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  • Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner) Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
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    Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner)

    It was clear from the start that Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, with its air of solemnity in the final chorus, which calls for brotherly love just as the New Year comes in, would become a musical part of our world's cultural legacy. Hundreds of minds, Beethoven researcher Karl Nef prophesied, have been set in motion by this music in the most varied ways, and it will continue not only to bestow pleasure upon countless thousands, but also to stimulate mental life right at the most fundamental level.



    There are certainly only a very few truly cerebral interpretations which stand out from the fathomless mass of recordings. One of those upon which "The Absolute Sound" journal has stamped its coveted seal of approval is the recording with Georg Solti and his perfectly honed symphony musicians from Chicago. Here, this usually somewhat daring baton-wielder plumbs the very depths of the score and allows Beethoven's rich abundance of ideas to ferment into a great whole.



    The four soloists prove their worth as first choice for the richly detailed and balanced synopsis of this fissured work. They captivate us as much in the solo as in the group singing with their natural and expressive intonation. The dry, very present sound highlights the fact that this is an artistic performance at the highest level.




    Musicians:



    • Pilar Lorengar, Stuart Burrows, and other soloists

    • The Chicago Symphony Chorus & Orchestra

    • Sir Georg Solti (conductor)




    Recording: May 1972 in the Krannert Centre of the University of Illinois, Chicago, by Kenneth Wilkinson and Gordon Parry

    Production: David Harvey



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    Ludwig Van Beethoven
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner) The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner)

    After the break-up of John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in the summer of 1967, the time seemed ripe for Peter Green, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood to take their leave from raw British rock 'n' roll. The newly established band Fleetwood Mac first turned to black blues, and their art of playing was so similar to that of other groups that the magazine Eye criticised them for their »almost ridiculous mimicry«. However, their choice of performance style took them in the right direction and in 1969, the year in which The Pious Bird Of Good Omen appeared, they landed at the top end of the pop charts, even ahead of The Beatles and Stevie Wonder.



    Of course, in the cover version of Little Willie John's Need Your Love So Bad, which is treated with a velvety string sound, and other bluesy songs, the American influence still makes itself heard, but not without success! The highly individual sound of the group comes best through in the now legendary numbers such as the weightless, gliding Albatross and Black Magic Woman with its Latin and blues elements. Judged the best British blues ever to be played (allmusic.com), one can now sit back and enjoy this great album.



    Musicians:



    • Peter Green (guitar, vocal)

    • Jeremy Spencer (guitar, piano, vocal)

    • Danny Kirwan (guitar)

    • Eddie Boyd (piano, vocal)

    • Big Walter Horton (harmonica)

    • John McVie (bass)

    • Mick Fleetwood (drums)




    Recorded between September 1967 and October 1968 by Mike Ross

    Production: Mike Vernon





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Need Your Love So Bad
    2. Comin' Home
    3. Rambling Pony
    4. The Big Boat
    5. I Believe My Time Ain't Long
    6. The Sun Is Shining
    7. Albatross
    8. Black Magic Woman
    9. Just The Blues
    10. Jigsaw Puzzle Blues
    11. Looking For Somebody
    12. Stop Messin' Round

    Fleetwood Mac
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bruckner: Symphony No. 5 / Mozart: Symphony No. 36 (Speakers Corner) Bruckner: Symphony No. 5 / Mozart: Symphony No. 36 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
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    Bruckner: Symphony No. 5 / Mozart: Symphony No. 36 (Speakers Corner)

    Eugen Jochum was a modest man who did not use the media to draw attention to himself but rather to document his musical intentions. And right from the very beginning he focussed on magnitude. Aged only 23, he made his debut in Munich with Bruckner's Symphony No. 7 and so laid the foundations for his lifelong devotion to the Austrian composer's works, as is demonstrated by his complete recording of the Symphonies that was made during the years 1958-1967. The present account of the Fifth Symphony was recorded roughly half way through his thorough exploration and study of Bruckner's symphonic works. From the very beginning, the Concertgebouw Orchestra strides majestically towards the Finale with its sonorous brass sound in the chorale, and fugal sections. A divine atmosphere is guaranteed - quite literally - by the work being performed in the hallowed halls of the Benedictine Abbey in Ottobeuren to celebrate its foundation 1200 years ago.



    Jochum's fresh and scholarly account of Mozart's "Linz" Symphony reminds us of his superb mastery of the Viennese Classics. The music, which ranges from festive cheerfulness to abrupt gloominess, is resolutely conducted - with the happy result that the hackneyed image of Jochum as an otherworldly specialist of the Romantic era is completely abolished. Measured against the conductor's self-concept as a universal medium for expressing the ideas of the great maestros, the present recording is a befitting portrait of his superb versatility on the rostrum.





    Recording: May 1964 at Benedictiner Abbey, Ottobeuren, Germany, by Henk Jansen

    Production: Jaap van Ginneke



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 5 in B flat major
    2. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Symphony No. 36 in C major, K.425 (Linz)
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $69.99
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    x

    At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress)

    Many critics regard Dave Brubeck's Carnegie Hall concert from February 1963 as his greatest ever live appearance. But who can really determine that? For no one - apart from Brubeck himself - would have seen and heard his conservatively estimated 12,000 concerts.



    Although the twelve titles had already been released on LPs that had been recorded in the studio, these records were certainly not known to all those in the audience. In between the numbers on each LP, Brubeck made little 'advertising spots' in short comments, but with such charm and wit that one really cannot be angry with him.



    The concert programme begins with St. Louis Blues and ends with Take Five. Luckily, the solos are distributed among all the musicians, so that Paul Desmond and Joe Morello - whose prowess on this evening can only be called 'amazingly good' - justifiably received enthusiastic applause from both the audience and us alike. Castilian Drums demonstrates Morello's wealth of ideas and his grandiose feeling for rhythm; though short, Paul Desmond's solos (Southern Scene is a good example!) are compelling, highly melodic, lyrical and possess a unique tone - as such they are immediately recognisable.



    How fortunate that the twelve brilliantly improvised numbers are now available once again on vinyl, having been recorded live at the legendary Carnegie Hall 60 years ago.



    Musicians:



    • Dave Brubeck (piano)

    • Paul Desmond (alto saxophone)

    • Eugene Wright (bass)

    • Joe Morello (drums)


    Recording: February 1963 Carnegie Hall, New York

    Production: Teo Macero



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    St. Louis Blues
    Bossa Nova U.S.A.
    For All We Know
    Pennies From Heaven
    Southern Scene
    Three To Get Ready
    Eleven Four
    King For A Day
    Castillian Drums
    It's A Raggy Waltz
    Blue Rondo A La Turk
    Take Five
    Dave Brubeck
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Beethoven: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra (Speakers Corner) Beethoven: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Beethoven: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra (Speakers Corner)

    Beethoven's only violin concerto is certainly one of the most lovely works ever written for this instrument. The symphonically conceived work is admired for its highly lyrical and expressive character and as such belongs in the repertory of all great violinists. Numerous performances, often all too sentimental or exaggerated, are available on record - but this Deutsche Grammophon production from 1962 is a refreshing exception. With a tender, serene timbre and perfect intonation, the soloist Wolfgang Schneiderhan allows the spirit of the score to breathe throughout. The captivating and poetic music is further enhanced by the Berlin Philharmonic who play with a sonority that has yet to be equalled. The strings with the swell and subsidence of their carpets of sound, the subtle and finely balanced woodwinds, the double basses which murmur darkly at the very bottom of their register - all effuse a feeling of consecration and peaceful transfiguration in this concerto, a concerto which has never seen its like in two centuries.



    The balance engineers achieved a remarkable feat when documenting this epoch-making work, for this recording is certainly one of the very best to come from Deutsche Grammophon in the Sixties.



    Recording: May / July 1962 at the Jesus-Christus-Kirche, Berlin by GÜnter Hermanns / Production: Wolfgang Lohse



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    Beethoven: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra
    Wolfgang Schneiderhan and the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Eugen Jochum
    Ludwig Van Beethoven
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Welcome (Speakers Corner) Welcome (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Welcome (Speakers Corner)

    Many of Santana's rock-addict fans could well have understood the inviting word Welcome on the white LP cover as an attempt to break away from the spiritual aura of his previous album Love Devotion Surrender. And the musicians certainly managed to produce a rich Latin feeling, with such titles as Samba De Sausalito and Yours Is The Light. But luckily their concessions did not alienate them from their die-hard fans in that they came up with a sort of copy of the rhythmical Caravanserai. They truly attempted something new. Encouraged by the success of the jazz-fusion formula created by Miles Davis and his disciples, Santana combined his virtuoso guitar playing with specially chosen electronic features. The amazingly acrobatic jazz vocalists Leon Thomas and Wendy Haas contributed complicated, quirky parts and the maestro himself vies with John McLaughlin in a dense conflict carried out on their instruments in Flame Sky. This is an album with a strong intellectual drive and offers the discerning listener a dazzling blend of Latin, jazz and fusion.



    Musicians:



    • Carlos Santana (guitar, vocals)

    • John McLaughlin (guitar)

    • Tom Coster (keyboards, vocals)

    • Jules Broussard (saxophone)

    • David Brown (bass)

    • Armando Peraza (percussion, vocals)

    • Mike Shrieve (drums)

    • Jose Chepito Areas (percussion)



    Recording: April - June 1973 by Glen Kolotkin

    Production: Carlos Santana, Maitreya Michael Shrieve and Tom Coster



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Going Home
    2. Love, Devotion, and Surrender
    3. Samba de Sausalito
    4. When I Look Into Your Eyes
    5. Yours Is the Light
    6. Mother Africa
    7. Light of Life
    8. Flame Sky
    9. Welcome
    Santana
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Rough And Ready (Speakers Corner) Rough And Ready (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Rough And Ready (Speakers Corner)

    Great talent and low morals well describes the groupie-loving and colleague-killing Jeff Beck - and no fear of denial! But this fast-paced life demanded its toll, which came in the form of a life-threatening car accident. The ace on the guitar was forced to retire for two years but returned to the scene full of vigour and with new musicians to launch the second Jeff Beck Group.
    Rough And Ready doesn't offer what might be expected from Brit Rock as far as a heavy sound or the boss's egomaniacal leaps on the guitar strings are concerned. Bob Tench opens the album with a surprisingly soulful sound and soaring falsetto in Get The Feeling. But then in the next number, Situation, we have crackling fire from the lead guitar and inventive solos - all easy-going and down-to-earth. Beck wouldn't tolerate routine rock: this is obvious from Max's Tune, in which developing melodies are hacked to pieces by the clash of cymbals. To round off the album, the band sings about Jody with constantly varying rhythms and fascinating harmonic twists, which genially and firmly find their way along the narrow path between sentiment and testosterone. So much roughness is a must!


    Musicians:



    • Jeff Beck (guitar)

    • Bob Tench (vocals)

    • Max Middelton (piano)

    • Clive Chaman (bass)

    • Cozy Powell (drums)



    Recording: April-July 1971 at Island Studios, London, by Jack Ashkinazy
    Production: Jeff Beck




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Got the Feeling
    2. Situation
    3. Short Business
    4. Max's Tune
    5. I've Been Used
    6. New Ways/Train Train
    7. Jody
    Jeff Beck Group
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Second Winter (Speakers Corner) Second Winter (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Second Winter (Speakers Corner)

    Johnny Winter released the album Second Winter, a passionate and fervent collection of songs, just a few months after his record debut. This legendary band's steadfast commitment to blues is apparent in every single note they play, although tender emotions are all the more discernible in hard, rock'n'roll-like outbursts than ever before. Winter blends his crystal-clear, unmannered guitar playing with the gravelly charm of his raspy voice to produce a compact sound in which both his own compositions and old favourites (Johnny B. Goode) are revived. It is quite clear that the white shooting star is on a par with the giants of blues as far as vocals and guitar playing are concerned.
    It is often speculated over as to whether Johnny's new ideas were simply too numerous for a single LP, or whether the producers thought they were not quite sufficient for a double LP. Whatever the answer, the original was released as a three-sided album, with a blank fourth side! In order to fill the album with fiery rock'n'roll, a new production with the 45 rpm versions of Miss Ann, Hustled Down In Texas, and Highway 61 Revisited is now included on the fourth side. It goes without saying that alongside the present double LP Winter's audiophile first release (Columbia CS 9826) is available from Speakers Corner, too.



    Musicians:



    • Johnny Winter (guitar, mandolin, vocal)

    • Edgar Winter (piano, alto saxophone, organ, harpsichord)

    • Tommy Shannon, Dennis Collins (bass)

    • 'Uncle' John Turner (percussion)



    Recording: 1969 by Ed Kollins

    Production: Johnny and Edgar Winter




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Memory Pain
    2. I'm Not Sure
    3. The Good Love
    4. Slippin' and Slidin'
    5. Miss Ann
    6. Johnny B. Goode
    7. Highway 61 Revisited
    8. I Love Everybody
    9. Hustled Down in Texas
    10. I Hate Everybody
    11. Fast Life Rider
    Johnny Winter
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Cheap Trick (Speakers Corner) Cheap Trick (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Cheap Trick (Speakers Corner)

    Cheap Trick proved to a thrilled audience that a band in the late seventies could stay in the limelight over many years without having to reinvent rock 'n' roll. Any band that wanted to survive as an opening act for such top bands as Queen, Kiss and Boston simply had to be either courageous, naive or give a really good show. That Cheap Trick brought their audience to boiling point in a suspiciously similar fashion to such groups as the Beatles, Hollies and Bee Gees, can now be relived by listening to their present debut album. The boys from Illinois realized that a special magic lay in their early numbers and perform here the very best titles from their earlier live acts, which are just as good in these days as in the past. They really get down to business with their »playful, perverse lyrics« (Crawdaddy), which deal with anything from delicate to precarious issues (Daddy Should Have Stayed In High School and He's A Whore). »Cheap Trick is not important for their great innovative qualities but for their considerable entertainment value«, wrote the critical music magazine Melody Maker. Old and new rock fans will revel in this album.



    Musicians:



    • Robin Zander, Rick Nielsen (vocal, guitar)

    • Tom Petersson (bass, vocal)

    • Bun E. Carlos (drums)




    Recording: 1976 by Jay Messina at The Record Plant, New York

    Production: Jack Douglas





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Hot Love
    2. Speak Now Or Forever Hold Your Peace
    3. He's A Whore
    4. Mandocello
    5. The Ballad Of T.V. Violence (I'm Not The Only Boy)
    6. Elo Kiddies
    7. Daddy Should Have Stayed In High School
    8. Taxman, Mr. Thief
    9. Cry, Cry
    10. Oh, Candy
    Cheap Trick
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sings the Blues (Speakers Corner) Sings the Blues (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Sings the Blues (Speakers Corner)

    In both her public and private life, Nina Simone was adamant about one thing, namely, what she simply would not tolerate. She sometimes complained about the miserable erotic prowess of her lovers, while at other times her audience were a target for her tongue. Sometimes she cancelled her performances at short notice and held a tirade against show business as such. In her music, rooted in gospel, she sought a path which took her down a middle course between jazz and pop, thus earning her the title of High Priestess Of Soul (as in the LP title) with her rock fans in the Sixties.



    The present blues album was recorded during what was undisputedly her most productive phase. It is a recording which does not swim with the tide of the times in that it does not employ massive forces or seek the twang of electrification. Instead Nina Simone's wonderfully sleek contralto voice bathes in the gentle timbre of an organ and a pithy, pulsating - but by no means stomping - rhythm. The cool, unemotional number "Sings The Blues" guarantees riveting tension and the authenticity of the genre which is, of course, the be all and end all of music for every black artist. Surely no compilation, no matter how carefully conceived, could possibly mark the diva's 70th birthday in February and sudden death in April 2203 better than this re-release.



    Musicians:



    • Nina Simone (piano, vocal)

    • Rudy Stevenson, Eric Gale (guitar)

    • Ernest Hayes (organ)

    • Bob Bushnell (bass)

    • Bernard Purdie (drums)





    Recording: 1967 by Ray Hall and Mickey Crofford at RCA Victor's Studio B, New York

    Production: Danny Davis




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Do I Move You
    2. Day And Night
    3. In The Dark
    4. Real Real
    5. My Man's Gone Now
    6. Backlash Blues
    7. I Want A Little Sugar In My Bowl
    8. Buck
    9. Since I Fell For You
    10. The House Of The Rising Sun
    11. Blues For Mama
    Nina Simone
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • In Hollywood (Speakers Corner) In Hollywood (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    In Hollywood (Speakers Corner)

    When stringed instruments are employed, it is often an indication that the protagonist is somewhat mature. It is an unwritten law that sooner or later every rock, jazz or folk musician will bathe in soft tones for once. Chet Atkins, however, was light years away from his artistic zenith, came up with a wealth of ideas and was in a great position with regards to recording facilities when he set down his Hollywood album in 1959. Two years earlier, "Mister Guitar" had become boss of the newly founded RCA Studio in Nashville. Here he recorded several records, which reflected his ideas of an appealing, catchy Nashville Sound as an answer to the declining rock and roll.


    The Hollywood numbers were by no means dynamite movie tracks or showstoppers. Dennis Farnon's delicate, lush arrangements rather more pay homage to the maestro with his no-frills art of playing. The gentle Italo evergreen Santa Lucia, Chaplin's beautiful Limelight with its violins and the time-honoured Greensleeves - all of them flawlessly performed - are a real pleasure for the ears. Atkins greatly admired the superb string orchestra and two years later he re-recorded the album using the tapes from the Hollywood session to create this new version.

    Musicians:



    • Chet Atkins (guitar)
    • Howard Roberts (guitar)
    • Jethro Burns (mandolin)
    • Clifford Hils (bass)
    • George Callender (bass)
    • Larry Bunker (drum & strings)
    • Jack Sperling(drum & strings)


    Recording: October 1958 in Hollywood

    Production: Chet Atkins




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    1. Armen's Theme
    2. Let It Be Me
    3. Theme From Picnic
    4. Theme From A Dream
    5. Estrelita
    6. Jitterbug Waltz
    7. Little Old Lady
    8. Limelight
    9. The Three Bells
    10. Santa Lucia
    11. Greensleeves
    12. Meet Mr. Callaghan
    Chet Atkins
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Transformer (Speakers Corner) Transformer (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Transformer (Speakers Corner)

    Ranked 194/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

    It is well known that comparisons seldom get to the root of the matter, but in the case of Lou Reed, for example, they certainly reveal the unassuredness of those people who made them. Is he or isn't he the Chuck Berry or Sergeant Pepper of the Seventies, or is he deliberately building up an image of himself as an ultra-sensitive Frankenstein, who lived out his neuroses and drug trips in horrific sound? Some records are so unbelievably repulsive, raged the magazine Rolling Stone, that one would best like to take physical revenge on the artists who commit such offences.



    The album Transformer, however, can by no means be classified as a case of 'acoustic bodily harm'. It appeared just a few months after the somewhat unsuccessful appearance of Lou Reed's fairly underground first release and rocketed straight into the charts. This production had two British guardian angels to help it on its way, namely David Bowie and Mick Ronson, both of whom obviously knew how to steer Reed's songwriting qualities into safe waters, without watering down his biting sarcasm and humorous provocation.
    And that's why grating guitar rock (Vicious) is found alongside a bittersweet, tender ballad (Perfect Day) and even an old-time jazz parody (Goodnight Ladies) which is sung with a tongue a heavy as lead. Why then compare this highly original music mix with others, when it's so much easier to hear this record for what it is - a truly cult album?



    Musicians:



    • Lou Reed (vocal, guitar, arranger)

    • Mick Ronson (vocal, guitar, piano, arranger)

    • David Bowie (vocal, arranger)

    • Ronnie Ross (saxophone)

    • Klaus Voorman (bass)

    • Herbie Flowers (tuba, bass)

    • John Halzey, Barry Desouza; Ritchie Dharma (drums)




    Recording: 1972 by Arun Chakranerty

    Production: David Bowie and Mick Ronson





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Vicious
    2. Andy's Chest
    3. Perfect Day
    4. Hangin' Round
    5. Walk on the Wild Side
    6. Make Up
    7. Satellite of Love
    8. Wagon Wheel
    9. New York Telephone Conversation
    10. I'm So Free
    11. Goodnight Ladies

    Lou Reed
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • In A New Setting (Speakers Corner) In A New Setting (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    In A New Setting (Speakers Corner)

    The vibraphonist presents himself in a new setting in this recording from 1964. Clearly Milt Jackson wanted to free himself occasionally from the straightjacket of the Modern Jazz Quartet. Sonny's Blues is proof of this: it is percussive and swinging, and without the eagle eyes of John Lewis in the background. This time the young McCoy Tyner, who had worked with John Coltrane (A Love Supreme was recorded in the same month), was at the piano. Jimmy Heath, responsible for the drive not only as a composer but also as instrumentalist, and Bob Cranshaw on the bass, contribute important impetus to the short blues, ballad-like and bop themes. None of the twelve numbers became a real jazz hit, but each has kept its own individual charm to this day.
    If you set value on an excellent product being excellently packaged then you are well advised to purchase this LP. Unlike the CD version in its jewel case, this album is now being re-released with its original gatefold cover from the truly beautiful Limelight series, for which the designer alone should have received a Grammy.



    Musicians:



    • Jimmy Heath (tenor saxophone)

    • Milt Jackson (vibraphone (vibes))

    • McCoy Tyner (piano)

    • Bob Cranshaw (bass)

    • Connie Kay (drums)



    Recording: December 1964

    Production: Luchi De Jesus



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Sonny's Blues
    2. I'm Gonna Laugh You Out Of My Life
    3. Spanish Fly
    4. No Moon At All
    5. Slow Death
    6. Clay's Blues
    7. Lazy Melody
    8. Project-S
    9. Ev-ry Time We Say Goodbye
    10. That's In
    11. Ineffable
    Milt Jackson
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bizet: Carmen (Speakers Corner) Bizet: Carmen (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $95.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bizet: Carmen (Speakers Corner)

    This is a problem recording, and even fans of Leonard Bernstein and Marilyn Horne will find it odd« writes a large mail-order media company about this Carmen production. However, discerning listeners who submerge themselves in the music will soon conclude that the problem is rather to be found among the many highly acclaimed and styled-up other recordings that present the fiery musical portrait as a sanitized, spirited indoor ballet. This is very different from Bernstein, who hints at the work's inevitable tragedy already in the agonisingly weighty clashing cymbals of the surprisingly slow opening. His rustic-sounding street scenes are filled with vaudeville, raw and authentic, and so typical of how people behave when they dance out-of-doors. This Carmen is far closer to the cracking Westside Story than a saturated Traviata.


    Marilyn Horne in the title role lends the full-blooded Carmen such an incredible voice in all manner of moods that one can hardly believe that we are listening to just one singer. One minute we hear the bright voice of a young girl lusting for life, and in the next minute the mezzo-like pained cry of a man-killing heroine.
    James McCracken has a distinctive dry voice, which is full of rousing passion, and is ideal in the role of Don JosÉ. He is complemented by the dramatic, powerful baritone Tom Krause as the torero Escamillo.


    Harry Pearson, the founder and former Editor in Chief of the specialist magazine The Absolute Sound, accorded this outstanding recording a regular mention in his 'super disc' list - no problem!

    Musicians:



    • Marylin Horne

    • James McCracken

    • The Manhattan Opera Chorus and the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra conducted by Leonard Bernstein



    Recording: September and October 1972 im Manhattan Center, New York von
    GÜnter Hermanns

    Production: Thomas W. Mowrey



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    LP 1
    1. Prelude
    First Act
    2. Introduction
    3. March And Chorus Of Urchins
    4. Chorus And Scene
    5. Habanera
    6. Scene
    7. Dialogue
    8. Duet
    9. Chorus

    10. Chanson And Melodrama

    11. Chanson Et Duet
    12. Finale


    LP 2
    1. Entracte
    Second Act
    2. Chanson
    3. Chorus And Ensemble
    4. Couplets / Chorus
    5. Quintet
    6. Chanson
    7. Duo
    8. Finale
    Third Act
    9. Entracte

    10. Introduction


    LP 3
    1. Trio
    2. Ensemble
    3. Air
    4. Duo
    5. Finale

    6. Entracte

    Fourth Act
    7. Chorus

    8. Chorus

    9. Final Duo

    Georges Bizet
    $95.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Box Set - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Stravinsky - Firebird (Speakers Corner) Stravinsky - Firebird (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Stravinsky - Firebird (Speakers Corner)

    Ernest Ansermet's long friendship with Igor Stravinsky enabled him to witness the birth of some of the composer's most important creations. This proved to be of incalculable worth in his interpretation of the works he premiered for Stravinsksy.



    Here Ansermet directs the OSR in a performance of Stravinsky's The Firebird. It is the composer's first major ballet, brought him world fame and continues to gain in popularity to this day. The story - which combines the motifs of several Russian fairy tales with a magic Firebird, a vanishing castle, an evil magician, and a hero who saves the maiden - inspired Stravinsky to write some of his most fascinating and mysterious music.



    The OSR is fully equal to its fine reputation. Ernest Ansermet's competence as an interpreter is evident throughout.



    Acoustically, this pressing offers advantages over the original. Here the orchestra resonates with a full, natural and mellow sound that blossoms into a veritable garden of tonality extending around and behind the loudspeakers.
    This new edition of Stravinsky's The Firebird is a true stereophonic delight.





    Musicians:



    • Orchestre de la Suisse Romande

    • Ernest Ansermet (conductor)




    Recording date and venue: May 1955 at Victoria Hall, Geneva by Roy Wallace
    Production: James Walker




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Ernest Ansermet
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Stravinsky - Firebird (Speakers Corner) Stravinsky - Firebird (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Stravinsky - Firebird (Speakers Corner)

    The Firebird can almost be described as a work of fate, since it is not only the first of several ballets that Stravinsky wrote for Sergei Diaghilev and his Ballets Russes but also marks his international breakthrough as a composer. In comparison with his other earlier stage works, the ecstatic, sharply contoured Rite of Spring for example, The Firebird, with its melodic character, is a far gentler work altogether.


    There are unmistakable reminiscences of the musical language of Rimsky-Korsakov and Tchaikovsky as well as snatches of late-Romantic harmonies; all this lends the music the charm of Russian tradition.
    In his performance, Dorati chooses the golden mean in that he has his ensemble produce a highly colourful but by no means glaring sound. Thus the listener is given the opportunity to follow the development of the finely chiselled motifs which are so characteristic of this early composition. Happily, the chamber-music-like transparency is preserved even in the loud, more exposed passages - the sound leaves the loudspeakers with a sprightly, athletic tread, as it were.


    Musicians:



    • Antal Dorati (conductor)

    • Igor Stravinsky (composer)

    • The London Symphony Orchestra



    Recording: June 1959 at Watford Town Hall, London, by C. R. Fine and Robert Eberenz
    Production: Wilma Cozart-Fine and Harold Lawrence




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Stravinsky
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bela Bartok: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 2 (Speakers Corner) Bela Bartok: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 2 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bela Bartok: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 2 (Speakers Corner)

    Bartók's Second Violin Concerto combines a potent mixture of traditional concerto writing, compositional history and biographical upheavals. It was one of the last works he wrote before emigrating to the USA, and its classical three-movement form unites a mature feeling for form, sparkling musicality and exceptional violinistic sophistication.


    Bartók employs the inexhaustible sources of tonal writing with superb mastery to produce his own distinctive tonal language. In his dissonantly sharpened, expressive, even audacious music one can recognise peasant dance, cantilena, variation movement, rondo form, and twelve-tone themes, which however remain tonal.


    During his career spanning 60 years Isaac Stern recorded this major contemporary work several times and demonstrates once again his superb mastery of his instrument in this particular recording. With bravura he conjures up eruptive snatches of melody out of the rhapsodic depths, allows the slow movement to glow with pastoral sentiment, and tears through the vast variations finale with a perfect command of the score, his instrument and his creative prowess.


    Musicians:



    • Isaac Stern and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra

    • BÉla Bartók (composer)

    • Leonard Bernstein (conductor)




    Recording: January 1958 at Columbia 30th Street Studio, New York, by Jack Ashkinzy

    Production: Howard H. Scott



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Allegro Non Troppo
    2. Andante Tranquillo
    3. Allegro Molto
    Leonard Bernstein & Isaac Stern
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Beck, Bogert & Appice (Speakers Corner) Beck, Bogert & Appice (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Beck, Bogert & Appice (Speakers Corner)

    On the whole, the supergroups of the Seventies didn't last very long, but for that - all the more notably. This certainly applies to the Anglo-American trio made up of the extremely talented though narcissistic guitarist Jeff Beck, the bass-player Tim Bogert, and the drummer Carmine Appice. As early as 1970, the British Beck wanted to engage the two American musicians for a joint project. This plan however had to be postponed for two years because the speed-mad Beck had had a serious car accident and needed time to recover. 1973 saw the release of the trio's first and only studio album, which not only demonstrated Beck's powerful-hectic style of guitar playing but also allowed his musical companions to show off their prowess. The trio applied their musical talents to all facets of rock 'n' roll, right from the bluesy first number (Black Cat Moan), via the agile rock sound of Lady, ending up with the moans of a vocal love ballad (Oh To Love You), followed by a really convincing gospel song (Sweet And Surrender) and the super funky beat of Lose Myself With You.
    The trio seemed to lust for more - but this was not to be. For the very next year, during the intense preparations for their next studio album, the moody Jeff Beck dissolved the group on the spur of the moment.



    Musicians:



    • Jeff Beck (guitar, vocal)

    • Jimmy Greenspoon (piano)

    • Duane Hitchings (keyboards,melophone, piano)

    • Tim Bogert (bass)

    • Carmine Appice (drums, vocal)

    • Danny Hutton (background vocal)




    Recording: 1973 by Baker Bigsby and Gray Starr

    Production: Don Nix and The Boys




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Black Cat Moan
    2. Lady
    3. Oh To Love You
    4. Superstition
    5. Sweet Surrender
    6. Why Should I Care
    7. Lose Myself With You
    8. Livin' Alone
    9. I'm So Alone
    Jeff Beck, Tim Bogert & Carmine Apprice
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Paradise & Lunch (Speakers Corner) Paradise & Lunch (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Paradise & Lunch (Speakers Corner)

    A good 20 years have passed since a band with ancient musicians from Cuba - the Buena Vista Social Club - took the world by storm. Behind the project, in the wings yet right in the midst of this unheard-of music, was Ry Cooder, who regarded this encounter as the greatest musical event of his entire life. The bottleneck guitar hero had always been very interested in the music from the other Americas ever since the solo albums he made in his early years, in which he told the story of the American folk and blues in a multitude of styles. The LP Paradise And Lunch is no exception and begins with gospel-like grooves that smell of native soil. The faint smell of a wooden church from pioneering days wafts out of the processional antiphonal song Jesus On The Mainline and a healthy 12-bar blues paints a picture of what silent witnesses could tell if they could (If Walls Could Talk). Cooder and his sidemen felt themselves perfectly at home when adventuring further afield and this is testified to in the laid-back calypso rhythm of It's All Over Now and the clip-clop of Mexican Divorce.


    This wonderful album is highly recommended for each and every number, but if you want a tip for a very special track, then just listen to the ragtime piano rolls in Bo Diddley's Ditty Wah Ditty.


    Musicians:



    • Ry Cooder (guitar, mandolin, bass, vocal)

    • Ronnie Barron (piano, organ)

    • Earl Hines (piano)

    • Plas Johnson (alto saxophone)

    • Oscar Brashear (cornet)

    • Red Callender (bass)

    • John Duke (bass)

    • Russ Titelman (electric bass)

    • Chris Ethridge (electric bass)

    • Milt Holland (drums, percussion)

    • Jim Keltner (drums)




    Recording: 1974 at the Warner Brothers Studios in North Hollywood and Burbank (USA), by Lee Herschberg

    Production: Lenny Waronker & Russ Titelman




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Tamp 'Em Up Solid
    2. Tattler
    3. Married Man's a Fool
    4. Jesus on the Mainline
    5. It's All Over Now
    6. Fool for a Cigarette/Feelin' Good
    7. If Walls Could Talk
    8. Mexican Divorce
    9. Ditty Wah Ditty
    Ry Cooder
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Flood (Speakers Corner) Flood (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $64.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Flood (Speakers Corner)

    In the summer of 1975, the Herbie Hancock Sextet made a hugely successful tour of Japan, which made people aware of a 'new' Hancock. The last LP that the keyboard virtuoso had recorded, Thrust, was already one year old, and the film music for the Charles Bronson classic Death Wish was received negatively by his fans. At his concerts in Tokyo, Herbie Hancock reached back to his hits: Maiden Voyage, Chameleon, and the famous, soulful Watermelon Man made the fans at his concert hall and open-air appearances go wild with enthusiasm. Forty years later I have the courage to confess that I couldn't have cared less about this music at the time; in Europe there was enough that was new and exciting to see and listen to. However, this re-release in its original format has given me the opportunity to check out whether this music has withstood the test of time. And I must say: it has passed the test! Just listen to Herbie at his best!
    Dr. Michael Frohne



    Musicians:



    • Herbie Hancock (keyboard)

    • Bennie Maupin (saxophone, clarinet, flute, percussion)

    • Blackbird McKnight (guitar)

    • Paul Jackson (bass)

    • Mike Clark (drums)

    • Bill Summers (conga, percussion)




    Recording: June and July 1975 at Shibuja Kohkaido and Nakano Sun Plaza, Tokyo, by Tomoo Suzuki
    Production: David Rubinson




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Herbie Hancock
    $64.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Quatuor Pour La Fin Du Temps (Speakers Corner) (On Sale) Quatuor Pour La Fin Du Temps (Speakers Corner) (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $34.99 $19.99 Save $15.00 (43%)

    Buy Now
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    Quatuor Pour La Fin Du Temps (Speakers Corner) (On Sale)

    The title alone Quartet for the end of time and the fact that it was composed in 1940, when war was raging, give one an inkling of the ominous background to the writing of this piece of music. Messiaen had been captured by the German army during the occupation of France and sent to a prisoner-of-war camp near Görlitz, where he was held for a long, hard year. He was permitted to have manuscript paper, and was able to compose the quartet. On 15 January he and three fellow prisoners were given the opportunity to perform the piece before an audience of about 400 prisoners.



    Messiaen's Quartet is not written in the classical four-movement form but as an eight-movement suite. Each section is a musical expression of programmatic meditation on the Creation and the Gospel according to St. John. The melodic writing is such that the listener is given a feeling of timelessness and endless space. Here, specific rhythms, which in contrast to 'classical' music have no set musical pulse, enhance the feeling that time is expanded and takes on a spiritual dimension. Messiaen thus creates a thoroughly new concept, which is in direct opposition to traditional compositional ideas of precise and regular metrics and structures, development and the genesis of forward-moving music.
    There is certainly no more convincing performance of this exceptional composition, which was recorded in the presence of the composer and authorised by him.




    Musicians:



    • Luben Yordanoff (violin)

    • Albert Tetard (cello)

    • Claude Desurmont (clarinet)

    • Daniel Barenboim (piano, conductor)




    Recording: April 1978 in Masion de la MutualitÉ, Paris, by Klaus Scheibe

    Production: GÜnther Breest



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Liturgie de cristal
    2. Vocalise, pour l'Ange qui annonce la fin du temps
    3. Abîme des oiseaux
    4. Intermède
    5. Louange à l'EternitÉ de JÉsus
    6. Danse de la fureur, pour les sept trompettes
    7. Fouillis d'arcs-en-ciel, pour l'Ange qui annonce la fin du temps
    8. Louange à l'ImmortalitÉ de JÉsus
    Olivier Messiaen
    $34.99 $19.99 Save $15.00 (43%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Gil Evans Orchestra Plays The Music Of Jimi Hendrix (Speakers Corner) The Gil Evans Orchestra Plays The Music Of Jimi Hendrix (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
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    The Gil Evans Orchestra Plays The Music Of Jimi Hendrix (Speakers Corner)

    Critics find this album rather difficult to evaluate. Their judgement ranges from a colourful mixture to a successful cover album to a masterly fusion and an homage to an artist whose life came to an end far too soon - Jimi Hendrix. Jimi had long been gone when this album was recorded in 1974. But it is almost superfluous to look back to the legendary Hendrix if you focus on the great Gil Evans. After such milestones as Birth Of The Cool and Sketches Of Spain it isn't difficult to regard these late audiophile masterpieces as a logical development of Evans's exceptional skill as an arranger.
    When you listen - or rather experience - how the crystal-clear sound in Angel is heightened to an emphatic ballad on the saxophone, or how rich soulful vocals storm ahead in a funky style (Crosstown Traffic), or fluffy, cloud-like sounds are built up on the flutes in Castles Made From Sand, then it is no longer of importance who thought out the music. It is sufficient that it exists and is pleasing to all who hear it. It is also unimportant whether one reveres Hendrix's immemorable melodies or whether one pays homage to Evans's visionary soundworld: a recording such as this could only be born of the two.




    Musicians:



    • Gil Evans (arranger, conductor, piano)

    • David Sanborn, Billy Harper (saxophone, flute)

    • Billy Harper (saxophone, flute)

    • Lewis Soloff (trumpet)

    • Tom Malone (synthesizer, trombone, flute, bass)

    • David Horowitz (electric piano, synthesizer)

    • John Abercrombie (guitar)

    • Don Pate (bass)

    • Warren Smith, Jr. (chimes, percussion, vibraphone)

    • Bruce Ditmas (drums)



    Recording: 1974 at RCA's Studio B, New York City, by Bob Simpson
    Production: Mike Lipskin




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Angel
    2. Crosstown Traffic/ Little Miss Lover
    3. Castles Made of Sand/Foxey Lady
    4. Up From the Skies
    5. 1983 - A Merman I Should Turn to Be
    6. Voodoo Child (Slight Return)
    7. Gypsy Eyes
    8. Angel
    9. Castles Made of Sand
    10. Up From the Skies
    11. Gypsy Eyes
    Gil Evans Orchestra
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Chet is Back (Speakers Corner) Chet is Back (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
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    Chet is Back (Speakers Corner)

    Forty-two years ago, Chet Baker - one of the most tragic figures of jazz who lived on the fast lane and ruined himself with drugs and alcohol - was constantly on the road from one European jazz club to another. Local rhythm groups were not always top notch so it was only logical to pick the very best from several countries for a film-music production in Italy. And it was equally logical that RCA's Italian subsidiary brought the musicians into the studio in January 1962.



    With one exception, the eight titles on this disc are all so-called standards. The two winds demand total concentration from the rhythm section while maintaining relaxed and laid-back harmonic patterns. And this is something the Italian Tommasi, the Belgian Thomas, the Frenchman Quersin and the Swiss Humair carry off with an air of nonchalance. The two ballads These Foolish Things and the only new composition Ballata In Forma Di Blues are tucked in between the other numbers and give the listener space to breathe. They are surrounded by numbers with a fast tempo, all of which demonstrate Chet Baker's and Bobby Jaspar's high standard of musicianship. And then there is Over The Rainbow, whose theme is coupled with another tragic figure of music history, Judy Garland: Chet on his trumpet conjures up pure magic in the middle section.



    Happily, these recordings - made in Rome in 1962 - are not purely restricted to collectors living in the Sixties. This re-release on LP now offers the opportunity to listen to some excellent music and to enjoy the cover - just as it was on the original recording: a priceless gem!




    Musicians:



    • Chet Baker (trumpet)

    • Bobby Jaspar (tenor saxophone, flute)

    • Amadeo Tommasi (piano)

    • RenÉ Thomas (guitar)

    • Benoit Quersin (bass)

    • Daniel Humair (drums)




    Recording: January 1962 in Rome, Italy




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Well, You Neednt
    2. These Foolish Things
    3. Barbados
    4. Star Eyes
    5. Over The Rainbow
    6. Pent Up House
    7. Ballata In Forma Di Blues
    8. Blues In The Closet
    Chet Baker
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Volunteers (Speaker Corner) Volunteers (Speaker Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Volunteers (Speaker Corner)

    Ranked 370/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

    Jefferson Airplane, wrote the magazine Rolling Stone, is a ship which transports its passengers to the revolutionary fantasies of their own minds. If only the group had included such well-formulated psychological analyses in their lyrics, then they would probably not have shot so meteorically into the orbit of the psychedelic 'acid rock' scene. And what is more: as self-appointed executors of chaos and anarchy, they 'turned on' their fans with musical sexual allegories, drug-extolling lyrics and revolutionary songs. In 1966, armed with a lucrative recording contract from RCA-Victor, they won through against much opposition from recording company bosses and released their album Volunteers, thereby bringing what is probably the very best recording from their early years to the public.



    The music of these rock rebels is, in fact, a good deal less drastic than their texts. The leaders of the combo, Marty Balin and Paul Kantner, both of whom grew up in the Californian folk scene, have put their stake on melodic and rhythmically close-knit rock and multi-part vocals. And even today, one is still astounded by the wide range of styles favoured by the hippie generation, which stretches from the down-to-earth country music of The Farm to the electronically distorted collage Meadowlands.



    Musicians:



    • Grace Slick (vocal, organ)

    • Marty Balin (vocal)

    • Paul Kantner (vocal)

    • Jerry Garcia (guitar)

    • Jorma Kaukonen (guitar)

    • Steven Stills (organ)

    • Nicky Hopkins (piano)

    • Jack Casady (bass)

    • Spencer Dryden (drums)

    • Joey Covington (conga)




    Recording: 1969 by Richie Schmitt and Joe Lopes

    Production: Wally Heider and Al Schmitt



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. We Can Be Together
    2. Good Shepherd
    3. The Farm
    4. Hey Frederick
    5. Turn My Life Down
    6. Wooden Ships
    7. Eskimo Blue Day
    8. A Song For all Seasons
    9. Meadowlands
    10. Volunteers
    Jefferson Airplane
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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