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  • 1 Hopeful Rd 1 Hopeful Rd Quick View

    $21.99
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    1 Hopeful Rd

    Over the past few years, Vintage Trouble have wowed audiences across the globe by opening for The Rolling Stones in London's Hyde Park, touring with legends like The Who and AC/DC, and playing sold-out headline shows worldwide. Now, on their first album for Blue Note Records, the Los Angeles-based foursome - singer Ty Taylor, guitarist Nalle Colt, bassist Rick Barrio Dill, and drummer Richard Danielson channel the vitality and passion of their live show into a fresh and urgent take on guitar-powered rhythm & blues. Produced by Blue Note president and three-time Grammy Award-winner Don Was, 1 Hopeful Rd. finds Vintage Trouble building off the groove-fueled sound that Yahoo! once painted as ''James Brown singing lead for Led Zeppelin'' and blending blues, soul, and riff-heavy rock & roll with joyfully gritty abandon. As heard on lead single ''Run Like the River,'' 1 Hopeful Rd. matches Vintage Trouble's emotional intensity with a raw yet sophisticated musicianship that's prompted the New York Times to name the band modern-day answer to Otis Redding and BBC Radio 6 to anoint them ''the heirs of rhythm and blues.''
    1. Run Like The River
    2. From My Arms
    3. Doin What You Were Doin'
    4. Angel City, California
    5. Shows What You Know
    6. My Heart Won't Fall Again
    7. Another Man's Words
    8. Strike Your Light
    9. Before The Tear Drops
    10. If You Loved Me
    11. Another Baby
    12. Soul Serenity
    Vintage Trouble
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Dark Star Soundtrack Dark Star Soundtrack Quick View

    $26.99
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    Dark Star Soundtrack


    Limited Edition Vinyl + 7 EP Pressed On ALIEN RED Wax


    Limited To 500


    Dark Star (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack - Extended & Remastered). Music composed by John Carpenter


    WRWTFWW Records is ecstatic to bring back the original motion picture soundtrack for John Carpenter's Dark Star (1974) with added bonuses that are sure to satisfy all cult sci-fi soundtrack completists of the galaxy (and further).


    This limited edition double vinyl combo comes with a 12 and a 7. The former is a remastered version of the original motion picture soundtrack consisting of incidental music, sound effects, John Carpenter's synth experimentations, dialogue excerpts, and vintage interferences extracted directly from the film roll.


    The 7 is red with a yellow label circled in black (in pure beachball alien fashion) and contains "Ode to a Bell Jar" remade by loyal Carpenter collaborator Alan Howarth (Escape from New York, Christine, Big Trouble in Little China, They Live ), the fan favorite "Benson Arizona" remade by Dominik Hauser, the very sought-after "When Twilight Falls on NGC 891" by Martin Segundo & the Scintilla Strings (in the real world *James Clarke's Spring Bossa), as well as endless loops of sound effects from the movie to turn your house into your very own scout ship. Oh and there is a very secret hidden bonus track too!


    It all comes in slick thermostellar triggering packaging with a brand new artwork and invisible hyperdrive electronics - the best way to relive the Dark Star adventure and celebrate John Carpenter's first directorial feature film released in 1974 and co-written by (and starring!) all around legend Dan O'Bannon (Alien, Lifeforce, The Return of the Living Dead). Let there be light!


    - The most comprehensive vinyl edition of the original motion picture soundtrack for John Carpenter's first feature film, Dark Star (1974). - For the fans of John Carpenter, sci-fi movie soundtracks, electronic experimentations, and strange vinyl releases. Also, for surfers. - Includes the sought-after "When Twilight Falls on NGC 891" by Martin Segundo & the Scintilla Strings, for the first time ever on a John Carpenter-related release.

    LP:
    1. Music, Sound Effects and Dialogue Excerpts Part 1 (Remastered)
    2. Music, Sound Effects and Dialogue Excerpts Part 2 (Remastered)


    7'':
    1. Martin Segundo and the Scintilla Strings - When Twilight Falls on NGC 891
    2. Alan Howarth - Doolittle's Solo (Remake)
    3. Loop #1
    4. Loop #2
    5. Dominik Hauser - Benson Arizona (Remake)
    6. Very secret hidden bonus track
    7. Loop #3
    8. Loop #4

    John Carpenter
    $26.99
    Vinyl LP + 7 - Sealed Buy Now
  • After The Rain After The Rain Quick View

    $19.99
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    After The Rain

    The second of two electric-blues albums released on Chess Records and Cadet Concept imprint in the late 60s, Muddy Waters' After the Rain has achieved cult-like status amongst blues fans in the years since his death in 1983. After taking a backlash from critics with first attempt at adopting psychedelic influences on Electric Mud, Muddy made adjustments for the follow-up, despite keeping a majority of the same session players. This time, he toned down the psychedelic elements and put them in balance with his classic Chicago blues sound, and the results yield some vintage tracks that glow with fuzzy guitars and bass: I Am the Blues, Ramblin' Mind, Bottom of the Sea, and Blues Trouble. After being out of print for years, Get On Down is proud to present this rare classic from Muddy Waters pulled from the original masters and presented on LP.
    1. I Am The Blues
    2. Ramblin' Mind
    3. Rollin' and Tumblin'
    4. Bottom of the Sea
    5. Honey Bee
    6. Blues and Trouble
    7. Hurtin' Soul
    8. Screamin' and Cryin'
    Muddy Waters
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Walt Wolfman Walt Wolfman Quick View

    $14.99
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    Walt Wolfman

    About a year ago, Richard Swift horrifically fractured his left ring finger. For a moment his nimble guitar and piano work flashed before his eyes. Doctors were saying things like movement and feeling could eventually return, etc, etc. Certainly, not even a little blip on the sadness radar of humanity, but a massive bummer for a fellow who has carved out a niche as one of independent music's sought after session players and producers and especially in relation to the astounding Richard Swift solo output we all know and love.


    So, it's with a great, collective sigh of relief that he's back to churning out new material like Whitman. It's chugging, chiming and triumphant, featuring Swift's always endearing falsetto and casual call-and-response lyricism. I've got my own Whitman...Farewell, farewell/I hope it did you good/To say the things/My father never could, Swift pines. The song is a cryptic salute to Walt Whitman, whose American lineage of primal, urgent art can be traced to include Kerouac and Dylan, Bo Diddley and Beefheart right on through to modern outsider-pop wunderkinds like Swift. And according to Swift, Whitman is a nice taste of what we can expect from his next longform recording.


    The same can be said for the remainder of the Walt Wolfman EP. Conceived in the same spirit that gave us 2008's cult favorite Ground Trouble Jaw EP, these blown-out, basement R&B rippers are not for the faint of heart. They require movement and sweat, dancing with a cocktail glass in your grip until your shoes are soaked in booze. Highlight of the set, MG 333, is a raw and ghostly trance, a blast of kinetic energy and jazz cigarette smoke. Meanwhile, the neu-vintage jive of Drakula (Hey Man) and Zombie Boogie pack a timelessness that transcends their seasonal titles. And yeah, that's Swift himself on rapid-fire drums across the whole damn set. Shit, he might have been fine without that measly finger after all.

    1. Whitman
    2. Mg 333
    3. Laugh It Up
    4. Zombie Boogie
    5. Out & About
    6. Drakula (Hey Man!)
    7. St. Michael
    Richard Swift
    $14.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Loyalty Loyalty Quick View

    $21.99
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    Loyalty

    The record was called Loyalty from the beginning-it was the first decision I made about it. It's a word you
    usually see written in copperplate script, a virtue: LOYALTY. But the songs don't treat it that way, just as a
    thing to unpack. It's a force that you have to reckon with: loyalty to the dream, to the "work," to the mythical idea of "you" that somebody thought they saw. It can be a weakness as much as a strength; it can keep you from the reality of your own life, your own self. - Tamara Lindeman


    In excess virtue lies danger, or at least limits to pragmatic action-it's a lesson hard learned by anyone
    disillusioned by the erosion of youthful mythologies. Strict fealty to a fixed ideal of identity doesn't do us
    any favors as adults. Loyalty, the third and finest album yet by The Weather Station (and the first for
    Paradise of Bachelors) wrestles with these knotty notions of faithfulness/faithlessness-to our idealism,
    our constructs of character, our memories, and to our family, friends, and lovers-representing a bold
    step forward into new sonic and psychological inscapes. It's a natural progression for Toronto artist
    Tamara Lindeman's acclaimed songwriting practice. Recorded at La Frette Studios just outside Paris in
    the winter of 2014, in close collaboration with Afie Jurvanen (Bahamas) and Robbie Lackritz (Feist),
    the record crystallizes her lapidary songcraft into eleven emotionally charged vignettes and intimate
    portraits, redolent of fellow Canadians Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen, and David Wiffen, but utterly her
    own.


    Lindeman describes La Frette, housed in an enormous, crumbling 19th-century mansion, as
    "a secret garden, a place of enchantment and grace": walls mantled in ivy and lions, corridors piled high
    with discarded tape machines, old reels, and priceless guitars. As she puts it, "Recording where we did
    meant we embraced beauty-we weren't afraid of it being beautiful." Like the record itself, it's a quietly
    radical statement, especially since certain passages achieve a diaphanous eeriness and harmonic and
    rhythmic tension new to The Weather Station. The stacked vocal harmonies of "Tapes," the drifting,
    jazz-inflected chording in "Life's Work," and the glacial percussion in "Personal Eclipse" contribute to a
    pervading sense of clock-stopping bloom and smolder, recalling the spooky avant-soul of Terry Callier's
    Occasional Rain.


    Beyond the decaying decadence and vintage gear, the brokedown palace atmosphere of
    La Frette afforded a more significant interior luxury as well, one stated with brutal honesty in the
    stunning "Shy Women": "it seemed to me that luxury would be to be not so ashamed, not to look away."


    Accordingly, Loyalty brings a freshly unflinching self-examining gaze and emotional and musical control
    to The Weather Station's songs. She is an extraordinary singer and instrumentalist-on Loyalty she plays
    guitar, banjo, keys, and vibes-but Lindeman has always been a songwriter's songwriter, recognized for
    her intricate, carefully worded verse, filled with double meanings, ambiguities, and complex metaphors.
    Though more moving than ever, her writing here is almost clinical in its discipline, its deliberate wording
    and exacting delivery, evoking similarly idiosyncratic songsters from Linda Perhacs to Bill Callahan.


    Outside her musical practice, Lindeman also happens to be an accomplished film and
    television actor, and it's her directorial eye for quietly compelling characters and the rich details of the
    everyday, Bressonian in its specificity and scope, that drives the limpid singularity of The Weather
    Station's songs. As in Bresson's films, there is no trace of theater here, no brittle singer-songwriter
    histrionics, but rather a powerful performative focus and narrative restraint, a commitment to what the
    auteur called the "simultaneous precision and imprecision of music." Despite the descriptive delicacy, the
    album never lapses into preciousness or sentimentality, instead retaining its barbs and bristles and
    remaining resolutely clear-eyed and thick-skinned. Lyrically, Loyalty inverts and involutes the language
    of confession, of regret, of our most private and muddled mental feelings, by externalizing those
    anxieties through exquisite observation of the things and people we accumulate, the modest meanings
    accreted during even our most ostensibly mundane domestic moments. ("Your trouble is like a lens," she
    discerns in "I Mined," "through which the whole world bends.")


    "Tapes" and "I Could Only Stand By" expose and exalt the quotidian-"the little tapes"
    hidden beneath a lover's bed, "the sunken old moorings" at the "bruise-colored lake"-without romanticizing
    these scenes of, respectively, grief and guilt. "Like Sisters" analyzes the darker contours of a
    friendship with devastating scrutiny. The breathless momentum of "Way It Is, Way It Could Be"-"both
    are," she sings of the way we sometimes live, for better or for worse, amid multiple truths-hinges on a
    mysterious moment when two brown dogs die underwheel, then don't, and that gut-sickness is
    overturned, a sin redeemed with a second glance. "Floodplain" and "Personal Eclipse" are also road songs
    about traveling through, and owning, the empty places in-between, literally and figuratively-what
    Lindeman deems "the various ways people try to disappear from themselves, in physical distance, in
    politeness."


    To invoke Melville (author of PoB's namesake story), "extreme loyalty to the piety of love"
    can be a destabilizing force, a kind of bondage from which we must emancipate ourselves. The line is
    from his strange masterpiece Pierre, or the Ambiguities; The Weather Station's Loyalty could quite easily
    support the same subtitle for the fascinating ways it navigates the deep canyons between certainty and
    uncertainty, faith and doubt.

    1. Way It Is, Way It Could Be
    2. Loyalty
    3. Floodplain
    4. Shy Women
    5. Personal Eclipse
    6. Life's Work
    7. Like Sisters
    8. I Mined
    9. Tapes
    10. I Could Only Stand By
    11. At Full Height
    The Weather Station
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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