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The Harder They Come

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  • Funky Kingston Funky Kingston Quick View

    $19.99
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    Funky Kingston


    Reissued In A Lovingly Re-printed Version Of The Original LP Sleeve


    Ranked 378/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.


    Toots & The Maytals' long and storied musical career spans all the way back to the dawn of ska. The
    group are not only key figures in the development reggae, they were among the first to utilize the word
    in a song title which lead to the popularization of the very term reggae. Among the numerous musical
    accomplishments of Frederick Toots Hibbert and his group was the song Pressure Drop, which was
    released initially in 1970, but received widespread acclaim for its appearance in the soundtrack to the film
    Harder They Come. It's since been covered by The Clash, The Specials, The Selecter, Robert Palmer, and
    numerous others, has been rated by Rolling Stone as one of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, and is
    credited with helping introduce reggae music to the world.


    Though originally released in 1970, the US wouldn't get to experience Pressure Drop until 1975, when
    it was released on the US version of their album Funky Kingston, easily considered one of the strongest
    albums in Toots & The Maytals' catalog, not to mention one of the greatest in reggae history. Upon its
    release in the States it received massive critical applause (Even warming the cold, icy heart of Robert
    Christgau) for its infectious melodies and rhythms on tracks like Sailing On, Time Tough, and the
    eponymous title track, quirky Jamaica-infused covers of tracks by John Denver and Ike Turner, and of
    course the influential Pressure Drop.


    Reissued in a lovingly re-printed version of the original LP sleeve, Get On Down now presents a superb
    reissue of a legendary piece of music history.

    1. Time Tough
    2. In The Dark
    3. Funky Kingston
    4. Love Is Gonna Let Me Down
    5. Louie Louie
    6. Pomp And Price
    7. Got To Be There
    8. Country Road
    9. Pressure Drop
    10. Sailing On
    Toots And The Maytals
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Chicago 17 Chicago 17 Quick View

    $31.99
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    Chicago 17


    Mastered From Original Chicago Records Master Tapes


    Mastered by Friday Music's Joe Reagoso With Chicago's Lee Loughnane


    Ballads were a big part of 17 -- in fact, these hits and album cuts like Remember the Feeling are among the first power ballads, ballads that were given arena rock flourishes and dramatic arrangements but never took the focus off the melody, so housewives and preteens alike could sing along with them. Power ballads later became the province of hair metal bands like Bon Jovi and Poison, but Foster's work with Chicago on 17 really helped set the stage for them, since he not only gave the ballads sweeping rock arrangements, but the harder, punchier tunes here play like ballads.


    Even when the band turns up the intensity here -- Stay the Night has a spare, rather ominous beat that suggests they were trying for album-oriented rock; Along Comes a Woman has a stiff drum loop and a hiccupping synth bass that suggests dance-pop -- the music is still slick, shiny, and soft, music that can appeal to the widest possible audience. 17 did indeed find the widest possible audience, as it ruled radio into late 1985, by which time there were plenty of imitators of Foster's style. There may have been plenty of imitators -- soon, solo Cetera was one of them, making music that was indistinguishable from this -- but nobody bettered Foster, and Chicago 17 is his pièce de rÉsistance, a record that sounded so good it didn't quite matter that some of the material didn't stick as songs; as a production, it was the pinnacle of his craft and one of the best adult contemporary records of the '80s, perhaps the best of them all.


    Certainly, it's hard to think of another adult contemporary album quite as influential within its style as this -- not only did it color the records that followed, but it's hard not to think of Chicago 17 as the place where soft rock moved away from the warm, lush sounds that defined the style in the late '70s and early '80s and moved toward the crisp, meticulous, synthesized sound of adult contemporary pop.

    1. Stay the Night
    2. We Can Stop the Hurtin'
    3. Hard Habit to Break
    4. Only You
    5. Remember the Feeling
    6. Along Comes A Woman
    7. You're the Inspiration
    8. Please Hold On
    9. Prima Donna
    10. Once In A Lifetime
    Chicago
    $31.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Buy Now
  • IV IV Quick View

    $16.99
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    IV

    Dub Trio is back with their fourth and most powerful album to date, IV, an overwhelming blend of sounds, styles and ideas that come out swinging, and hit harder than ever. Can metal coexist with dubs bass heavy rhythms? Dub Trios newest album proves that not only can such incongruities coexist, but that in the right hands they flourish!


    With IV the band succeeds dramatically at emphasizing the theories, emotions, sounds and concepts of their current musical exploration. IV finds the members playing multiple instruments, tweaking, turning and torturing knobs, cutting and chopping the audio itself, and shaping the compositions to create their own unique interpretation of dub as an art form.


    As go-to live musicians for both Mike Patton and Matisyahu, Dub Trio has also worked closely with Lady Gaga as her original showcasing band, 50 Cent and G-Unit, Mary J. Blige, Tupac, Yoko Ono, The Fugees, Lauryn Hill, Mos Def, Mobb Deep, and many more.

    1. En Passant
    2. Noise
    3. Swarm
    4. Control Issue Controlling Your Mind
    5. Ends Justify the Means
    6. Words
    7. Patient Zero
    8. 1:1.618
    9. Thousand Mile Stare
    Dub Trio
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • You Can Get It If You Really Want (Pre-Order) You Can Get It If You Really Want (Pre-Order) Quick View

    $23.99
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    You Can Get It If You Really Want (Pre-Order)

    Pressed On Black & Blue Marble Colored Vinyl


    Limited To 1000 Copies


    It took the 1972 release of the soundtrack to The Harder They Come to break Desmond Dekker internationally, but the King of Ska already was a legend in his own land of Jamaica, where songs like "007 (Shanty Town)" and "Rudie Got Soul" made him the face of the rude boy culture (and influenced several generations of British mods and rockers). This 1970 record, his first for the Trojan label, features Dekker's irresistible version of the Jimmy Cliff tune "You Can Get It If You Really Want," which went to #2 on the UK charts, as well as another hit, "Pickney Gal." We're reissuing this cornerstone ska/rocksteady classic on black & blue marble vinyl limited to 1000 copies first-ever reissue on wax!

    1. You Can Get It If You Really Want
    2. I Believe
    3. Perseverance
    4. Get Up Little Suzie
    5. Peace on the Land
    6. Cindy
    7. Pickney Gal
    8. You Got Soul
    9. Coomyah
    10. That's the Way Life Goes
    11. Peace of Mind
    12. Polka Dot
    Desmond Dekker
    $23.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed PRE-ORDER Buy Now
  • Blood // Sugar // Secs // Traffic Blood // Sugar // Secs // Traffic Quick View

    $17.99
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    Blood // Sugar // Secs // Traffic

    Hey, what's this? Well that, my friend, is the newest album from The
    Gotobeds, entitled Blood // Sugar // Secs // Traffic. It's their second
    full-length LP and their first for Sub Pop. Whoa, whoa, please slow down.
    I'm already completely lost. What you just said sounded like a stream of
    complete gibberish. Okay, I'll lay it out for you and if you have any
    questions could you yell them at me? SOUNDS GOOD. The Gotobeds
    formed vaguely around 2009 in Pittsburgh and play a mutant strain of rock
    music that is often filed under punk, indie rock, or 99-cent discount bin.
    WAIT, THE GOTOBEDS? I HEARD THEY WERE KNUCKLEHEADS! Only if
    the knuckle is the part of the human body that contains the brains. Much
    like their previous releases on underground stalwart labels like Mind Cure
    and 12XU, this new album artfully slips intelligence and experimentation
    into a dying art form. It's a harder feat than you'd think.


    And sure, their live shows have often been compared to an all night party
    where I feared for my life and the lives of everybody in the five block
    radius, and their recorded output is akin to the sonic manifestos of four
    men deprived of human love and raised on beer and Swell Maps, Mission
    of Burma, and old Fall records. But what you get with The Gotobeds,
    delivered in spades on this album, is smart, noisy rock with just the right
    amount of stupid.


    FAIR ENOUGH. SO HOW'D THIS GET MADE? It was recorded in bursts
    over several months of 2015 in their friend My War Matt's basement in
    Pittsburgh. Unlike previously, the songs were conceived and recorded in
    blocks, which resulted in a more experimental feel. But this is no chin
    stroking curate's egg. You like loud, double guitar leads? OF COURSE I DO.
    WHO DOESN'T? You're in luck, because this album is carpeted with em,
    thanks to Eli Kasan and TFP. On a song like 'Bodies,' it sounds as if
    you've walked into the biggest Guitar Center, but, you know, not terrible.
    Keeping it all locked down is the rhythm section of drummer, Cary Belback
    and bassist, Gavin Jensen. They allow the downright prettiness of a song
    like Red Alphabet to shine, and the lyrics on the anti-sexism thrash of
    Crisis Time to punch through.


    THIS ALL SOUNDS WONDERFUL, IS THERE ANYTHING ELSE I NEED
    TO CARE ABOUT? Eh, probably not. Except that Tim Midyett (Silkworm,
    Bottomless Pit, Mint Mile) and some bum (Protomartyr) are featured as
    guest vocalists on Rope and Why'd You, respectively. Also, I'd be remiss
    to not mention the fact that the band's live show is a testament to the
    cathartic nature of speed, skill, repetition, noise, and red stage lights. If
    you don't believe me, ask the bands they have played with, like Total
    Control, Tyvek, or The Replacements. Also, they rep Pittsburgh harder than
    anyone possibly could and come off better for it...which is saying
    something.


    I THINK I UNDERSTAND. BLOOD // SUGAR // SECS // TRAFFIC IS THE
    GREATEST ALBUM SINCE THE LAST GOTOBEDS RECORD? Yes. Now
    please stop yelling. -Joe Casey, Protomartyr

    1. Real Maths/Too Much
    2. "Bodies"
    3. Brass Not Rash
    4. Rope
    5. Why'd You
    6. Red Alphabet
    7. Cold Gold (LA's Alright)
    8. Crises Time
    9. Manifest
    10. Glass House
    11. Amazing Supermarkets
    The Gotobeds
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • 100 Demons 100 Demons Quick View

    $15.99
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    100 Demons

    100 Demons Self Titled album was produced and recorded by Zeuss at Planet Z Studios (Hatebreed).


    Connecticut has always been a breeding ground for heavy and menacing music. After five years of progression, 100 Demons rose to the forefront of that influential Connecticut hardcore community. The 100 Demons approach is monstrous, rich with hardcore intensity and gut wrenching metallic precision. Encapsulating a pure viciousness and ravenous intensity that few ever could achieve. Sicker, meaner, and outright harder than any of their contemporaries. 100 Demons truly are as heavy as they come.

    1. Time Bomb
    2. Destiny Never Came
    3. Dying In My Own Arms
    4. Repeat Process
    5. Something Terrible
    6. Lord Have Mercy
    7. Non Believer
    8. His Father's Son
    9. Never Surrender Virtue (No Desit Virtus)
    100 Demons
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Acrobatic Tenement (Awaiting Repress) Acrobatic Tenement (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $19.99
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    Acrobatic Tenement (Awaiting Repress)

    Though Acrobatic Tenement may only be a blueprint for the band's later albums, it comes fully formed -- and as forceful as a bullet to the head. Cedric Dixler's barked emotional ferocity is perfectly complemented by nimble dual guitars, while Pall's bass snakes in and out of the heady mix. The result is a lurching masterpiece of an album that threatens to explode -- or implode -- at any moment. Unlike most hardcore bands, At the Drive-In know the value of subtlety, a trick they use to create an elaborate punk/metal soundscape of rhythms and tempo shifts. Not that these guys don't rock; in fact, slowing down once in a while gives the harder sections even more intensity. This is great music in the tradition of the Stooges and Fugazi, and is reminiscent of both those bands at their best. Not just a great album of the post-everything '90s, but a true timeless masterpiece of oblique lyrical insights and furiously rocking good tunes.

    -All Music Guide
    1. Star Slight
    2. Schaffino
    3. Ebroglio
    4. Initiation
    5. Communication Drive-In
    6. Skips on the Record
    7. Paid Vacation Time
    8. Ticklish
    9. Blue Tag
    10. Coating of Arms
    11. Porfirio Diaz
    At The Drive-In
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Never Twice Never Twice Quick View

    $19.99
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    Never Twice

    Brisk, self-contained, a little mysterious, and catchy enough to revisit again and again

    -Paste Magazine


    His style is all his own

    -NPR


    The second coming of soul, infusing a distinctly California surf-rock spin to the genre

    -Vogue


    Many moons ago Primo Pitino, the DJ of San Francisco's legendary Oldies Night, passed me a copy of his friend Nick Waterhouse's "Some Place." Nick was a local vinyl DJ and the kid working at our Shangri-la, Rooky Ricardo's Records. Though he didn't have a band at the time, Waterhouse assembled some local musicians to cut a one-off 45 in the vein of the electrifying mid-century modern rhythm and blues he loved. I threw "Some Place" on the Technics during sound check a few cities down the line and was blown away from the howling falsetto all the way to the end! I gave it a whirl every night from Texas to Tennessee and all the way back home to New York. Not only were the dancers' feet responding, but they were also asking about the track on a nightly basis. The Nashville Scene was so blown away that they printed a piece on Nick after a single listen. DJs and collectors everywhere wanted it so bad that the little record with the big sound started fetching upwards of $300 on Ebay.


    The immediate and unprecedented underground dance party success of Nick's DIY record resulted in a full band, gigs, and, after a number of obstacles, the widely acclaimed 2012 LP Time's All Gone. Nick's music, vision, and fully formed aesthetic caught on globally and he was instantly a fixture at nearly every major nightclub and festival on both sides of the Atlantic, Australia, Japan, and Russia - hitting stages everywhere from Primavera to Montreux Jazz Festival and charting on college, public, and commercial radio.


    Only a year after self-releasing his first single, Nick Waterhouse was thrust into the chaos of leading a band, touring, and recording in the big leagues! Pummeling high speed down a bumpy hill of lineup changes, economic problems, and general chaos without any breaks, Nick made it through and the challenges made him more focused. 2014's Holly captured a more experienced artist upping the ante in writing, performance, recording, and production, inspiring a new level of critical and commercial success.


    In addition to a jam-packed five years on the road, in the studio, and in the practice space, Waterhouse also produced septuagenarian soul legend Ural Thomas, Los Angeles Latin stars the Boogaloo Assassins, and garage rockers the Allah-las. He's currently collaborating with the likes of young Grammy-nominee Leon Bridges and Steven Colbert bandleader Jon Batiste. The Rolling Stones blast Nick's version of "I Can Only Give You Everything" at stadiums before they go onstage. Vogue hired him to pose with Kendall Jenner. He hipped her to Little Willie John while Anna Wintour complimented his shoes. While a lesser artist would get lost in these distractions, Nick Waterhouse's acclaim only seems to energize him and make him work harder and push his music to the next level.


    Nick's latest Never Twice is a culmination, intensification, and realization of everything he's been developing throughout this prolific frenzy. Catchier and loaded with more hits than its predecessors, Nick's new LP is at the same time harder hitting, more rhythmic, more harmonic, more diverse, and more adventurous than any of the excellent work that already separated him from the pack. A cool and elegant post-post-modern cocktail of 1950s r&b and club jazz, mixed with 1960s soul and boogaloo, and shaken with a minimal contemporary sensibility, Never Twice finds the artist taking his time, refining his vision, and speaking with new authority. In five short years Nick Waterhouse has come a long way and it looks like he may have just painted his masterpiece.


    - Jonathan Toubin

    1. It's Time
    2. I Had Some Money (But I Spent It)
    3. Straight Love Affair
    4. Stanyan Street
    5. The Old Place
    6. Katchi (feat. Leon Bridges)
    7. Baby, I'm In The Mood For You
    8. Tracy
    9. Lucky Once
    10. LA Turnaround
    Nick Waterhouse
    $19.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Wayne Interest Wayne Interest Quick View

    $17.99
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    Wayne Interest


    Cribbing as much from Brian Wilson's lyrical topics as they take
    from Dick Dale's reverb-soaked guitar tone"
    - Noisey / Vic


    [The music of the Tijuana Panthers] sounds something like they had
    spent an afternoon with Jan and Dean sharing fish tacos with Quentin Tarantino, before laying down some 4-track recordings with The
    Cramps in a sunlit garage."
    - LA Weekly


    the polished punx in vintage pop-snarlers like the Only Ones, the
    Real Kids, or Generation X."
    -Spin


    Live and on record, the Tijuana Panthers are a great band. You
    could say garage, punk or surf while describing their sound, but
    they're harder to pin than that. The truth is that they write classic
    songs that don't depend on tropes from any genre. They craft perfect
    pop and deliver it with energy and immediacy. However, the real
    magic of this band is in their weirdness.


    Behind their picturesque portraits of daily life is an aching despair.
    This subtle contrast creates an eerie tension between the ideal, the
    real and the surreal. You suddenly realize they're not the happy-golucky beach boys you tried to pin them as, but more akin to sexually
    frustrated soda jerks in a David Lynch film. And this all makes sense
    with the fact that they come from Southern California's shadier city
    of Long Beach, not exactly the fun in the sun that California dreamers might expect.


    For Wayne Interest, the Panthers team up with producer Richard
    Swift. The recordings took place at Swift's studio in Oregon where
    the band decidedly took risks in performance and production. The
    risks paid off. With Swift's direction and upgrade in fidelity, Wayne
    Interest sounds just as compelling in headphones as it would at a
    house party in East LA. It also gives the listener a closer look at the
    idiosyncrasies of the Tijuana Panthers, only making it clearer that
    there's something off about these creeps. Their weirdness, or boldness to be whoever they may be, is what makes this band great. It's
    a rare quality. The more you listen to the Tijuana Panthers the more
    you wonder about them.

    1. Four Horsemen
    2. Torpedo
    3. Cherry Street
    4. Dark Matter
    5. Sooner Or Later
    6. Fired
    7. NOBO
    8. Time
    9. 7th Seal
    10. Everybody's Happy Nowdays
    11. Reaction
    12. Wayne Interest
    13. Money Jar
    14. Car Crash
    Tijuana Panthers
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Time To Die Time To Die Quick View

    $25.99
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    Time To Die

    A cultural as well as a musical force, ELECTRIC WIZARD has left an indelible mark on a host of different genres, the likes of doom, stoner and sludge; at heart, however, they stand as an iconic British metal band, cast in the great tradition, with lyrics and artwork reflecting the hypnotic weight of the music, and subject to the same intelligence and detail.


    Wreathed in occult ritual and drug-culture references, with classic '70s horror an inspirational seam, ELECTRIC WIZARD is poised to turn a page; there's the new deal with Spinefarm Records, plus - after a nine-year hiatus - the return of Mark Greening (the drummer on Dopethrone), who completes the lineup of Oborn, American guitarist Liz Buckingham, a key member since 2003, and new bassist Clayton Burgess (SATAN'S SATYRS).


    Fueled by strong emotion and the harder sounds of late-'60s Detroit, the remodeled lineup - isolated by choice, giant stacks glowing red - set about crafting an eighth studio album to both rival and exceed the milestone recordings of the past, with Buckingham keeping things suitably monolithic and the band generally looking back to some of their earliest influences. Toerag Studios in London was once again charged with capturing The Sound, and (encouragingly) words like raw, hateful and sickeningly heavy are being traded.


    Founding member Jus Oborn said the following: All of our albums in the past have had a theme - revenge, drugs, black magick - and the theme of this one is death. Of course, death to us really means rebirth, so this album is a manifestation of a very primal occult belief in the final sacrifice. We have gone full circle - it was inevitable, but we had to do it. We had to kill the band so we could be reborn. It was the only way to ensure we could come back even stronger.

    LP1
    1. Incense For The Damned
    2. Time To Die
    3. I Am Nothing
    4. Destroy Those Who Love God
    5. Funeral Of Your Mind


    LP2
    1. We Love The Dead
    2. Sadiowitch
    3. Lucifer's Slave
    4. Saturn Dethroned

    Electric Wizard
    $25.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Fortune Fortune Quick View

    $21.99
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    Fortune

    By now, Black Prairie has clearly outgrown its roots as a casual side project, solidifying into a primary, creative focus for its members-a band with its own internal momentum, genuine character and style. Still, it's only become harder to describe what that style is. "I gave up a long time ago," guitarist Jon
    Neufeld says. When asked what kind of music Black Prairie plays, Neufeld usually just says "soft rock," and walks away.


    Black Prairie's fourth full-length record Fortune is an unexpected departure-which is, strangely, exactly what everyone's come to expect from the band. This group of seasoned musicians from Portland, Oregon-each steeped in traditional American acoustic music-has become hellbent on taking one
    imaginative leap after another. "We're a much more fearless writing team now," says bassist Nate Query. The band that started as an informal collective has now materialized into its
    own, fully living thing. Getting together to write Fortune last fall after a busy year of touring and tackling smaller, unconventional songwriting projects, the band felt like they had a well-bred, spirited animal hitched up and waiting for them-a horse flaring its nostrils, ready to run-and they wanted to keep
    driving it through as many different landscapes as they could.


    "It was the most collaborative and magical thing," Chris Funk says. Individual members brought in little strands of ideas, and the band collectively spooled them in like a loom and spun them into songs. Again and again, they found one person's chorus and someone else's verse slapping together like
    attractive magnets, or lines for a lyric flying out of all six mouths. In a way, Fortune is also Black Prairie's most conventional record-thirteen, polished vocal tunes with (mostly) conventional pop song structures. On the other hand, there's a glaring eccentricity to Fortune that hits you right away: here is a band of accomplished acoustic musicians playing what are essentially rock songs, and sometimes with a pretty hard edge-it's a record, band members say, that's trying to channel not the spirit of Earl Scruggs or Jerry Douglas, but Led Zeppelin.

    1. The 84
    2. Kiss Of Fate
    3. Let It Out
    4. Let Me Know Your Heart
    5. Fortune
    6. Trask
    7. If I Knew You Then
    8. Songs To Be Sung
    9. Cold Day
    10. Animal Inside
    11. The White Tundra
    12. Be Good
    13. Count To Ten
    Black Prairie
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Volcano Volcano Quick View

    $20.99
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    Volcano

    James Bagshaw (vocals, guitar), Tom Warmsley (bass, backing vocals), Sam Toms (drums) and Adam Smith (keys) - are set to release their new album, Volcano, via Fat Possum.


    All the elements people loved with Temples' debut, Sun Structures, remain intact, but this time, there is a noticeable evolution presented from the outset. It's clear Volcano is the sound of Temples squaring up to their potential, immediately evident with "Certainty." Its beefed-up beats reveal an expanded sonic firmament, one in which bright synth hooks and insistent choruses circle around each other over chord sequences that strike just the right balance between nice and queasy. "If there's a sense of scale," says frontman James Bagshaw, "It was really just a result of implementing a load of things that we didn't know about the first time around. We didn't even have a subwoofer to listen back to things that we did on Sun Structures, so there was nothing below 50Hz on that record. We didn't even know those frequencies were there!"


    Entirely self-produced and written by all four members of the band, Temples' melodies seem to come effortlessly. There are sun-dazed numbers and lysergic dream-pop songs and those where synth and mellotron interweave to beguiling effect. One thing is certain; it's harder to spot the influences this time around. Mystical language has been supplanted by something more direct. They've been broken down and blended together - fossilized into a single source of creative fuel, resulting in a sound that is undoubtedly Temples. As described by co-founding member Warmsley, "we discovered a lot as we went along, and the excitement at having done so radiates outwards."

    1. Certainty
    2. All Join In
    3. I Wanna Be Your Mirror
    4. Oh The Saviour
    5. Born Into The Sunset
    6. How Would You Like To Go?
    7. Open Air
    8. In My Pocket
    9. Celebration
    10. Mystery Of Pop
    11. Roman Godlike Man
    12. Strange Or Be Forgotten
    Temples
    $20.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • In Between (Discontinued) (On Sale) In Between (Discontinued) (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $14.99 $11.84 Save $3.15 (21%)

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    In Between (Discontinued) (On Sale)

    Kanine Records presents, In Between, the sophomore release from San Francisco's Young Prisms and follow-up to their acclaimed 2011 debut Friends For Now. Still a five piece, (albeit a different five) the album captures the highs and the lows of the last year. Born out of a traumatizing Heathrow Airport crisis and the death of a loved one, a strong sense of rejection, loneliness, and despair all play a huge role in the creation of In Between.


    However, Its not all doom and gloom and its not like childhood friends Gio Betteo and Matthew Allen didnt see the changes coming (they named their first album Friends For Now). They just didnt expect it all to happen in such a dramatic fashion. Still united with singer Stefanie Hodapp and drummer Jordan Silbert, the Young Prisms welcome a second female vocalist/guitarist in Ashley Thomas.


    Its this addition that brings a softer, more melodic touch to their fuzzed out sound. If Friends For Now yields comparisons to My Bloody Valentine and the Jesus and Mary Chain, In Between lends itself more to the Mazzy Star and Slowdive end of the spectrum, and one need not look any further than lead single Four Hours (Away). Its gentle swing and sullen vocal sweep will melt hearts and help pass those cold and dark hours.


    To spotlight how the band has made peace with the past year, check out Runner, which will put a bounce in your step, while Dead Flowers has the Young Prisms stepping on their pedals harder than ever. Album opener Floating in Blue will fill your head with swirly dream pop and the guitar-drenched Midnights When pays homage to the innocent 50s inspired lullaby that Mary Chain fans will swoon to both awake and asleep.


    Enlisting the production of Monte Vallier (Weekend, Mark Eitzel) and once again as a full five piece, the Prisms sound refreshed and indeed Young again. With Allen having moved outside the city, Betteo and Allen began traveling back and forth in between homes to write this record. The result is a perfect soundtrack to the loneliest road trip down California Highway 1 where the lights dim and flicker as the sun sets on the Pacific while the fog and haze return to the redwood forests and coastal cliffs.

    1. Floating in Blue
    2. Dead Flowers
    3. Gone
    4. Four Hours (Away)
    5. Runner
    6. Midnights When
    7. Outside
    8. Better Days
    9. To Touch You
    10. Sunshine
    11. Wedding Bells
    Young Prisms
    $14.99 $11.84 Save $3.15 (21%)
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Grand Master Of The Soprano Saxophone (Pure Pleasure) The Grand Master Of The Soprano Saxophone (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    The Grand Master Of The Soprano Saxophone (Pure Pleasure)

    Sidney Bechet's historic recordings for Blue Note and RCA Victor tend to overshadow some of his other work because they have been reissued more frequently, though there are lesser-known dates worth acquiring as well. This Columbia LP compiles three separate recording sessions made between 1938 and 1947. Bechet sticks almost exclusively to soprano sax throughout each of them and has ample space for his solos, full of his trademark heavy vibrato.


    The earliest set matches him with drummer Zutty Singleton, bassist Henry Turner, and guitarist Leonard Ware (all members of his working band at the time), along with pianist Dave Bowman and baritone saxophonist Ernie Caceres. The Bechet-Singleton collaboration Jungle Drums has delightful solos by the two reeds, along with Singleton's exotic tom-toms.


    Six tracks come from a 1947 quartet with pianist Lloyd Phillips, bassist Pops Foster, and either Freddie Moore or Arthur Herbert on drums. Bechet's swinging tribute to a legendary jazzman, Buddy Bolden Stomp, a romp through Just One Of Those Things, and a heartfelt arrangement of Laura are the highlights of this session.


    Another 1947 session gives a preview of the future of classic jazz, featuring a sextet led by Bechet's star pupil, a young Bob Wilber, along with Dick Wellstood, who would rise to fame as a master stride interpreter. Bechet plays soprano sax and Wilber sticks to clarinet on two numbers, though they switch roles on Kansas City Man Blues. While Wilber doesn't have Bechet's strong vibrato on soprano sax, they are harder to tell apart on clarinet.


    -Ken Dryden/AMG


    Musicians:



    • Sydney Bechet (soprano saxophone)

    • Ernie Caceras (bassoon)

    • Bob Mielke (trombone)

    • Bob Wilber (clarient)

    • Lloyd Phillips (piano)

    • Dave Bowman (piano)

    • Leonard Ware (electric guitar)

    • Henry Turner (bass)

    • George Pops" Foster (bass)

    • Zutty Singleton (drums)

    • Arthur Herbert (drums)




    Recording: November 1938 and July 1947




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Love For Sale
    2. I Had It, But It's All Gone Now
    3. Jungle Drums
    4. Buddy Bolden Stomp
    5. My Woman's Blues
    6. Polka Dot Stomp
    7. Laura
    8. Just One Of Those Things
    9. Kansas City Man Blues
    10. Shake 'em Up
    11. Chant In The Night
    12. The Song Of Songs
    13. What A Dream
    Sydney Bechet
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Mono - Sealed Buy Now
  • Run-DMC Run-DMC Quick View

    $22.99
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    Run-DMC

    Future archaeologists will discuss two periods in 1980s: before Run-DMC and after Run-DMC. It's no exaggeration to say that the group
    changed the course of music in the '80s, bringing the old-school of rap into the new with one simple piece of flat, black plastic.


    Coming up in the rap world of the early 1980s under the wing of Kurtis Blow (group manager Russell Simmons managed Blow, and Run
    was, at one time, a DJ known as "Son of Kurtis Blow") and Blow's bassist and burgeoning super-producer Larry Smith, the trio - Joseph
    "Run" Simmons, Darryl "DMC" McDaniels and Jason "Jam Master Jay" Mizell - learned from the best, but created their own path.


    1983 was the year that they first broke out. With only an Oberheim DMX drum program and some cuts by Jay, "Sucker M.C.s (Krush-Groove
    1)" was a shot across the bow to the slick, post-disco pocket rap had settled into. It was raw, pure swagger and it took both New Yorkers
    and music aficionados around the world by storm. The song's lyrics are a mandatory memorization assignment to this day by MCs learning
    their craft. "Two years ago, a friend of mine "


    The group's sound, which was laid out muscularly on Run-DMC, had a harder approach than their peers, thanks to producer Larry Smith's
    use of live musicians who laid down grooves but didn't soften the edges. Lyrically the group wasn't just about brags either, with songs like
    "Hard Times," "It's Like That" and "Wake Up" (the first two were singles). Run's and DMC's overlapping tag-team approach to lyricism was
    powerful and immensely influential.


    "Rock Box," another single and arguably the centerpiece of the album, was a nod to their hard edge, and a foreshadowing of their first
    worldwide smash, 1985's "King Of Rock." Jam Master Jay's DJ work was stellar, knowing exactly when to jump in and put listeners' ears in
    a headlock.


    The album was the first rap full-length to achieve Gold status, and as fans know, the group was just getting started - their next two LPs would
    take them to even higher status in the music world, critically and sales-wise. But this is where it all started, and it's a classic that still sounds
    fresh today as it did more than 30 years ago.

    1. Hard Times
    2. Rock Box
    3. Jam-Master Jay
    4. Hollis Crew (Krush-Groove 2)
    5. Sucker M.C.'s (Krush-Groove 1)
    6. It's Like That
    7. Wake Up
    8. 30 Days
    9. Jay's Game
    RUN DMC
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Circle The Circle Quick View

    $34.99
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    The Circle

    It's an interesting question to ask: Is that a fair dose of motivation or is that a chip on your shoulder? Jon Bon Jovi posed that question to himself, and it's worth pondering. You might think that a man whose band has sold more than 120 million records and played before tens of millions of fans in the course of an illustrious 26-year career would be content to rest on his considerable laurels, at least for a while.


    You might think that, but you'd be wrong, and the new Bon Jovi album, The Circle, provides irrefutable proof. As its title suggests, The Circle marks a powerful reassertion of Bon Jovi's commitment to the hard-hitting, uplifting rock & roll that has been the band's indelible signature since it began. The band share an abiding bond that informs and defines their music. It is a circle that remains unbroken.


    The album title, Bon Jovi explains, has several meanings. Some may say that with this album we have come full circle. Others may see The Circle as never ending. I see it as very hard to get in to and even harder to get out of, the singer says with a laugh. Having had 5 studio records in this decade, there are songs on each record that represent the world around us. And while they don't always like what they see, they try hard not to see the cup as half empty. From the new single We Weren't Born To Follow to the powerful When We Were Beautiful, the songs are as uplifting and anthemic as anything Bon Jovi and Sambora have ever written.


    Another reason for the anthemic sound of THE CIRCLE is the re-emergence of Richie Sambora. This is meant to be a stadium, turn-the-guitars-back-up record, and that's a testament to having Richie at my side, Jon says. I can't tell you how much that's meant. With me and Richie, one and one makes three.


    That flame burns at the heart of The Circle. When We Were Beautiful shares its title with the superb Bon Jovi documentary by filmmaker Phil Griffin. Like the film, the song is atmospheric and haunting. It opens with a sense of crisis: The world is cracked/The sky is torn. Jon Bon Jovi hears the song as a true departure for the band. That's a unique song, he says, We've written hits, but this is something more, this is something different. I didn't want to sugarcoat things. Those lyrics are factual. As a country and as people, we hit a wall. But the idea is to try to get back to `when we were beautiful.'


    The new studio album, The Circle, was produced by John Shanks, who also worked with the band on the two preceding Bon Jovi albums, Lost Highway (2007) and Have a Nice Day (2005). The album has an underlying positive theme that is apparent throughout the songs. Whether it's questioning your vitality in Fast Cars, or asking what the future holds in Work for the Working Man, the songs are about the prospect of people having to find new directions in their lives. In these trying times every word relays the truth.


    So The Circle, then, like all of Bon Jovi's best music, stares down the troubles that afflict our lives, and offers a bracing vision for overcoming those obstacles. It's stirring, and it's an emotion that, strong as the album is, will find its most convincing expression on the concert stage. And this is why Bon Jovi have managed to play over 2600 concerts to over 34 million fans in over 50 countries. I can't believe I'm even saying this, but I can't wait to go on the road again, Jon Bon Jovi exclaims.

    1. We Weren't Born to Follow
    2. When We Were Beautiful
    3. Work for the Working Man
    4. Superman Tonight
    5. Bullet
    6. Thorn in My Side
    7. Live Before You Die
    8. Brokenpromiseland
    9. Love's the Only Rule
    10. Fast Cars
    11. Happy Now
    12. Learn to Love
    Bon Jovi
    $34.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • No Love Deep Web No Love Deep Web Quick View

    $25.99
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    No Love Deep Web

    Death Grips shocked the world and their record label when they released their second release of the year No Love Deep Web, but upon listening it's pretty clear that this is a mixtape that the label had no intention of releasing. No Love Deep Web was probably just an elaborate way to hype up the band, and it's safe to say it worked. No Love Deep Web had over 34.2 million downloads on BitTorrent thanks to the help of Twitter, and I think its safe to say their plan worked. Speaking of the album itself, it employs very minimalistic stripped down beats and has a much chiller vibe overall compared to the previous two records. That doesn't mean the beats are soft though, because they are harder than the phallus on the album cover. No Love Deep Web is one big grimy middle finger to the music industry and one of the most sordid albums ever released by a group on a major label.


    This isn't your father's hip hop, but that should be common knowledge by now. If you go into this expecting insightful lyrics and smooth flow over catchy beats you're going to have a bad time, hell even if you expect to understand the lyrics most of the time you're going to get very little out of No Love Deep Web. MC Ride is his schizophrenic self on tracks like No Love and World Of Dogs, but he also comes down to earth and actually calms down a bit on tracks like Artificial Death In The West adding a lot more depth to their sound. The whole album feels like the fever dreams of a severely withdrawn drug addict, tracks like World Of Dogs, No Love and Hunger Games sound like a sick drug addicts crash back down to earth and their gritty existence. The line I got some *** to say just for the *** of it perfectly encapsulates not only MC Ride's style, but No Love Deep Web, and Death Grips' whole career.


    The beats on this thing are raw and stripped down, some of the tracks don't even have a melody some of the time, just drums and vocals like in Lock Your Doors. The beats are fidgety electronic bells and whistles, lots of interesting sounds and synths creating a gritty atmosphere for MC Ride to spit his insane lyrics over. The rawness and harsh production of the beats help point to the fact that this is a mixtape and not a studio release, the minimalistic approach also creates a fresh sound compared to the over produced and at times gimmicky production on The Money Store, and this approach will likely convert a few people who were not fond of the over the top nature of The Money Store.


    No Love Deep Web inevitably sounds a tad rushed, no *** it was made in only a few months, but it definitely did its job as a hype generator. It doesn't do enough different to warrant its early release date and the band's sound is getting a bit tiring. The main problem though is the lack of standout tracks, with most of the hooks gone and with such stripped down beats a lot of the songs blend together in an unflattering way. Exhausting as it can be at times, No Love Deep Web turned out to be another great addition to Death Grips' ever expanding discography that is likely to turn a few heads just as all of their previous work has done.

    - Robert Lowe (Sputnik Music)

    1. Come Up And Get Me
    2. Lil Boy
    3. No Love
    4. Black Dice
    5. World Of Dogs
    6. Lock Your Doors
    7. Whammy
    8. Hunger Games
    9. Deep Web
    10. Stockton
    11. Pop
    12. Bass Rattle Stars Out The Sky
    Death Grips
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Violent Sleep Of Reason The Violent Sleep Of Reason Quick View

    $27.99
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    The Violent Sleep Of Reason

    Pressed On Grey / Black Splatter


    Limited To 1000 Copies


    The Violent Sleep of Reason, the band's eighth full-length studio album, finds MESHUGGAH building upon their legacy for fearless metal sculpting within the context of extreme metal, but also recapturing some of the magic and excitement specifically within the aspect of performance, finding flow and groove that would be a challenge for any lesser band to locate, given such technical geometric madness at mischievous hand.


    "There's a distinct methodology", says drummer, writer and spokesman for the band Tomas Haake, that was put into motion to help the band achieve the level of "intensity" the attentive fan will feel as he/she makes their way through The Violent Sleep of Reason.


    For this one, it's all live takes, with either 3 or 4 of the band members recording their respective instruments simultaneously - which is a way of recording they haven't used in many years. And that definitely goes against the stream of what you see in most technical metal nowadays, where editing, drum programming, the use of "beat detectives" etc. is a way more common approach to recording. So on this one, MESHUGGAH went back towards a more old-school approach, properly rehearsing the songs as a whole band before going into studio to record them. Jens was in one room, guitarists were in one room, bass player Dick was sitting right next to the drum set with an amplifier/cab in the next room. So in that sense this is more "old school"; the methodology is in that sense more like what bands were doing in the '80s and 90s. "And that vibrancy comes out", says Haake; "it's a very audible difference, sloppier sounding if you will, but at the same time it brings a different energy than the last few albums - this is "less perfect", but in that sense, also more alive."


    The personal challenge taken on by the band produced fortunate byproducts as well, or, rather, it inspired them to "de-machine" other aspects of the technical MESHUGGAH juggernaut.


    "Yes, for this one we also changed our approach toward the guitar recording/sounds," explains Haake, who nonetheless confirms that the band is still using eight-string axes, and for the most part, tuning down half a step to achieve that torrid MESHUGGAH guitar grunt. "The last few albums have been mostly digital, guitar sounds-wise, using all digital guitar gear as opposed to analog tube amps and regular cabs. The upside of using all digital like we did previous, is you can re-amp it afterwards, as it's basically a clean signal so you can pick, choose, and tweak things at a later point. But with this album, it was six speakers, all separately miked in one (super-loud) room, each cabinet with a different head -Marshall, Orange, Mesa Boogie etc-and then mixing it up a little bit depending on the song. If there was a song that was a little slower and sludgier, we might add more of the Orange amp to get a tad more of that stoner sound. And if it's a bit more metal, we'd maybe use the Marshall head or the Mesa head a little more in the mix. So we did have the opportunity, to mix and match for each song so the guitar sound is not exactly the same for every song. And that's a difference from Koloss and obZen, for example, where pretty much every song had the same drum and guitar sound."


    But the end result is still a relentless onslaught of MESHUGGAH -patented ideas, save for one gorgeous and atmospheric respite, at the close of "Stifled."


    Framing the pacing and contours of record, Tomas says, "None of the songs stick out quite like, for example, the way "Bleed" did on obZen. To me, it doesn't really have hits-it just has really cool songs! Not that we ever really had "hits" though (laughs). They're just maybe a little "wilder" sounding on this album, much due also to the live recording approach. Dick and I wrote about half of the material, and the rest was either me and Mårten working together or Mårten writing on his own. We were kind of going for something nuts as is the case with all our writing/recording albums - We wanted to hear something that we hadn't heard ourselves do before." Fredrik was not part of the songwriting for this one, as he's been hard at work on his next solo album, but as always he was still very involved with every aspect of the recording, from recording rhythm guitars, guitar solos etc . "And that's also a completely new thing," continues Tomas. "Dick was never involved in the songwriting prior to this album, whereas Fredrik always was. And that, of course, creates a difference in the way the album as a whole came out."


    At the lyrical end, highlights include the title track, which, set to a massively heavy arch-djent rhythm, speaks of "the violent outcome of not dealing with what is going on, the violent implications of being asleep. "The title is actually inspired by a Goya painting called 'The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters.'"


    A second highlight is strident opener and longest song on the album, "Clockworks," which is strafed by a typically super-human drum performance from Haake. "That's more about looking to yourself and who you are and things you want to change about yourself. And then in the context of how your mind works, as a clockwork. It's the idea of taking out all the little pins, wheels, and springs and kind of rebuilding it to make you function in a different fashion. So lyrics for that song is a look in on self, at things that you wish that you could change about yourself."


    Listen to tracks like the vertigo-inducing "Nostrum" and the slower if equally circular and note-dense "By the Ton," and it's easy to understand why it's been four years since a MESHUGGAH album. But mind-numbing complexity of the material is not the only reason, explains Haake.


    "No, well, I would say first of all, it takes us a lot of time to write. And we're very bad at focusing; we're very bad at multitasking. I don't think we ever wrote one single riff on a tour bus or in a hotel room. So if you have a touring cycle of two, two-and-a-half, three years, there's not going to be anything written in that time period. And that's just how we all function. We need to have a break, like, okay, time out now-nothing else for a year. We need to write for one year. But you also want to tour as much as possible for an album. Koloss, for example, we toured for like two-and-a-half years. And then you write. And when we do finally write, we scrutinize those songs, riffs, structures over and over and over, and change things as we go. So in a lot of the songs, maybe only one riff was actually there originally. So writing for us does take a long time, no doubt."


    As a result, the band's erudite and intelligent fan base "get something that they don't really hear in any other bands". On the first album you still hear a lot of Metallica and Anthrax and Bay Area kind of thrash metal influence. "We knew that we sounded a bit like that, but we were aiming for something we hadn't heard in any other band. And that's still the main fuel. We're not trying to write your average metal song. We're not trying to write catchy songs. We're not trying to write hit songs (laughs). We're just trying to write something that is cool, that we haven't heard before, and hopefully our fans haven't heard before. And that also gets harder and harder though, because by now, there are so many awesome musicians and bands and so much great music out there. But it would seem like the followers that we do have, the people that have kept buying our albums and stayed with us for a lot of years, are not necessarily the typical metal fans. The crowd we have is diverse. We have a lot of geeks and nerds and weirdos, and they are beautiful ones, you know? We have a lot of people with talent, and a lot of people that are also interested in music as art, and not just an event."


    But it's not lost on Tomas that MESHUGGAH is making daunting progressive music, music where melody is subservient to jackhammer rhythm, as evidenced by the way that even his lead singer, Jens Kidman, is situated within the maelstrom that is MESHUGGAH


    "He's the perfect tool for the job. Just like most people, we all, of course, like music where there's "proper singing", and we all love a great singer. Personally, I think the voice is the most empathic instrument. You hear someone sing and you're like, oh my God, that's the coolest instrument in the world. But at the same time, what we're trying to do is not that. Just like the guitars and me as a drummer, Jens also is a rhythmic tool, one that adds aggression, as well as words to back up that aggression if you will."


    So would Tomas then acquiesce to the idea of MESHUGGAH as metal's reigning enemies of melody?


    "In a sense, yeah. I mean, there is definitely melody and a lot of melodic thought put into tonalities, harmonies between bass and guitars and things like that, but at the same time, we're not often going for anything pretty. Sometimes there's a little bit, where we go, 'Awww, that's beautiful," but then we usually immediately mess it up again. You give it a little bit of something "nice" sometimes, but basically we're not going for niceness (laughs)."


    Produced by Meshuggah; engineered by Tue Madsen, Puk Studios, Kaerby, Denmark.

    1. Clockworks
    2. Born In Dissonance
    3. MonstroCity
    4. By The Ton
    5. Violent Sleep Of Reason
    6. Ivory Tower
    7. Stifled
    8. Nostrum
    9. Our Rage Won't Die
    10. Into Decay
    Meshuggah
    $27.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • What A Way To Die What A Way To Die Quick View

    $24.99
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    What A Way To Die

    The archetype for the '60s-era girl group was etched indelibly into stone, like a commandment: three pretty girls with matching outfits and bouffant hairdos would sing, with musical backing supplied by a bunch of guys standing in the shadows. The Quatro sisters shattered that archetype forever with the Pleasure Seekers, an all-girl teenage rock & roll group who played all the instruments themselves and were fully capable of wiping the stage with any male band that crossed their path.


    The Quatro girls had been brought up in a musically-minded family, nurtured with classical piano and vocal lessons. As Patti recalls, "By 1964, I had been taking guitar lessons, hanging with musicians in the local music scene. We had seen a Beatles concert, and I was quite dazed and focused at the event, watching the audience cry and scream out of control. It was my epiphany moment, and I was determined to start an all-girl band."
    Shortly thereafter, the first lineup of the Pleasure Seekers fell into place with Patti Quatro (lead guitar), Marylou Ball (rhythm guitar), Suzi Quatro (bass), Diane Baker (keyboards), Nan Ball (drums) and vocal duties shared by all. Around the fall of 1965 the girls dared local teen club manager Dave Leone to give them a slot at his popular Hideout Club, claiming they were better than most of the other live bands there. "You're on," responded Leone, "in two weeks. Three songs!"


    The Pleasure Seekers were soon a popular feature at the club, honing their skills alongside the likes of the Rationals, the Amboy Dukes and Bob Seger & the Last Heard. "In the beginning, there was a lot of skepticism," remembers Patti, "especially the first night. The boys crowded the stage, the girlfriends pulled them away with laughter, as if 'Girls playing?! Yeah, right!' It was always satisfying to see them be silenced quickly when we began playing. We grew used to seeing slack jaws open in surprise." Next they were asked by Leone to record and release a single on his Hideout label.


    That March 1966 release is now regarded as the greatest "girl garage" single of the era: "Never Thought You'd Leave Me" b/w "What a Way to Die." "Dave brought lyrics, and we put the songs together quickly," remembers Patti. "We felt very legit in making this record at a small local studio. Nan was the sexy voice on 'Never Thought You'd Leave Me,' and there was lots of laughter as Marylou added the screams on 'What a Way to Die.'" Suzi Quatro remembers the recording as "very important and memorable."


    The Pleasure Seekers were soon in demand in the region, playing teen clubs, parties, colleges and local TV shows. After a series of lineup changes, the band brought in older Quatro sister Arlene (keyboards) and Darline Arnone (drums), the first female drummer sponsored by Slingerland Drums. A short time later, Pami Benford joined-up on guitar and bass (that lineup lasting through most of 1968). "It was a very versatile group," remembers Patti, "with Pami and Suzi sharing bass, and Pami and I sharing lead and rhythm guitars."


    "The gender bias was my hot button," recalls Arlene, "along with confidence in our musical abilities. With women musicians dismissed as a novelty, I delighted in watching the audience go from skepticism/ridicule, to shock/cheers." For Suzi, though, this period was where she learned her craft: "I considered myself a musician, and didn't really think about gender too much." Two tracks recorded in 1967, but unissued at the time, "Elevator Express" and "Gotta Get Away," highlight the band's growing musical maturity since their Hideout debut. "Detroit was the best learning ground in the world for musicians," recalls Suzi, "with an amazing energy and creativity that is in every successful artist that has come out of the city." "We were actually one of the earliest Detroit bands traveling the country," adds Patti. "Everyone wanted this unusual all girl band who rocked an entire Motown revue (changing instruments and singers throughout) and an entire Sgt. Pepper/Magical Mystery Tour revue, as well as covering English bands, acid rock and everything in between."


    Signing up with Associated Booking Corporation, the group began making the transition from local to national act. Producer Dick Corby caught the Pleasure Seekers at Trude Heller's in New York's Greenwich Village and signed them to a Mercury Records deal in early 1968. To keep rein on their finances in NYC, Patti recalls, "We booked Arthur's nightclub for a month, staying at the infamous rock Gorham Hotel, recording by day-playing by night." Also in residence were the Who, the Blues Magoos and an assortment of other bands. "Hitting NYC as young teens, it was exciting, scary, fun-all emotions churning," she continues. "We felt we had hit the big time, going from the tiny local Hideout session to the huge Mercury professional studio facility, complete with session people adding strings and other elements."


    A single pairing "Good Kind of Hurt" and "Light of Love" was released in April 1968, while a third song, "Locked in Your Love," remained in the can. The group then headed out to the Northwest for a lengthy tour. "The Northwest tour was awesome," remembers Patti. "We were billed with Canned Heat, Boyce & Hart and Merilee Rush, and were held over six weeks to tour with Eric Burdon and the Animals. The Mercury single was out, momentum was surging." Both sides of the single were getting airplay, but ultimately it failed to gain any traction. "Really neither song reflected our own sound," admits Patti. "We rearranged 'Light of Love' for live performance, feeling disconnected to the record, yet realizing we had to play ball with the executives to keep us rolling."


    Ultimately Mercury's vision for the Pleasure Seekers clashed rather sharply with the band's vision. "The suits wanted tits and ass," recalls Darline, "wowing Vegas crowds, playing tinkly tunes in lavish costumes." "In that male-dominated music era, we were strictly a novelty, and a high-risk endeavor," adds Patti. "The record executives felt women musicians would fall in love or get pregnant so were not worth investing the time and money. We had to kick down many doors. We were serious musicians, and in it for the right reasons. In the end, we were not happy with a forced direction that Mercury Records had in mind, and ended up leaving the label to rock our music in our own fashion."


    After a memorable 1968 Far East tour, playing for wounded returning American soldiers from Vietnam, the Pleasure Seekers (with new drummer Nancy Rogers) returned to a Detroit that was now, in Patti's words, "exploding with heavier sounds. That sparked us to change direction with new ideas we had been exploring. Arlene left the band and we brought in our youngest sister Nancy (vocals). With Suzi's Joplinesque vocals combined with Nancy's wailing 'female Robert Plant' style, we enjoyed a harder edged, 'double-punch' effect."


    The last four songs on the album, "White Pig Blues," "Brain Confusion," "Where Have You Gone?" and the atmospheric psychedelic mover "Mr. Power," all date from this 1968-69 period when the Pleasure Seekers were playing the Grande Ballroom alongside the MC5, Alice Cooper, the Stooges, the Amboy Dukes and SRC. With this change in musical direction and the departure of Arlene and Pami, the band forged on as Cradle. Suzi Quatro departed for England in 1971, launching a successful solo career. Patti and Nancy continued with Cradle until 1973 when Patti joined another pioneering female rock group, Fanny.


    The Pleasure Seekers reunited recently in April 2012 (minus Suzi) for a well-received show in their hometown, where they were inducted into Detroit's Hall of Fame. "I think all of us Quatro girls are extremely proud of our pioneering days" reflects Patti. "In a renaissance-era of music, we kicked down doors for women to rock heavy. There were key times in our lives of making decisions that may have turned us towards larger fame, but less happiness-depending on your philosophy of such things. The Pleasure Seekers could have been a Las Vegas show act bringing in buckets of money or on Motown, turned very formulaic girlie-soul. But we stayed true to our goals, and I don't think any of us have any regrets of staying our course and playing the music that moved us. It's all been a thrilling ride with great memories."


    - Mike & Anja Stax (Ugly Things magazine)

    1. Intro By DJ The Lord
    2. Gotta Get Away
    3. Never Thought You'd Leave Me
    4. Light Of Love
    5. Good Kind Of Hurt
    6. What A Way To Die
    7. Elevator Express
    8. Locked In Your Love
    9. White Pig Blues
    10. Brain Confusion
    11. Where Have You Gone
    12. Mr. Power
    The Pleasure Seekers
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Absolute Zero Absolute Zero Quick View

    $19.99
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    Absolute Zero

    Absolute Zero is the debut album by Irish quintet, Little Green Cars. Absolute Zero's 48 minutes, crafted in unabashed earnestness with the aid of seasoned epic-producer Markus Dravs (Mumford and Sons' Sigh No More and Babel, Arcade Fire's Neon Bible and The Suburbs, Coldplay's Mylo Xyloto), acts as a soul-bearing report, as guileless as the young five-piece themselves, on the act of simply growing up; a process that requires, at once, so little and so much effort it could explode you from the inside at any moment.


    "This record constantly jumps between two contrasting perspectives: the beauty of a reckless youth and the fear and confusion caused by our ever-pending adulthood," Appleby explains. "It's a hopeful and naïve look at love and life in general, which gives the album its bright days - but also deals with isolation, unrequited love and madness. We wanted to express both a feeling of strength and vulnerability, so the work had to encompass both the light and dark."


    "These are all feelings we've had, as a group or as individuals. We hope this is something people can relate to. That's always been why music has been written; it's a voice for people who don't have a voice. Hopefully someone can find some sort of comfort or solace in this. "


    The band -a group of 20-year-old friends with a habit of waxing deadly serious about their ever-expanding ambitions - convened in 2008 in a bungalow in Stevie Appleby's parents' backyard for as ordinary a reason as any: as the frontman admits sheepishly, they wanted to win a battle of the bands competition. With guitarist Adam O'Regan and bassist Donagh O'Leary friends since primary school, and the rest having met in secondary, the five rehearsed for the gig, at which they promptly lost out to another local band.


    The defeat, however, was surprisingly fuel enough. It inspired them to work harder, to work through their remaining two years of school, during which they produced a massive catalog of demo recordings, blending acoustic and electronic, classical and punk, djembe drums and synth strings. Then, in 2010, not long before graduation, then-rising manager Daniel Ryan found them at one of their sparse live gigs. With just one client already under his wing, he approached the young band with a terrifying, yet exhilarating ultimatum: Do you want to go to university, or do you want to really be in a band?


    "That was the first time we considered looking that far ahead," says guitarist/vocalist/primary songwriter Faye O'Rourke. "We were trying to avoid thinking about the future because of the prospect of college, but " The choice became obvious. And like that, they dove in. For two years they redoubled their efforts, crafting a wide-eyed musical narrative that mirrored their evolution as an ensemble until, inevitably, label suitors began to knock. Since 2011 they've been quietly boiling down those demos into an album - the first they've ever recorded.


    "The main thing I want to hear out of an artist I admire is the truth," says Appleby. "How they really felt. If I'm going to say something, it may as well be the truth." The lengths to which Appleby, O'Rourke and the rest of the band will go to tell that truth have yet to reveal their depth, but a full-steam-ahead debut record is a good place to start. Finally, five years' worth of backyard Garage Band tracks have a name: Absolute Zero.


    The songs of Absolute Zero have only begun to see the light of day, because, as Appleby puts it, "we've always been more interested in recording and writing and experimenting with everything than in touring. [The past five years] was time spent finding our sound, finding ourselves. We've gone through everything, from acoustic guitars to electronic music. We needed the time to grow up as people and as musicians."


    In other words, this is a debut that is a sum total of its creators' ascent to this moment. It is a desperate, under-pillow diary; a painstakingly lettered love note dropped in a locker; a collective, yet very personal, dissertation. On the record's debut single The John Wayne, a fierce paean to the ones who so easily break our hearts, the lot of them proclaim, "It's easy to fall in love with you/It's easy to be alone/It's easy to hate yourself when all your love is inside someone else." On "My Love Took Me Down To The River To Silence Me," O'Rourke is torn between the heartbreak and the healing that comes from being heartbroken, "But my heart burned out til it was no more/still I wait on the ground, I don't know what for/There is a heart in you/where is the heart in me?/This love's killing me, but I want it to." And by its early-morning close, when Appleby asks, "And who will write and who will fight for this man/I know I am?/And if you're running out of space/Please don't erase your time with me," it becomes clear that it's not just love Little Green Cars are grasping at: even amidst an ex-lover's plea for acknowledgement, the search has grown far beyond that.

    1. Harper Lee
    2. Angel Owl
    3. My Love Took Me Down to The River to Silence Me
    4. The Consequences of Not Sleeping
    5. Big Red Dragon
    6. Red and Blue
    7. The Kitchen Floor
    8. The John Wayne
    9. Please
    10. Them
    11. Goodbye Blue Monday
    Little Green Cars
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Cryptocracy (Awaiting Repress) Cryptocracy (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $24.99
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    Cryptocracy (Awaiting Repress)

    From the metal-hewn flatlands of Finland comes a dark new force in electronic music. Forged in the electrical fire of industrial; nurtured through the apocalyptic feedback of art-rock, experimental and all things disruptive; and championed by the most influential names in EDM and beyond, Huoratron is deeper, stranger and harder-core than whatever came before it.


    Huoratron came to life in 2003, the brainchild of DJ/producer/mad 8-bit scientist Aku Raski. His sinister vision has taken form in just a few releases: some material for Finnish label New Judas, including the proactively aggressive Prevenge EP, containing angry blip-fest $$ Troopers and Corporate Occult, a slice of electro-house gone horribly awry. A set of remixes that changed H.I.M.'s In Venere Veritas from a jangly bit of radio rock to a doomed ride aboard a haunted 747 and M.I.A.'s Internet Connection from her usual minimal-funky hoedown to a sizzling nuclear rain storm.


    After resigning to Last Gang in 2010, Raski hit the studio, emerging a year later with Cryptocracy, his first full-length album. To be blatantly honest I do not personally feel a close resemblance to many, if any artist within my scene, Raski explains. This is mostly because I'm driven by my own vigorous motivation and do what I do despite associations made by others. I mean no disrespect by this. It is simply a fact that I, as an artist am in the center of the storm and feel content there.


    Cryptocracy is a journey of destruction, driven by chip synths, distortion and gut-punching bass. Recognizable sounds peak their heads out occasionally: a house riff on Transcendence, a dubstep pass on Sea of Meat, stripped-down techno on A699F. But they're swallowed up by an apocalyptic wave; the noises, textures and sonic sneak attacks that are Huoratron's signature, born more from a feeling than a particular genre focus.

    1. Cryptocracy
    2. New Wave of Mutilation
    3. A699F
    4. Bug
    5. Dungeons & Dragons
    6. Sea of Meat
    7. Top 1%
    8. Force Majeure
    9. Transcendence
    10. Unblinking Eye
    Huoratron
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Deja Entendu (Out Of Stock) Deja Entendu (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $28.99
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    Deja Entendu (Out Of Stock)


    Huge Demand For Vinyl Pressing Of The Classic Release From Brand New


    Gatefold Jacket With Original Artwork


    Pressed On 180 Gram Black Vinyl


    As the popularity of emo and punk-pop plateaued, many bands had a lot to prove to stay in the game. As of 2003, Brand New had sidestepped any notion that they'd be stuck in the prototypical mold found on Your Favorite Weapon. Unlike their debut, Deja Entendu isn't all about bitter breakups and doesn't fall into a permanent punk-pop hole. Produced by Steven Haigler (Pixies, Quicksand), this sophomore effort finds Brand New maturing, reaching for textures and song structures instead of clichÉs. They still, however, alternate their full-on blasts with slower acoustic work, which doesn't hurt. Many antiromantic lyrics such as my tongue is the only muscle on my body that works harder than my heart saturate the [album], but there's still some resentment with downers such as I hope you come down with something they can't diagnose and don't have a cure for. The Quiet Things That No One Ever Knows is one of the stronger tracks and isn't so much a fresh entry as it is a rewrite of their semihit Jude Law and a Semester Abroad. It's not quite dÉjà vu; it's just consistent. -Kenyon Hopkin (All Music Guide)

    LP 1
    1. Tautou
    2. Sic Transit Gloria...Glory Fades
    3. I Will Play My Game Beneath The Spin Light
    4. Okay, I believe You But my Tommy Gun Don't
    5. The Quiet Things That No One Ever Knows
    6. The Boy Who Blocked His Own Shot


    LP 2
    1. Jaws Theme Swimming
    2. Me Vs. Maradonna Vs. Elvis
    3. Guernica
    4. Good To Know That I Ever Need Attention
    5. Play Crack The Sky

    Brand New
    $28.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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