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  • Muddy Waters Sings Big Bill (Speakers Corner) Muddy Waters Sings Big Bill (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Muddy Waters Sings Big Bill (Speakers Corner)

    In 1960, when Muddy Waters recorded this album as a tribute to Big Bill Broonzy two years after his death, he could be sure of Broonzy's approval. »Oh yeah, Muddy is a real singer of the Blues«, Big Bill, that Mississippi foundation stone, was heard to say early on in Muddy Waters' career, although the sound of the man 15 years his junior could be likened to new shoots coming out of the gnarled root named the Blues.



    Full of confidence after a "Best Of" compilation released on the Chess label in 1959 and his legendary appearance at the Newport Folk Festival, Muddy set down his own Broonzy songs. It goes almost without saying that such successful numbers as "I Feel So Good" and "Tell Me Baby" are overflowing with a 'Chicago feeling' which gets right under your skin. Pulsating with the metallic heartbeat of the electric guitar and the gyrating licks which James Cotton conjures out of his harmonica, the cover title amalgamates the individual styles of two top-notch Blues musicians to produce a highly emotional mixture. And let's not forget the band formed around keyboarder Otis Spann, their fellow musician of many years' standing. Just listen carefully to this small but excellent ensemble and you will certainly forget the banal term 'rhythm group'!





    Musicians:



    • Muddy Waters (vocal)

    • James Cotton (harmonica)

    • Pat Hare (guitar)

    • Otis Spann (piano)

    • Andrew Stephenson (bass)

    • Francey Clay, Willie Smith (drums)




    Recording: July and August 1959 in Chicago




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Tell Me Baby
    2. Southbound Train
    3. When I Get to Thinking
    4. Just a dream (On My Mind)
    5. Double Trouble
    6. I Feel So Good
    7. I Done Got Wise
    8. Mopper's Blues
    9. Lonesome Road Blues
    10. Hey, Hey
    Muddy Waters
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Blood, Sweat, & Tears: 3 (Speakers Corner) Blood, Sweat, & Tears: 3 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Blood, Sweat, & Tears: 3 (Speakers Corner)

    1970 was a really good year for Blood, Sweat & Tears. The colourful, distinguished group was awarded a Grammy® in the categories "Album of the Year", "Best Contemporary Instrumental Performance", and "Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s)".



    The concept of merging jazz, blues and arrangements of classical themes worked well, with music journalist Leonard Feather commenting that »it brought music into rock«.
    Everything seemed to be allowed - as long as it sounded good: almost spontaneously, it seems, the musicians develop a somewhat boozy, cheery Hi-De-Ho happening out of synthetically created chivalric fanfares, or conjure up a medieval scenario (The Battle) with the archaic sound of a harpsichord and solo voice. That caustic big-band soul (Lucrezia MacEvil) and seemingly familiar rock songs (Fire And Rain) find their niche here fits in with the free spirit of this third album, which boasts no otherwise specified title. One listens to this disc, wondering what surprise is in store in the next beat, the next phrase, the next number. And there is a wonderfully liberating feeling in knowing that nothing is a 'must' but all is allowed.



    Musicians:



    • David Clayton Thomas (vocal)

    • Fred Lipsius (alto saxophone, piano, vocal)

    • Lew Soloff (trumpet, fluegel horn)

    • Jerry Hyman (trombone)

    • Steve Katz (guitar, harmonica, vocal)

    • Dick Halligan (organ, piano, harmonica, trombone, flute, vocal)

    • Jim Fielder (bass)

    • Bobby Colomby (drums, percussion, vocal)




    Recording: 1970 by Roy Halee

    Production: Bobby Colomby and Roy Halee





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Hi-De-Ho
    2. The Battle
    3. Lucretia MacEvil
    4. Lucretia's Reprise
    5. Fire and Rain
    6. Lonesome Suzie
    7. Symphony For the Devil
    8. He's a Runner
    9. Somethin' Comin' On
    10. Forty Thousand Headmen
    Blood, Sweat And Tears
    $34.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner) The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $95.99
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    x

    The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner)

    The attempts that have been made to describe Glenn Gould's complex personality are endless in number, as are his surprising and often eccentric interpretations. Whether he is considered to be a sensitive maniac, neurotic individualist or uncompromising genius - Gould polarises, provokes and fascinates us long after his death in 1982. As early as 1964 the Canadian pianist ceased to give concerts, since he found appearing before an audience completely unacceptable and preferred to concentrate on studio recordings.



    Way in front of composers of the Viennese Classical era, which he did not take particularly seriously - although his performances keenly reflect Beethoven's rhythmicity - comes his personal deity: Bach. Gould's notorious strictness gives form to the minutest of figure in the score. He weaves his way through Bach's music and thereby articulates its tightly knit and multi-facetted depths. No lecturing keyboard proponent this, but a creative co-composer who imbues the spirit of the music with life and sonority. Upon the release in 1980 of the 80th Birthday Edition with its wealth of visual and tonal material, the music journalist Werner Theurich wrote that »no one had ever played more raptly, or more intensively. That Gould's performances are nothing but heavenly can be seen and felt. The rest is pure music.«




    Recording: April 1957, May 1967 and February 1969 at Columbia 30th Street Studio, New York City, by Fred Plaut

    Production: Andrew Kazdin




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    The Bach Keyboard Concertos J. S. Bach: Keyboard Concertos Nos. 1-5 and 7
    L. v. Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 1 - Glenn Gould, the Columbia Symphony Orchestra conducted by Vladimir Golschmann and Leonard Bernstein
    Glenn Gould
    $95.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Box Set - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Plays Bach No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Plays Bach No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Plays Bach No. 1 (Speakers Corner)

    As long as 40 years ago, at a time when Pop and Classical music were strictly separated from one another, Jacques Loussier's "Swinging Bach" thrilled both friends of Baroque music and jazz lovers alike. Other musicians have tried, and are still trying, to jump on this modern "Bach band wagon" - but not one of them has achieved anything like the international success of the French trio.



    "Play Bach" is to be taken at its word. If Prelude, Fugue or Toccata is on the label - then that's what one gets: the melodies and the harmonic structure of Johann Sebastian's original works are largely left untouched - you always know where counterpoint stops and groove sets in. Just as in Bach's day the keyboard is at the fore, but the double bass also has a good share of the polyphony, and the finely nuanced percussion swings along as though it has no cares in the world and adds its own sparks of fire to pearl-like scale passages.
    What better way to bring the Bach Year to an end than with the re-release of the first Loussier album? The first of Bach's 48 Preludes and Fugues shows how it began - just as they show how Jacques Loussier began.



    Musicians:



    • Jacques Loussier (arranger, piano)

    • Pierre Michelot (bass)

    • Christian Garros (drums, percussion)




    Recording: 1959




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Jacques Loussier
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $69.99
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    At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress)

    Many critics regard Dave Brubeck's Carnegie Hall concert from February 1963 as his greatest ever live appearance. But who can really determine that? For no one - apart from Brubeck himself - would have seen and heard his conservatively estimated 12,000 concerts.



    Although the twelve titles had already been released on LPs that had been recorded in the studio, these records were certainly not known to all those in the audience. In between the numbers on each LP, Brubeck made little 'advertising spots' in short comments, but with such charm and wit that one really cannot be angry with him.



    The concert programme begins with St. Louis Blues and ends with Take Five. Luckily, the solos are distributed among all the musicians, so that Paul Desmond and Joe Morello - whose prowess on this evening can only be called 'amazingly good' - justifiably received enthusiastic applause from both the audience and us alike. Castilian Drums demonstrates Morello's wealth of ideas and his grandiose feeling for rhythm; though short, Paul Desmond's solos (Southern Scene is a good example!) are compelling, highly melodic, lyrical and possess a unique tone - as such they are immediately recognisable.



    How fortunate that the twelve brilliantly improvised numbers are now available once again on vinyl, having been recorded live at the legendary Carnegie Hall 60 years ago.



    Musicians:



    • Dave Brubeck (piano)

    • Paul Desmond (alto saxophone)

    • Eugene Wright (bass)

    • Joe Morello (drums)


    Recording: February 1963 Carnegie Hall, New York

    Production: Teo Macero



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    St. Louis Blues
    Bossa Nova U.S.A.
    For All We Know
    Pennies From Heaven
    Southern Scene
    Three To Get Ready
    Eleven Four
    King For A Day
    Castillian Drums
    It's A Raggy Waltz
    Blue Rondo A La Turk
    Take Five
    Dave Brubeck
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Big Band And Quartet In Concert (Speakers Corner) Big Band And Quartet In Concert (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Big Band And Quartet In Concert (Speakers Corner)

    Thelonious Monk could walk from his flat to New York's famous Philharmonic Hall on the corner of 64th Street and Broadway when he made his very first appearance there with his Big Band in December 1963. And the other musicians could get there on the underground: Phil Woods, Steve Lacy, Thad Jones - all of them were members of Monk's closest circle of collaborators. It is no wonder then that the well-known themes were highly agreeable and harmonious. I Mean You, Four In One and Epistrophy resounded through the auditorium, the audience was thrilled, Thelonious laughed and danced and a short while later fans could listen to parts of the concert on a recording released by Columbia Records. In a break for a smoke, Monk sat himself down at the piano and played Darkness On The Delta - nocturnal atmosphere pure.


    Does it bear the patina of times long past? Absolutely not! Thelonious Monk is as red-hot as he ever was.



    Musicians:



    • Thelonious Monk (piano)

    • Charlie Rouse (tenor saxophone)

    • Steve Lacy (soprano saxophone)

    • Phil Woods (alto saxophone, clarinet)

    • Gene Allen (bassoon, clarinet)

    • Eddie Bert (trombone)

    • Thad Jones (cornet)

    • Nick Travis (trumpet)

    • Butch Warren (bass)

    • Frank Dunlop (drums)


    Recording: December 1963 at Lincoln Center, Philharmonic Hall, New York

    Production: Teo Macero



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. I Mean You
    2. Evidence
    3. (When It's) Darkness On The Delta
    4. Oska T.
    5. Played Twice
    6. Four In One
    7. Epistrophy
    Thelonious Monk
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • For LP Fans Only (Speakers Corner) For LP Fans Only (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    For LP Fans Only (Speakers Corner)

    Along with the album A Date With Elvis (RCA LPM-2011), For LP Fans Only is one of the most important special productions of the young King of Rock'n'Roll. Because Elvis had been conscripted into the US army, no new recordings could take place, and so record producers delved deep into the sound archives and dug out a few singles from his Sun Records days, mixed them with a couple of early RCA songs and a number from the Love Me Tender soundtrack, and, hey presto! a new Elvis LP was born. The overwhelming success of this album is not solely confined to the stylistic homogeneity of this collection of fresh, youthful songs. Far more, it's because for many fans the record offered the only substitution for the highly coveted but rare original singles That's All Right, Mystery Train and My Baby Left Me.



    Not without reason has today's 'bits-and-bytes' generation ignored the words on the cover and produced several re-releases. Which just goes to emphasise the widespread opinion that this is one of Elvis's very best albums and at the same time one of the most important in the whole of rock'n'roll - especially in the present vinyl pressing.





    Musicians:



    • Elvis Presley (guitar, vocal)

    • Various Bands







    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. That's All Right

    2. Lawdy, Miss Clawdy

    3. Mystery Train

    4. Playing For Keeps

    5. Poor Boy

    6. My Baby Left Me

    7. I Was The One

    8. Shake, Rattle And Roll

    9. I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone

    10. You're A Heartbreaker
    Elvis Presley
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Aretha Live At Fillmore West (Speakers Corner) Aretha Live At Fillmore West (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Aretha Live At Fillmore West (Speakers Corner)

    Live recordings come up with extremely different results: most of them land in the rubbish bin, some of them are available as bootleg copies when a star's career has ended and are passed on conspiratorially from one excited collector to another. Only a very few conserve real spirit and sheer enthusiasm, which no arranger or sound mixer can conjure up in the studio.


    But even more sensational was Aretha Franklin's guest appearance at the Fillmore West, the legendary concert hall in San Francisco, which closed down shortly afterwards. Everyone knew who was going to perform, and yet everything was quite different on these three nights in the spring of 1971: her usual show band was left behind in Detroit and she appeared with King Curtis And The Kingpins - one of the most impressive bands around - accompanied by the trailblazers Cornel Dupree (g) and Bernard Purdie (dr). The Memphis Horns, a fantastic horn section, blast away in the background, their keen as a razor backings rising up to soaring heights. From Billy Preston's fingertips on the organ flows an aura of spiritual energy and Ray Charles, who by chance (but how fortuitous!) was among the audience also got his appearance in the telling title Spirit In The Dark. No words need be lost about the queen on the cover. For without the superb albums of the late Sixties, Aretha Franklin would never have become the USA's first sister of soul nor would she have appeared in the Fillmore West.


    Musicians:

    Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles (vocals, electric piano)

    King Curtis (tenor saxophone, soprano saxophone)

    Billy Preston (organ)

    Truman Thomas (Electric Piano)

    Cornell Dupree (guitar)

    Jerry Jemmot (bass)

    Bernard Purdie (drums)

    Pancho Morales (conga)



    Recording: February 1975 live at Fillmore West, San Francisco, by Ray Thompson

    Production: Jerry Wexler and Arif Mardin

    About Speakers Corner


    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.


    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.


    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.


    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.


    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.


    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Respect
    2. Love The One You're With
    3. Bridge Over Troubled Water
    4. Eleanor Rigby
    5. Make It With You
    6. Don't Play That Song
    7. Dr. Feelgood
    8. Spirit In The Dark
    9. Reach Out And Touch (Somebody's Hand)
    Aretha Franklin
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Graduate (Speakers Corner) The Graduate (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Graduate (Speakers Corner)

    With his film The Graduate, which was crowned with an Oscar and five Golden Globes, director Mike Nichols created far more than just the story of the erotic initiation of the college graduate Benjamin. Not only the scenario but also the production modalities were revolutionary. For the very first time the crusted morals of the American upper class were attacked by means of film, an Alfa Romeo - a European car - was advertised most effectively, and a soundtrack was put together from already existent, successful pop numbers. No words are really necessary about the music, since numbers such as Sound Of Silence, Mrs. Robinson and Scarborough Fair have entered into the annals of musical culture ever since they were used in the film. It is astounding to note how seamlessly the various works fit snugly into the film's context, as though they had been specially written for the scenes.



    This soundtrack is a monument to Dustin Hoffman, who played his first big role in the film, and it catapulted Simon & Garfunkel right to the top of the list of ballad singers. But it also recalls to memory the peppy, instrumental insertion numbers by Dave Grusin, who virtually fell into oblivion after all the hype about this provocative movie.



    Musicians:



    • Paul Simon (guitar, vocal)

    • Art Garfunkel (vocal)

    • Dave Grusin




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1.The Sound Of Silence - Simon And Garfunkel
    2. The Singleman Party Foxtrot - David Grusin
    3. Mrs. Robinson - Simon And Garfunkel
    4. Sunporch Cha-Cha-Cha - David Grusin
    5. Scarborough Fair / Canticle (Inerlude) - Simon And Garfunkel
    6. On The Strip - David Grusin
    7. April Come She Will - Simon And Garfunkel
    8. The Folks - David Grusin
    9. Scarborough Fair / Canticle - Simon And Garfunkel
    10. A Great Effect - David Grusin
    11. The Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine - Simon And Garfunkel
    12. Whew - David Grusin
    13. Mrs. Robinson - Simon And Garfunkel
    14. The Sound Of Silence - Simon And Garfunkel
    Simon & Garfunkel
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Horses (Speakers Corner) Horses (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Horses (Speakers Corner)

    Ranked 44/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.


    Patti Smith, the first published poet to move her poetry completely into rock 'n' roll and to entice experimental rock fans into the forbidden cinema of her hallucinatory fantasy (New York Times), began her musical career unconventionally. It took off at a poetry reading where she was backed by Lenny Kaye on guitar; later star photographer Robert Mapplethorpe financed her punk-rock cult single Hey Joe. In 1975, encouraged by her success, Patti Smith released Horses, an album in which she fused rock riffs and spoken rhythms to create a punk-trash sound. The rock scene was electrified, raging about the best garage sound of the 70s (Creem Magazine) and conjectured that Smith had drawn up material from Rimbaud, Burroughs, Dylan and Velvet Underground into a hot needle and injected it under the skin (Sounds Magazine). Later productions were dismissed as sentimental and self-loving outpourings, since the rock-poet didn't continue in the same vein as Horses, with its metallic harshness and raw language. That's why this recording remains an impressive unique production by a visionary rock 'n' roll singer.



    Musicians:



    • Patti Smith (guitar, vocals)

    • Richard Sohl (piano)

    • Lenny Kaye (bass, guitar, vocal)

    • Tom Verlaine, Allen Lanier (guitar)

    • Ivan Kral (bass, guitar, keyboards, vocals)

    • Jay Dee Daugherty (drums)




    Recording: January 1975 at Electric Ladyland Studios, New York City, by Bernie Kirsh

    Production: John Cale




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Gloria
    2. Redondo Beach
    3. Birdland
    4. Free Money
    5. Kimberly
    6. Break it Up
    7. Land
    8. Elegie
    Patti Smith
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Chet is Back (Speakers Corner) Chet is Back (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Chet is Back (Speakers Corner)

    Forty-two years ago, Chet Baker - one of the most tragic figures of jazz who lived on the fast lane and ruined himself with drugs and alcohol - was constantly on the road from one European jazz club to another. Local rhythm groups were not always top notch so it was only logical to pick the very best from several countries for a film-music production in Italy. And it was equally logical that RCA's Italian subsidiary brought the musicians into the studio in January 1962.



    With one exception, the eight titles on this disc are all so-called standards. The two winds demand total concentration from the rhythm section while maintaining relaxed and laid-back harmonic patterns. And this is something the Italian Tommasi, the Belgian Thomas, the Frenchman Quersin and the Swiss Humair carry off with an air of nonchalance. The two ballads These Foolish Things and the only new composition Ballata In Forma Di Blues are tucked in between the other numbers and give the listener space to breathe. They are surrounded by numbers with a fast tempo, all of which demonstrate Chet Baker's and Bobby Jaspar's high standard of musicianship. And then there is Over The Rainbow, whose theme is coupled with another tragic figure of music history, Judy Garland: Chet on his trumpet conjures up pure magic in the middle section.



    Happily, these recordings - made in Rome in 1962 - are not purely restricted to collectors living in the Sixties. This re-release on LP now offers the opportunity to listen to some excellent music and to enjoy the cover - just as it was on the original recording: a priceless gem!




    Musicians:



    • Chet Baker (trumpet)

    • Bobby Jaspar (tenor saxophone, flute)

    • Amadeo Tommasi (piano)

    • RenÉ Thomas (guitar)

    • Benoit Quersin (bass)

    • Daniel Humair (drums)




    Recording: January 1962 in Rome, Italy




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Well, You Neednt
    2. These Foolish Things
    3. Barbados
    4. Star Eyes
    5. Over The Rainbow
    6. Pent Up House
    7. Ballata In Forma Di Blues
    8. Blues In The Closet
    Chet Baker
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Sound Of Wilson Pickett (Speakers Corner) The Sound Of Wilson Pickett (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Sound Of Wilson Pickett (Speakers Corner)

    Wilson Pickett's best years were those when he recorded for Atlantic Records, and he remained convinced of this even after changing to other labels in his later career. Atlantic boss Jerry Wexler took the promising young Gospel singer under his wing and launched him on his rapidly developing career as an unruly soul man. Pickett's aggressiveness, which in his mature years occasionally resulted in him having backstage fights with musicians and managers, are expressed here in strong words and are given further bite by his antagonistic band. Although he lashed out to the full in his emotional, crackling vocal attacks, he never lost control and even his strongest outbursts remained highly musical. His unique, breathless sound and his ferocious efforts to express himself succinctly do not make for easy listening on this superb hit record and for white people, who according to Pickett would never understand soul music anyway, could well present a real challenge. Is this such fascinating music that you become dumbstruck? Very possibly, as critic Joachim von Mengershausen writes: »His voice is hard, aggressive and strained; it hardly binds the tones together, chops up the phrases, blurts out the essentials - Pickett has eliminated all the Uncle-Tom warmth in soul and has virtually rocked it away.«

    Musicians:



    • Wilson Pickett (vocal)

    • Spooner Oldham (piano, organ)

    • Andrew Love (tenor saxophone)

    • Floyd Newman (bassoon)

    • Gene Miller, Wayne Jackson (trumpet)

    • Jimmy R. Johnson, Chips Moman (guitar)

    • Junior Lowe (bass)

    • Roger Hawkins (drums)





    Recording: 1967 at Fame Recording Studios, Muscle Shoals (Alabama, USA), by Rick Hall & Tom Dowd

    Production: Jerry Wexler





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Soul Dance Number Three

    2. Funky Broadway
    3. I Need A Lot Of Loving Every Day
    4. I Found A Love, Part 1
    5. I Found A Love, Part 2
    6. You Can't Stand Alone
    7. Mojo Mamma
    8. I Found The One
    9. Something Within Me
    10. I'm Sorry About That
    11. Love Is A Beautiful Thing
    Wilson Pickett
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Wear Your Love Like Heaven (Speakers Corner) Wear Your Love Like Heaven (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Wear Your Love Like Heaven (Speakers Corner)

    Donovan Philip Leitch may well share a proletarian origin with several of the folk bards of his time. But comparisons with the top dog Dylan have worn thin and are not worth the effort since Donovan never was neither vocally nor thematically brusque - and moreover he created his own standards. He quickly converted the pacifist message of The Universal Soldier into positive thoughts and his poetry was concerned with history, sagas, myths and magic. »Lord, kiss me once more, fill me with song« he prays in Wear Your Love Like Heaven, and if this makes you sentimental then you are on the right wavelength. However, the »seller of hope« (Donovan on Donovan) triggers off a few psychedelic nerve tracts: whether it be a personal experience in echo form (Sun) or the sprechgesang and whistling of a vocal group (Little Boy In Corduroy) - light, gentle but perceptibly formed. That Donovan set far more than cheerful texts to the guitar is proven by the use of sawing stationary sound of the organ, low-register string passages and subtle rhythms, which raises his song repertoire miles above routine. A nice 'folksy guy' who merely loves the sun, moon and stars just cannot exist in times of war.


    This Speakers Corner production was manufactured 100% analogously, with the use of the analogue mastertape and analogue mastering. All royalties and mechanical rights have been paid.


    Musicians:



    • Donovan (vocals, guitar)

    • Mike O'Neil (organ,piano, harpsichord,)

    • Eric Leese (guitar)

    • Harold McNair (flute)

    • Mike Carr (vibraphone)

    • Jack Bruce, Cliff Barton (bass)

    • Keith Webb (drums)

    • Candy John Carr (conga, bongo)



    Recording: October 1967 at CBS Studios London by Michael Ross Trevor

    Production: Ashley Kozak




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    1. Wear Your Love Like Heaven
    2. Mad John's Escape
    3. Skip-A-Long Sam
    4. Sun
    5. There Was a Time
    6. Oh Gosh
    7. Little Boy in Corduroy
    8. Under the Greenwood Tree
    9. The Land of Doesn't Have to Be
    10. Someone Singing
    Donovan
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Orange Blossom Special (Speakers Corner) Orange Blossom Special (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Orange Blossom Special (Speakers Corner)

    Just like the often sung-about fellow locomotives 'Midnight Special' and the 'Chattenooga Choo Choo', the 'Orange Blossom Special' finds itself bathed in the very best tradition of American long-distance trains and memorable journeys. Puffing steam trains symbolise an atmosphere of departure, endurance and the mechanical pulse beat of profit-oriented industrialisation, while also conjuring up the spirit of down-and-outs who tramp from one end of the country to the other along the railtracks, dodging train fares.



    Almost guilelessly at first, the album number 20 forged ahead into the hearts and hips of Cash fans with old favourites and climbed to number three in the Country charts. If you listen carefully, you will notice that three top Bob Dylan songs have crept in - It Ain't Me Babe, Mama, You've Been On My Mind and Don't Think Twice, It's All Right. Dylan, who in his early years was far from enjoying cult status and was condemned a godless troublemaker, communist and traitor to folk music, found a perspicacious patron in Cash. In no uncertain terms, Cash demanded that Dylan's critics should »Shut up! ... and let him sing!« and even sang Dylan himself. This present LP is not merely a perfectly produced Country album by the Man In Black, but a traction engine for the work of his spiritual brother.



    Musicians:



    • Johnny Cash (vocals, guitar)

    • Charles R. Charlie McCoy (harpsichord)

    • Homer L. Boots Randolph (saxophone)

    • William K. Bill McElhiney (trumpet)

    • Luther Perkins (guitar)

    • Floyd Cramer (piano)

    • Marshall Grant (bass)

    • W.S. Holland (drums)




    Recording: 1964

    Production: Don Law, Frank Jones




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Orange Blossom Special
    2. The Long Black Veil
    3. It Ain't Me, Babe
    4. The Wall
    5. Don't Think Twice, It's All Right
    6. You Wild Colorado
    7. Mama, You Been On My Mind
    8. When It's Springtime In Alaska (It's Forty Below)
    9. All Of God's Children Ain't Free
    10. Danny Boy
    11. Wildwood Flower
    12. Amen
    Johnny Cash
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Miles Smiles (Speakers Corner) Miles Smiles (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Miles Smiles (Speakers Corner)

    Except for the taping of a live performance at the Portland Festival, Miles Davis's discography for 1966 only lists the recordings made for the LP Miles Smiles! How strange when one considers the usual large output of Miles and his ensembles for Columbia Records in the Sixties.



    The bass player Ron Carter was best suited for the complicated rhythm part and remained Miles's 'number one' in a quintet which gave a new interpretation to compositions by Wayne Shorter and jazz hits such as Freedom Jazz Dance by Eddie Harris and Jimmy Heath's Gingerbread Boy.



    Every second of the nine-minute-long Footprints by Shorter is an absolute highlight, while the drumming of the young Tony Williams in Freedom Jazz Dance is full of vitality, with a quick pulse, and even described as threatening in the liner notes. This music is neither 'new stream' nor 'old guard' but good modern jazz according to Anthony Tuttle. That's exactly what Miles Smiles was upon its release 40 years ago - and that's what it is to this day! And that Miles Davis smiled for once thanks to the great musical relationship between the five individualists is certainly no mere rumour.



    Musicians:



    • Miles Davis

    • Wayne Shorter (tenor saxophone)

    • Herbie Hancock (piano)

    • Ron Carter (bass)

    • Tony Williams (drums)




    Recording: October 1966 at Columbia RecordsStudios, New York, by Frank Laico

    Production: Teo Macero




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Orbits
    2. Circle
    3. Footprints
    4. Dolores
    5. Freedom Jazz Dance
    6. Ginger Bread Boy
    Miles Davis
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner) The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner)

    After the break-up of John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in the summer of 1967, the time seemed ripe for Peter Green, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood to take their leave from raw British rock 'n' roll. The newly established band Fleetwood Mac first turned to black blues, and their art of playing was so similar to that of other groups that the magazine Eye criticised them for their »almost ridiculous mimicry«. However, their choice of performance style took them in the right direction and in 1969, the year in which The Pious Bird Of Good Omen appeared, they landed at the top end of the pop charts, even ahead of The Beatles and Stevie Wonder.



    Of course, in the cover version of Little Willie John's Need Your Love So Bad, which is treated with a velvety string sound, and other bluesy songs, the American influence still makes itself heard, but not without success! The highly individual sound of the group comes best through in the now legendary numbers such as the weightless, gliding Albatross and Black Magic Woman with its Latin and blues elements. Judged the best British blues ever to be played (allmusic.com), one can now sit back and enjoy this great album.



    Musicians:



    • Peter Green (guitar, vocal)

    • Jeremy Spencer (guitar, piano, vocal)

    • Danny Kirwan (guitar)

    • Eddie Boyd (piano, vocal)

    • Big Walter Horton (harmonica)

    • John McVie (bass)

    • Mick Fleetwood (drums)




    Recorded between September 1967 and October 1968 by Mike Ross

    Production: Mike Vernon





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Need Your Love So Bad
    2. Comin' Home
    3. Rambling Pony
    4. The Big Boat
    5. I Believe My Time Ain't Long
    6. The Sun Is Shining
    7. Albatross
    8. Black Magic Woman
    9. Just The Blues
    10. Jigsaw Puzzle Blues
    11. Looking For Somebody
    12. Stop Messin' Round

    Fleetwood Mac
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Take Ten (Speakers Corner) Take Ten (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Take Ten (Speakers Corner)

    No, not Take Five but Take Ten is the title of this LP and its very first number. Certainly this should be taken as a hint that it was not Dave Brubeck but Paul Desmond who was the composer of this 'million seller'. At the recording session, the guitarist Jim Hall was more than a substitute for the piano - he contributed to the quartet a whole new sound colouring which was tinged with the influences of bossa nova.
    The numbers are all easy-going and airy, the melodic lines and sound are filled with transparency. All the while one is curious as to the clear part-writing, and the wealth of ideas emanating from the soloists. This does not only apply to the old favourites Alone Together, Nancy and The One I Love, all three of them arrangements made ad hoc in the studio and which demonstrate how familiar the musicians were with one another, how they listened to one another, answered, and kept the dialogue flowing. The atmosphere is relaxed, and this conveys itself to the listener even after almost half a century.



    RCA's recording and reproduction technology was ahead of its time. The music of these South-American-sounding gems comes out of the loudspeakers with brilliance, clarity and - at last - without the frustrating crackle of a second-hand LP.



    Musicians:



    • Paul Desmond (alto saxophone)

    • Jim Hall (guitar)

    • Gene Cherico, Gene Wright (bass)

    • Connie Kay (drums)




    Recording: 1963 in Webster Hall, New York, by Ray Hall

    Production: George Avakian





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Take Ten
    2. El Prince
    3. Alone Together
    4. Embarcadero
    5. Theme from ''Black Orpheus''
    6. Nancy (With the Laughing Face)
    7. Samba de Orfeu
    8. The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)
    Paul Desmond
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Toto IV (Speakers Corner) Toto IV (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Toto IV (Speakers Corner)

    Anyone who gives the dull name "Four" to their rock album must either be very sure of success or already have resigned. The group Toto may well have experienced such extremes as there was an enormous cleft between their amazing financial success and the crushing negative opinions voiced by the critics. Billboard criticised the superficial lyrics as being void of any sort of emotional weight while the Los Angeles Times aimed their fire at the musicians themselves, slamming them as dubious artists with a commercialised mentality.



    To this Toto struck back with their fourth album, which was an unparalleled success and brought them six Grammy awards. For a whole ten months Africa reigned at Number 1 on the charts and together with the super-hit Rosanna the two smash hits were a constant presence, backed up by a collection of impressive rock classics. A trip to the record shop is all that is needed to prove that this is unlikely to change in the near future. The bright red cover with its depiction of a sword will catch your eye, as though saying: It's got to be the Fourth!



    Musicians:



    • Steve Porcaro, David Paich (keyboard, vocal)

    • Steve Lukather (guitar, vocal)

    • Bobby Kimball (vocal)

    • David Hungate (bass)

    • Jeff Porcaro (drums, percussion)





    Recording: 1982 at Sunset Sound, Los Angeles, by David Leonard, Peggy McCreary & Terry Christian and Record One, Los Angeles, by Jamie Ledner, Niko Bolas & Lon LeMaster

    Production: Toto




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Rosanna
    2. Make Believe
    3. I Won't Hold You Back
    4. Good For You
    5. It's a Feeling
    6. Afraid Of Love
    7. Lovers In The Night
    8. We Made It
    9. Waiting For Your Love
    10. Africa

    Toto
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Splendido Hotel (Speakers Corner) Splendido Hotel (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $64.99
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    x

    Splendido Hotel (Speakers Corner)

    Just how much creative gunpowder had Al Di Meola ignited in his early career? First of all there was the flamenco firework in the best-seller Elegant Gypsy, and secondly his mega-successful live album resulting from a summit meeting in San Francisco with Paco de Lucia and John McLaughlin. After this great start it was no wonder that such prominent colleagues as Jan Hammer, Chick Corea, Steve Gadd, Anthony Jackson and Les Paul were eager to participate in the present album Splendido Hotel.


    This great line-up of musicians produce a rich, saturated sound and create numerous 'flavours' in this cocktail of sounds, which - as a double LP - can be likened to a fantastic long drink, as it were. Di Meola's idea of fusion starts off in the opening number as a slow, sluggish oriental-like melody, which develops to take on a rock rhythm. High-speed and lovingly detailed flamenco such as is found in Splendido Sundance alternates with subtle rhythms (Two To Tango) and good-humoured lighter numbers with an electronic undertone such as Roller Jubilee and a funky version of Bert Kaempfert's Spanish Eyes. With this great mix, the musicians create a wonderful atmosphere in which every Latin aficionado will feel at home.

    Musicians:



    • Al Di Meola (guitar, cello, drums, percussion)

    • Chick Corea (piano)

    • Les Paul (guitar)

    • Jan Hammer (synthesizer)

    • Anthony Jackson (bass)

    • Mingo Lewis (conga, bongo, percussion

    • Philippe Saisse (keyboards, marimba)

    • Steve Gadd (drums)

    • Eddie Colon (percussion)




    Recording: 1979 at CBS Recording and Electric Lady Studios, New York, by Dave Palmer and Love Castle Studios, Los Angeles, by Bernie Kisch

    Production: Al Di Meola and Philip Roberge




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    LP 1
    1. Alien Chase On Arabian Desert
    2. Silent Story In Her Eyes

    3. Roller Jubilee
    4. Two To Tango
    5. Al Di's Dream Theme


    LP 2
    1. Dinner Music Of The Gods

    2. Splendido Sundance
    3. I Can Tell
    4. Spanish Eyes
    5. Isfahan
    6. Bianca's Midnight Lullaby

    Al Di Meola
    $64.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPS Sealed Buy Now
  • Elvis' Christmas Album (Speakers Corner) Elvis' Christmas Album (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Elvis' Christmas Album (Speakers Corner)

    Wild rock'n'roll and Christian spirituality at Christmastide are impossible to bring together musically, one might think. But Elvis, who in the Fifties was climbing as steadily up the ladder of success as Father Christmas coursed the sky in his sleigh, certainly pulled off this feat in his Christmas Album with its mixture of popular Christmas songs and seasonal evergreens. The 'King' delivers a rocking version of Santa Claus Is Back In Town just as successfully as Peace In The Valley, an inspirational gospel song praising nature. Of course it goes without saying that White Christmas - the most-recorded Christmas hit, which in the Bing Crosby version alone achieved sales of 35 million - is included on the album. And Elvis's sentimental interpretation of Silent Night may well have made its contribution to the immortality of the former truck driver from Tennessee. Back on this earth the original LP exchanges hands for around US$ 500 when the gift tag is still attached. And because it's Christmas, the coveted sticker can be found on the re-release.



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Santa Claus Is Back In Town
    2. White Christmas
    3. Here Comes Santa Claus (Right Down Santa Claus Lane)
    4. I'll Be Home For Christmas
    5. Blue Christmas
    6. Santa Bring My Baby Back (To Me)
    7. O Little Town Of Bethlehem
    8. Silent Night
    9. (There'll Be) Peace in the Valley (For Me)
    10. I Believe
    11. Take My Hand, Precious Lord
    12. It Is No Secret (What God Can Do)
    Elvis Presley
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl - Sealed Buy Now
  • Secret Treaties (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) Secret Treaties (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Secret Treaties (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress)

    Back in the days of hard rock and surrounded by fierce competitors with such great names as the Doors, Black Sabbath and the Rolling Stones, a band had to attract attention with far more than histrionic pathos, biker boogie, an adept lead guitarist and a sharp-tongued singer. The band Blue Öyster Cult, founded on Long Island in 1971, possessed all this and much more, relating short scenarios in their lyrics, which conjured up people's imagination. Rolling Stone magazine enthused that it was »like listenin' to Hitchcock and Kubrick swap stories about their wet dreams«, and that the group »mix aesthetics and ass-kicking rock to such good advantage«.



    In their third studio album Secret Treaties, BÖC reached the pinnacle of their musical evolution with such memorable songs as Career Of Evil, Subhuman and Astronomy. The lyrics have literary value but are certainly not intended for sensitive souls - the phrases are direct and intentionally drily articulated. The music is as blatant and extroverted as the lyrics: the guitar sound is steely and straightforward, occasionally padded out with a see-sawing Hammond groove, and topped again and again by wonderfully rough string solos that speak the language of hard, merciless and full-bodied rock.



    Musicians:



    • Eric Bloom (guitar, keyboards, vocal)

    • Allen Lanier (keyboards, guitar, synthesizer)

    • Donald 'Buck Dharma' Roeser (guitar, vocal)

    • Joe Bouchard (bass, vocal)

    • Albert Bouchard (drums, vocal)



    Recording: 1974 by Tim Geelan and Jerry Smith

    Production: Murray Krugman and Sandy Pearlman




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Career of Evil
    2. Subhuman
    3. Dominance and Submission
    4. ME 262
    5. Cagey Cretins
    6. Harvester of Eyes
    7. Flaming Telepaths
    8. Astronomy
    Blue Oyster Cult
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Nilsson Sings Newman (Speakers Corner) Nilsson Sings Newman (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Nilsson Sings Newman (Speakers Corner)

    When two talented, cussed men such as Harry Nilsson and Randy Newman get together to record an album, you can be sure of an exceptional record filled with great vocals and poetry. Nilsson, who is described as a man who performs his songs with one cynical, laughing eye and one nostalgic, tearful eye in Rowohlt's Rock-Lexikon, finds inspiration in the then relatively unknown Newman, a docile but caustic social critic who often attacked American society in his songs.



    In the layers and harmonies achieved partly by overdubbing, and which alternate between cowshed, barbershop and the Beatles, Nilsson manages to make his bitter words somewhat easier to digest. He relates the bizarre chronicle of a couple who have a dull relationship and who morbidly look forward to passing away in an old people's home (Love Story), or he swears his undying love to a certain Caroline in springtime, or he is transported back in time in his mind's eye to an idyllic little town in the countryside (Dayton, Ohio 1903). A weighty musical background would lend nothing to these highly sophisticated songs. Piano chords, a little bit of electric harpsichord, and a tinkle on the organ keys here and there suffice to dally in an old-fashioned manner - with a sarcastic smile or even a nasty grin - in the desolation of reality, without getting the blues.



    Musicians:



    • Harry Nilsson (vocal, keyboards, percussion)

    • Randy Newman (piano)




    Recording: August - October 1969 at RCA's Music Center of the World, Hollywood, by Grover Helsley

    Production: Harry Nilsson





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Vine St.
    2. Love Story
    3. Yellow Man
    4. Caroline
    5. Cowboy
    6. The Beehive State
    7. I'll Be Home
    8. Living Without You
    9. Dayton, Ohio 1903
    10. So Long Dad
    Harry Nilsson
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • A Date With Elvis (Mono) (Speakers Corner) A Date With Elvis (Mono) (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    A Date With Elvis (Mono) (Speakers Corner)

    Good products are worth their weight in gold when times are a little harsh - and this album was certainly a genially placed stopgap. In 1959, at the time when RCA launched this record on the market, the label's shining rock star was out of the country doing his military service in good old Germany. In order to comfort all his fans during his forced absence, the record bosses produced an album with a smartly uniformed Elvis on the cover, smiling widely to let his faithful followers know that he'd be back soon. There was a special calendar too, so that his fans could count off the days until his return. This marketing ploy was extremely successful. The record became a highly desirable collector's item and even years later illegal dollars still flowed from pirate copies.
    The RCA producers kept mum about when and where the tracks were recorded. But who cares about that when listening to Elvis giving the 'blue grass' classic Blue Moon Of Kentucky his unmistakable, rockabilly sound? The other titles, all of them performed by a well-proven ensemble of rock-'n'-roll musicians, are filled with the honest, powerful language of the young - or from today's viewpoint, old - Elvis. Which takes us back full circle to the date. What better way is there to celebrate the 50th birthday of rock-'n'-roll than with this early album by its 'King'?





    Musicians:



    • Elvis Presley (guitar, vocal)

    • Scotty Moore (guitar)

    • Bill Black (bass)

    • D.J. Fontana (drums)

    • The Jordanaires (vocal)




    Recording: July 1954 at Memphis Recording Service, Memphis, Tennessee (USA), and other venues till 1957

    Production: Sam Phillips




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Blue Moon of Kentucky Monroe 2:05
    2. Young and Beautiful Schroeder, Silver 2:07
    3. (You're So Square) Baby I Don't Care
    4. Milk Cow Blues Arnold 2:38
    5. Baby Let's Play House Gunter 2:18
    6. Good Rockin' Tonight Brown 2:12
    7. Is It So Strange Young 2:32
    8. We're Gonna Move Matson, Presley 2:31
    9. I Want to Be Free Leiber, Stoller 2:16
    10. I Forgot to Remember to Forget 2:27
    Elvis Presley
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl Mono LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Inner Mounting Flame (Speakers Corner) The Inner Mounting Flame (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Inner Mounting Flame (Speakers Corner)

    The liner notes for The Inner Mounting Flame were written by the guru Sri Chinmoy - now that's a real sales point! The music too burns right from the very first note to the last as though it were licked by the flames of hell fire.



    The wealth of ideas, sheer vitality and supreme soloistic virtuosity of the five top-notch musicians from four different countries is absolutely first class. In addition there is their truly dreamlike interplay; one could say they were born and grew up with the same 'spirit'. Meeting Of The Spirit, The Dance Of Maya and You Know You Know are the highlights of this first Mahavishnu Orchestra.



    Aspiration - struggle, hope and desire - is seen as an inner mounting flame which takes man towards 'divine perfection'. Well, opinions differ of course. But what is certain is that this music from 1971 is still amazingly fresh and creative even 36 years later - and luckily it is available once again in the form of a vinyl disc.



    Musicians:



    • John McLaughlin (guitar)

    • Jan Hammer (piano)

    • Jerry Goodman (violin)

    • Rick Laird (bass)

    • Billy Cobham (drums)




    Recording: August 1971 in New York City by Don Puluse

    Production: John McLaughlin





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Meeting of the Spirits
    2. Dawn
    3. Noonward Race, The
    4. A Lotus on Irish Streams
    5. Vital Transformation
    6. Dance of Maya, The
    7. You Know You Know
    8. Awakening
    Mahavishnu Orchestra
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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