's funky grooves and new electric sounds, captured the crossover fans who had otherwise avoided buying jazz records.


    Head Hunters was a pivotal point in Hancock's career, bringing him into the vanguard of jazz fusion. Hancock had pushed avant-garde boundaries on his own albums and with Miles Davis, but he had never devoted himself to the groove as he did on Head Hunters. Drawing heavily from Sly Stone, Curtis Mayfield, and James Brown, Hancock developed deeply funky, even gritty, rhythms over which he soloed on electric synthesizers, bringing the instrument to the forefront of jazz. It had all of the sensibilities of jazz, particularly in the way it wound off into long improvisations, but its rhythms were firmly planted in funk, soul, and R&B, giving it a mass appeal that made it the biggest-selling jazz album of all time (a record which was later broken).


    Jazz purists, of course, decried the experiments at the time, but Head Hunters still sounds fresh and vital four decades after its initial release, and its genre-bending proved vastly influential on not only jazz, but funk, soul, and hip-hop.

    1. Chameleon
    2. Watermelon Man
    3. Sly
    4. Vein Melter
    Herbie Hancock
    $54.99
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP 45 RPM - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Watermelon Slim Direct-To-Disc Watermelon Slim Direct-To-Disc Quick View

    $19.99
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    Watermelon Slim Direct-To-Disc

    Bill Watermelon Slim Homans is nothing if not a renaissance man. He attended Middlebury College in Vermont on a fencing scholarship but dropped out to enlist in the Army for the Vietnam War. While laid up in a Vietnam hospital bed, he taught himself upside-down, left-handed slide guitar. He worked as a truck driver, a forklift operator, a saw mill hand, a funeral officiator and at times as a small-time criminal. Due to the latter vocation, he fled Boston to lay low in Oklahoma where he farmed watermelons, hence his stage name. Hes earned two undergrad degrees along with a master's. He painted art and briefly joined Mensa. Oh, and he likes to read Shakespeare and bowls a steady 240.


    No surprise then that he draws from a plenty diverse range of influences to form his unique brand of raw and honest blues. Its music as interesting as the man.

    1. Angel From Montgomery (John Prime)
    2. I Ain't Whistling Dixie
    3. Smokestack Lightning (Chester Burnett)
    4. Take My Mother Home
    5. Oklahoma Blues
    6. Immortal
    Watermelon Slim
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP D2D - Sealed Direct to Disc (D2D) Buy Now
  • Watermelon, Chicken & Grits Watermelon, Chicken & Grits Quick View

    $29.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Watermelon, Chicken & Grits

    Like their moniker suggests, the six-man hip-hop group known as Nappy Roots are raw and untamed, yet deeply connected to the musical past. The Kentucky-based collective (Big V, Ron Clutch, Fishscales, R. Prophet, B. Stille, and Skinny DeVille) first made a name for themselves with their two independently released collections - 1998's COUNTRY FRIED CESS and and 1999's NO COMB, NO BRUSH, NO FADE, NO PERM - as well as with live shows alongside such hip-hop stars as Digital Underground, Youngbloods, Jim Crowes, 112, Cashmoney Millionaire, 8 Ball, Ruffryders, MJG, Sole, and Twista. In addition, the group scored with their version of Riches To Rags (Mmmkay), which was featured on Atlantic's 1999 release, MUSIC FROM AND INSPIRED BY THE MOTION PICTURE - SOUTH PARK: BIGGER, LONGER & UNCUT.


    Now, with their long-awaited Atlantic Records debut, WATERMELON, CHICKEN, AND GRITZ, Nappy Roots are ready to spread their unique sound and vision from coast to coast. The group's organically funky hip-hop stylings blend serious lyrical science and Dirty South grooves, notably on tracks like the ruminating Life's A Risk and the block-rockin' party anthem, Ballin On A Budget. Produced by such esteemed hip-hop studio whizes as Carlos Broady (The Notorious B.I.G., Lil' Kim, Black Rob, India.Aire), Mike City (Sunshine Anderson, Bilal), the Trackboyz (Abyss), Jazze Pha (Ludacris, Too $hort), and Troy Johnson (Ray-J, Lil' Mo), WATERMELON, CHICKEN, AND GRITZ is likely to propel Nappy Roots to the forefront of modern hip-hop and beyond.


    Certified Gold by the RIAA. (4/02)

    1. Intro
    2. Hustla
    3. Set It Out
    4. Country Boyz
    5. Ballin' on a Budget
    6. Awnaw
    7. Headz Up
    8. Slums
    9. Po' Folks
    10. Start It Over
    11. Blowin' Trees
    12. Sholiz
    13. Life's a Bitch
    14. My Ride
    15. One Forty
    16. Dime, Quarter, Nickel, Penny
    17. Kentucky Mud
    18. The Lounge
    19. Ho Down
    20. Headz Up [Refried]
    Nappy Roots
    $29.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Five Faces Of Manfred Mann The Five Faces Of Manfred Mann Quick View

    $24.99
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    The Five Faces Of Manfred Mann

    Manfred Mann's second American LP The Five Faces of Manfred Mann is a worthy follow-up, boasting a dozen notable tunes including the hits Sha La La and Come Tomorrow, plus some impressive originals and a distinctive version of the Herbie Hancock/Mongo Santamaria standard Watermelon Man that give the musicians a chance to demonstrate their considerable jazz chops.
    1. Sha La La
    2. Come Tomorrow
    3. She
    4. Can't Believe It
    5. John Hardy
    6. Did You Have To Do That
    7. Watermelon Man
    8. I'm Your Kingpin
    9. Hubble Bubble
    10. You've Got To Take It
    11. Groovin'
    12. Dashing Away With The Smoothing Iron
    Manfred Mann's Earth Band
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Flood (Speakers Corner) Flood (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $64.99
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    Flood (Speakers Corner)

    In the summer of 1975, the Herbie Hancock Sextet made a hugely successful tour of Japan, which made people aware of a 'new' Hancock. The last LP that the keyboard virtuoso had recorded, Thrust, was already one year old, and the film music for the Charles Bronson classic Death Wish was received negatively by his fans. At his concerts in Tokyo, Herbie Hancock reached back to his hits: Maiden Voyage, Chameleon, and the famous, soulful Watermelon Man made the fans at his concert hall and open-air appearances go wild with enthusiasm. Forty years later I have the courage to confess that I couldn't have cared less about this music at the time; in Europe there was enough that was new and exciting to see and listen to. However, this re-release in its original format has given me the opportunity to check out whether this music has withstood the test of time. And I must say: it has passed the test! Just listen to Herbie at his best!
    Dr. Michael Frohne



    Musicians:



    • Herbie Hancock (keyboard)

    • Bennie Maupin (saxophone, clarinet, flute, percussion)

    • Blackbird McKnight (guitar)

    • Paul Jackson (bass)

    • Mike Clark (drums)

    • Bill Summers (conga, percussion)




    Recording: June and July 1975 at Shibuja Kohkaido and Nakano Sun Plaza, Tokyo, by Tomoo Suzuki
    Production: David Rubinson




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Herbie Hancock
    $64.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Sin & Soul (Speakers Corner) (On Sale) Sin & Soul (Speakers Corner) (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $34.99 $27.64 Save $7.35 (21%)

    Buy Now
    x

    Sin & Soul (Speakers Corner) (On Sale)

    When Oscar Brown died at the age of 78 in 2005, one journalist at least, from The New York Times, was unsure as to how to describe the artist to whom America had just bid a final farewell. To write in his obituary that he was a jazz singer seemed too platitudinous, because Brown didn't just sing his songs, he performed them. But it would have been just as wrong to honour him as a jazz songwriter, despite his collaborations with Miles Davis and Max Roach, because he was more closely associated with gospel, folk and blues.
    His vocal qualities lie in a recitative-like, dry declamation, sharp as a knife, as is clearly heard in Work Song. The pain brought on by life's adversities can be cried out internally even if you appear to remain unaffected outwardly (But I Was Cool). A portion of sarcasm is necessary when the singsong of a slave trader constantly calls for higher bids (Bid 'Em In), and when a babbling child can pester its daddy with both banal and existential questions (Dat Dere).



    The generously manned band does not often play all together as in the springy Signifyin' Monkey. Here we have just a few chords on the piano (Watermelon Man), there a gently plucked guitar (Brown Baby), or a quiet pulsating rhythm (Afro Blue) - very often not much more was needed for a sin and soul performance by Oscar Brown, who, by the way, and so typically American, regarded himself as an Entertainer.



    Musicians:



    • Oscar Brown Jr. (vocal)

    • Phil Bodner (saxophone)

    • Billy Butterfield (trumpet)

    • Floyd Morris (piano)

    • Don Arnone (guitar)

    • George Duvivier (bass)

    • Osie Johnson (drums)




    Recording: June - October 1960




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Work Song
    2. But I Was Cool
    3. Bid 'em High
    4. Signifyin' Monkey
    5. Watermelon Man
    6. Somebody By Me A Drink
    7. Rags and Old Iron
    8. Dat Dere
    9. Brown Baby
    10. Humdrum Blues
    11. Sleepy
    12. Afro Blue
    Oscar Brown Jr.
    $34.99 $27.64 Save $7.35 (21%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sin & Soul (Speakers Corner) (Bend In Cover) Sin & Soul (Speakers Corner) (Bend In Cover) Quick View

    $27.99
    x

    Sin & Soul (Speakers Corner) (Bend In Cover)

    When Oscar Brown died at the age of 78 in 2005, one journalist at least, from The New York Times, was unsure as to how to describe the artist to whom America had just bid a final farewell. To write in his obituary that he was a jazz singer seemed too platitudinous, because Brown didn't just sing his songs, he performed them. But it would have been just as wrong to honour him as a jazz songwriter, despite his collaborations with Miles Davis and Max Roach, because he was more closely associated with gospel, folk and blues.
    His vocal qualities lie in a recitative-like, dry declamation, sharp as a knife, as is clearly heard in Work Song. The pain brought on by life's adversities can be cried out internally even if you appear to remain unaffected outwardly (But I Was Cool). A portion of sarcasm is necessary when the singsong of a slave trader constantly calls for higher bids (Bid 'Em In), and when a babbling child can pester its daddy with both banal and existential questions (Dat Dere).



    The generously manned band does not often play all together as in the springy Signifyin' Monkey. Here we have just a few chords on the piano (Watermelon Man), there a gently plucked guitar (Brown Baby), or a quiet pulsating rhythm (Afro Blue) - very often not much more was needed for a sin and soul performance by Oscar Brown, who, by the way, and so typically American, regarded himself as an Entertainer.



    Musicians:



    • Oscar Brown Jr. (vocal)

    • Phil Bodner (saxophone)

    • Billy Butterfield (trumpet)

    • Floyd Morris (piano)

    • Don Arnone (guitar)

    • George Duvivier (bass)

    • Osie Johnson (drums)




    Recording: June - October 1960




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Work Song
    2. But I Was Cool
    3. Bid 'em High
    4. Signifyin' Monkey
    5. Watermelon Man
    6. Somebody By Me A Drink
    7. Rags and Old Iron
    8. Dat Dere
    9. Brown Baby
    10. Humdrum Blues
    11. Sleepy
    12. Afro Blue
    Oscar Brown Jr.
    $27.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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