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  • The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner) The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner)

    After the break-up of John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in the summer of 1967, the time seemed ripe for Peter Green, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood to take their leave from raw British rock 'n' roll. The newly established band Fleetwood Mac first turned to black blues, and their art of playing was so similar to that of other groups that the magazine Eye criticised them for their »almost ridiculous mimicry«. However, their choice of performance style took them in the right direction and in 1969, the year in which The Pious Bird Of Good Omen appeared, they landed at the top end of the pop charts, even ahead of The Beatles and Stevie Wonder.



    Of course, in the cover version of Little Willie John's Need Your Love So Bad, which is treated with a velvety string sound, and other bluesy songs, the American influence still makes itself heard, but not without success! The highly individual sound of the group comes best through in the now legendary numbers such as the weightless, gliding Albatross and Black Magic Woman with its Latin and blues elements. Judged the best British blues ever to be played (allmusic.com), one can now sit back and enjoy this great album.



    Musicians:



    • Peter Green (guitar, vocal)

    • Jeremy Spencer (guitar, piano, vocal)

    • Danny Kirwan (guitar)

    • Eddie Boyd (piano, vocal)

    • Big Walter Horton (harmonica)

    • John McVie (bass)

    • Mick Fleetwood (drums)




    Recorded between September 1967 and October 1968 by Mike Ross

    Production: Mike Vernon





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Need Your Love So Bad
    2. Comin' Home
    3. Rambling Pony
    4. The Big Boat
    5. I Believe My Time Ain't Long
    6. The Sun Is Shining
    7. Albatross
    8. Black Magic Woman
    9. Just The Blues
    10. Jigsaw Puzzle Blues
    11. Looking For Somebody
    12. Stop Messin' Round

    Fleetwood Mac
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner) Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
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    Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner)

    It was clear from the start that Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, with its air of solemnity in the final chorus, which calls for brotherly love just as the New Year comes in, would become a musical part of our world's cultural legacy. Hundreds of minds, Beethoven researcher Karl Nef prophesied, have been set in motion by this music in the most varied ways, and it will continue not only to bestow pleasure upon countless thousands, but also to stimulate mental life right at the most fundamental level.



    There are certainly only a very few truly cerebral interpretations which stand out from the fathomless mass of recordings. One of those upon which "The Absolute Sound" journal has stamped its coveted seal of approval is the recording with Georg Solti and his perfectly honed symphony musicians from Chicago. Here, this usually somewhat daring baton-wielder plumbs the very depths of the score and allows Beethoven's rich abundance of ideas to ferment into a great whole.



    The four soloists prove their worth as first choice for the richly detailed and balanced synopsis of this fissured work. They captivate us as much in the solo as in the group singing with their natural and expressive intonation. The dry, very present sound highlights the fact that this is an artistic performance at the highest level.




    Musicians:



    • Pilar Lorengar, Stuart Burrows, and other soloists

    • The Chicago Symphony Chorus & Orchestra

    • Sir Georg Solti (conductor)




    Recording: May 1972 in the Krannert Centre of the University of Illinois, Chicago, by Kenneth Wilkinson and Gordon Parry

    Production: David Harvey



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    Ludwig Van Beethoven
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Beck, Bogert & Appice (Speakers Corner) Beck, Bogert & Appice (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Beck, Bogert & Appice (Speakers Corner)

    On the whole, the supergroups of the Seventies didn't last very long, but for that - all the more notably. This certainly applies to the Anglo-American trio made up of the extremely talented though narcissistic guitarist Jeff Beck, the bass-player Tim Bogert, and the drummer Carmine Appice. As early as 1970, the British Beck wanted to engage the two American musicians for a joint project. This plan however had to be postponed for two years because the speed-mad Beck had had a serious car accident and needed time to recover. 1973 saw the release of the trio's first and only studio album, which not only demonstrated Beck's powerful-hectic style of guitar playing but also allowed his musical companions to show off their prowess. The trio applied their musical talents to all facets of rock 'n' roll, right from the bluesy first number (Black Cat Moan), via the agile rock sound of Lady, ending up with the moans of a vocal love ballad (Oh To Love You), followed by a really convincing gospel song (Sweet And Surrender) and the super funky beat of Lose Myself With You.
    The trio seemed to lust for more - but this was not to be. For the very next year, during the intense preparations for their next studio album, the moody Jeff Beck dissolved the group on the spur of the moment.



    Musicians:



    • Jeff Beck (guitar, vocal)

    • Jimmy Greenspoon (piano)

    • Duane Hitchings (keyboards,melophone, piano)

    • Tim Bogert (bass)

    • Carmine Appice (drums, vocal)

    • Danny Hutton (background vocal)




    Recording: 1973 by Baker Bigsby and Gray Starr

    Production: Don Nix and The Boys




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Black Cat Moan
    2. Lady
    3. Oh To Love You
    4. Superstition
    5. Sweet Surrender
    6. Why Should I Care
    7. Lose Myself With You
    8. Livin' Alone
    9. I'm So Alone
    Jeff Beck, Tim Bogert & Carmine Apprice
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner) The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $95.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner)

    The attempts that have been made to describe Glenn Gould's complex personality are endless in number, as are his surprising and often eccentric interpretations. Whether he is considered to be a sensitive maniac, neurotic individualist or uncompromising genius - Gould polarises, provokes and fascinates us long after his death in 1982. As early as 1964 the Canadian pianist ceased to give concerts, since he found appearing before an audience completely unacceptable and preferred to concentrate on studio recordings.



    Way in front of composers of the Viennese Classical era, which he did not take particularly seriously - although his performances keenly reflect Beethoven's rhythmicity - comes his personal deity: Bach. Gould's notorious strictness gives form to the minutest of figure in the score. He weaves his way through Bach's music and thereby articulates its tightly knit and multi-facetted depths. No lecturing keyboard proponent this, but a creative co-composer who imbues the spirit of the music with life and sonority. Upon the release in 1980 of the 80th Birthday Edition with its wealth of visual and tonal material, the music journalist Werner Theurich wrote that »no one had ever played more raptly, or more intensively. That Gould's performances are nothing but heavenly can be seen and felt. The rest is pure music.«




    Recording: April 1957, May 1967 and February 1969 at Columbia 30th Street Studio, New York City, by Fred Plaut

    Production: Andrew Kazdin




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    The Bach Keyboard Concertos J. S. Bach: Keyboard Concertos Nos. 1-5 and 7
    L. v. Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 1 - Glenn Gould, the Columbia Symphony Orchestra conducted by Vladimir Golschmann and Leonard Bernstein
    Glenn Gould
    $95.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Box Set - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Emergency Ward (Speakers Corner) Emergency Ward (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
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    Emergency Ward (Speakers Corner)

    We can thank our lucky stars that Nina Simone was well aware of her musical environment and enjoyed experimenting with it, despite her notorious eccentric personality. This was the only reason that so much basic repertoire, traditional blues numbers, black work songs and favourite white show melodies - all filled with a deep soul feeling - reached her fans. Emergency Ward! is no exception. First there is the explosive medley, recorded live, of George Harrison's My Sweet Lord and David Nelson's Today Is A Killer. Accompanied by a small combo and a gospel choir, Nina Simone ignites an 18-minute blazing bonfire which loses none of its spiritual fire for even a second.



    In contrast to the gentle Poppies, extravagantly produced with strings, woodwinds and chorus, is the questioning Isn't It A Pity, arranged for piano. Here, simple, throbbing harmonies are occasionally allowed to swell into clouds of chords, giving Nina Simone the opportunity to show off her highly diversified vocal timbre which, as so often, fades away into nothing like an unanswered question. This is an exceptional album filled with a wealth of feeling and one which will leave no one untouched.



    Musicians:



    • Nina Simone (piano, vocal)

    • Sam Waymon (vocal)

    • Orchestra




    Recording: November 1971 at Fort Dix and February 1972 at RCA Victor's Studio A,
    New York City, by Ed Begley

    Production: Nina Simone, Andrew Stroud and Weldon J. Irvine Jr.





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. My Sweet Lord
    2. Today is a Killer
    3. Poppies
    4. Isn't It a Pity
    Nina Simone
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Chuck Mangione Quartet (Speakers Corner) The Chuck Mangione Quartet (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Chuck Mangione Quartet (Speakers Corner)

    Now - in which pigeonhole that the innumerable self-proclaimed jazz critics like to create does this release from 1971 fit? Jazz-rock, jazz-fusion, soul-jazz-rock-fusion, electro-fusion-pop? Perhaps we can all agree that we should just enjoy these quartet recordings!


    These recordings, all of them absolutely fantastic numbers, have been made by flugelhornist Chuck Mangione with his marvellous quartet without a piano in a sort of 'jam session'. The band members are absolutely top notch with Ron Davis on drums, Joel DiBartolo on the double bass, and Gerry Niewood (still underestimated and mostly known as a sideman) on the soprano saxophone and flute (which is his foremost instrument although the more hushed one). On this LP, which has long been out of print, Chuck Mangione comes into the limelight in wonderfully melodic and mellow solos such as Land Of Make Believe and Little Sunflower - and the latter certainly needs not fear a comparison with the original by Freddie Hubbard! And Manha De Carnival, composed by guitarist Luis Bonfá is especially worth listening to for the amazing improvisations which have been set down for all times. Mercury's recording technology was of the very best in the Seventies, and that makes itself heard when listening to this recording on a new high-end vinyl LP instead of the original pressing.

    Musicians:



    • Chuck Mangione (fluegel horn, electric piano, percussion)

    • Gerry Niewood (flute, soprano saxophone, tuba, guiro)

    • Joel Di Bartolo (bass)

    • Ron Davis (drums, conga, percussion)




    Recording: 1971 at Mercury Sound Studio, New York, by Chuck Irwin

    Production: Chuck Mangione




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Land of Make Believe
    2. Self Portrait
    3. Little Sunflower
    4. Floating
    5. Manha de Carnival
    Chuck Mangione
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Forest Flower (Speakers Corner) Forest Flower (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Forest Flower (Speakers Corner)

    It was a clever move by George Avakian, producer at Atlantic Records, to record live the Charles Lloyd Quartet during their appearance in Monterey, and to release the LP under the title Forest Flower. Although the hippy flower-power movement tended towards a rather different musical genre at the end of the Sixties, they were blown away by this music. The four artists attracted masses of people and ensured that every seat was taken and all standing room filled at jazz festivals such as Newport, Molde (Norway), Antibes (France) and the Fillmore East and West. The super group also appeared in Monterey, 120 Km south of San Francisco, the centre of the hippy movement, on 18 September 1966.


    On the LP we have the almost 18-minute-long title piece and the standard work East Of The Sun, which were recorded at the festival. The disc is complemented by a Keith Jarrett composition and one by Cecil McBee, both of which were recorded in the studio ten days before the festival.
    Of particular note is the rich interplay, the energy that is palpable throughout, the perfect harmony in each and every change of mood, and the intensity. Even 50 years later, it is quite clear that Charles Lloyd managed to break down the barriers between pop and jazz.


    Charles Lloyd is committed to this objective to this very day! All four musicians are still active, although they no longer appear together as a group. Such a special treat for the ears is offered by this newly mastered disc only

    Musicians:



    • Charles Lloyd (tenor saxophone, flute)
    • Keith Jarrett (piano)
    • Cecil McBee (bass)
    • Jack DeJohnette (drums)



    Recording: September 1966 live at Monterey Jazz Festival by Wally Heider

    Production: George Avakian




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Forest Flower - Sunrise
    2. Forest Flower - Sunset
    3. Sorcery
    4. Song Of Her
    5. East Of The Sun
    Charles Lloyd
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Aretha Live At Fillmore West (Speakers Corner) Aretha Live At Fillmore West (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Aretha Live At Fillmore West (Speakers Corner)

    Live recordings come up with extremely different results: most of them land in the rubbish bin, some of them are available as bootleg copies when a star's career has ended and are passed on conspiratorially from one excited collector to another. Only a very few conserve real spirit and sheer enthusiasm, which no arranger or sound mixer can conjure up in the studio.


    But even more sensational was Aretha Franklin's guest appearance at the Fillmore West, the legendary concert hall in San Francisco, which closed down shortly afterwards. Everyone knew who was going to perform, and yet everything was quite different on these three nights in the spring of 1971: her usual show band was left behind in Detroit and she appeared with King Curtis And The Kingpins - one of the most impressive bands around - accompanied by the trailblazers Cornel Dupree (g) and Bernard Purdie (dr). The Memphis Horns, a fantastic horn section, blast away in the background, their keen as a razor backings rising up to soaring heights. From Billy Preston's fingertips on the organ flows an aura of spiritual energy and Ray Charles, who by chance (but how fortuitous!) was among the audience also got his appearance in the telling title Spirit In The Dark. No words need be lost about the queen on the cover. For without the superb albums of the late Sixties, Aretha Franklin would never have become the USA's first sister of soul nor would she have appeared in the Fillmore West.


    Musicians:

    Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles (vocals, electric piano)

    King Curtis (tenor saxophone, soprano saxophone)

    Billy Preston (organ)

    Truman Thomas (Electric Piano)

    Cornell Dupree (guitar)

    Jerry Jemmot (bass)

    Bernard Purdie (drums)

    Pancho Morales (conga)



    Recording: February 1975 live at Fillmore West, San Francisco, by Ray Thompson

    Production: Jerry Wexler and Arif Mardin

    About Speakers Corner


    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.


    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.


    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.


    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.


    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.


    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Respect
    2. Love The One You're With
    3. Bridge Over Troubled Water
    4. Eleanor Rigby
    5. Make It With You
    6. Don't Play That Song
    7. Dr. Feelgood
    8. Spirit In The Dark
    9. Reach Out And Touch (Somebody's Hand)
    Aretha Franklin
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Graduate (Speakers Corner) (On Sale) The Graduate (Speakers Corner) (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $34.99 $27.64

    Buy Now
    x

    The Graduate (Speakers Corner) (On Sale)

    With his film The Graduate, which was crowned with an Oscar and five Golden Globes, director Mike Nichols created far more than just the story of the erotic initiation of the college graduate Benjamin. Not only the scenario but also the production modalities were revolutionary. For the very first time the crusted morals of the American upper class were attacked by means of film, an Alfa Romeo - a European car - was advertised most effectively, and a soundtrack was put together from already existent, successful pop numbers. No words are really necessary about the music, since numbers such as Sound Of Silence, Mrs. Robinson and Scarborough Fair have entered into the annals of musical culture ever since they were used in the film. It is astounding to note how seamlessly the various works fit snugly into the film's context, as though they had been specially written for the scenes.



    This soundtrack is a monument to Dustin Hoffman, who played his first big role in the film, and it catapulted Simon & Garfunkel right to the top of the list of ballad singers. But it also recalls to memory the peppy, instrumental insertion numbers by Dave Grusin, who virtually fell into oblivion after all the hype about this provocative movie.



    Musicians:



    • Paul Simon (guitar, vocal)

    • Art Garfunkel (vocal)

    • Dave Grusin




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1.The Sound Of Silence - Simon And Garfunkel
    2. The Singleman Party Foxtrot - David Grusin
    3. Mrs. Robinson - Simon And Garfunkel
    4. Sunporch Cha-Cha-Cha - David Grusin
    5. Scarborough Fair / Canticle (Inerlude) - Simon And Garfunkel
    6. On The Strip - David Grusin
    7. April Come She Will - Simon And Garfunkel
    8. The Folks - David Grusin
    9. Scarborough Fair / Canticle - Simon And Garfunkel
    10. A Great Effect - David Grusin
    11. The Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine - Simon And Garfunkel
    12. Whew - David Grusin
    13. Mrs. Robinson - Simon And Garfunkel
    14. The Sound Of Silence - Simon And Garfunkel
    Simon & Garfunkel
    $34.99 $27.64
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Crossings (Speakers Corner) (Pre-Order) Crossings (Speakers Corner) (Pre-Order) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Crossings (Speakers Corner) (Pre-Order)

    In the 1970s, Herbie Hancock's Crossings was to be found on every IKEA record shelf in the student pads of jazz-fusion fans. The cover, with its psychedelic touch, also contributed significantly to its popularity - although it was unclear where the crossing was going to take us


    Nevertheless, the excellent trumpeter Eddie Henderson - often underestimated as an improviser and composer, and Benny Maupin - who like Hancock had grown up under Miles Davis's wing, present a wide range of sound-generating instruments - as was all the rage in those days. Synthesizer and Mellotron (a polyphonic tape replay keyboard and as such practically the prototype of the sampler) were permanent members of the group - and even produce here melodic arches of sound! Whether Bennie Maupin's Quasar launches the group and us into extraterrestrial territory (as stated in one review) is a moot point.


    This LP is a contemporary historical document, though it certainly doesn't sound antiquated. That's why younger listeners too will find pleasure in this experiment from the previous millennium.


    Musicians:



    • Herbie Hancock (electric-piano, piano, mellotron, percussion)

    • Bennie Maupin (soprano saxophone, flute, bass clarinet, piccolo flute, percussion)

    • Eddie Henderson (trumpet, flugelhorn, percussion)

    • Julian Priester (trombonbe, percussion)

    • Patrick Gleeson (synthesizer)

    • Buster Williams (bass, percussion)

    • Billy Hart (drums, percussion)



    Recording: February 1972 at Pacific Recording Studios, San Mateo, CA., by Patrick Gleason

    Production: David Rubinson



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Sleeping Giant
    2. Quasar
    3. Water Torture
    Herbie Hancock
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed PRE-ORDER Buy Now
  • Burgers (Speakers Corner) Burgers (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Burgers (Speakers Corner)

    The exploration of psychedelic depths did not appear to suffice the founders of Jefferson Airplane - Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady - when searching for their musical salvation. So why not amalgamate their hippy-like simple lifestyle and folksy music with the formation of a second band called Hot Tuna, emotional yet not so synthetically hotted-up? Even in the very first number, True Religion, whose airy, bubbling folksy finger-picking soars up into powerful waves of rock, the message of this first studio album comes over loud and clear. Growling bass melodies and the representation of a life on the road (Keep On Truckin') conjure up a down-to-earth country feeling, with an off-key fiddle tune (Let Us Get Together Right Down Here) accentuating the rough yet cordial get-together. The purely instrumental Water Song is a stroke of genius - this humming, buzzing guitar mix doesn't only demonstrate the players' instrumental dexterity but also their keen sense of melody and ear for sound colouring. No matter whether gruff Hillbilly, cool blues rocker, or square and nostalgic former hippy - they'll all love this album. Just think: for whom else does Hot Tuna still go on tour ...?

    Musicians:



    • Jorma Kaukonen (guitar, vocal)

    • Jack Casady (bass, vocal)

    • Papa John Creach (violin, vocal)

    • Sammy Piazza (drums, percussion, vocal)

    • Nikki Buck (organ, piano)

    • Richmond Talbott (vocal, guitar)

    • David Crosby (vocal)




    Recording: 1972 by 'The Unknown Engineer' at Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco

    Production: Fisohobay Production



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. True Religion
    2. Highway Song
    3. 99 Year blues
    4. Sea Child
    5. Keep on Truckin'
    6. Water Song
    7. Ode for Billy Dean
    8. Let Us Get Together Right Down Here
    9. Sunny Day Strut
    Hot Tuna
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • In Hollywood (Speakers Corner) In Hollywood (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    In Hollywood (Speakers Corner)

    When stringed instruments are employed, it is often an indication that the protagonist is somewhat mature. It is an unwritten law that sooner or later every rock, jazz or folk musician will bathe in soft tones for once. Chet Atkins, however, was light years away from his artistic zenith, came up with a wealth of ideas and was in a great position with regards to recording facilities when he set down his Hollywood album in 1959. Two years earlier, "Mister Guitar" had become boss of the newly founded RCA Studio in Nashville. Here he recorded several records, which reflected his ideas of an appealing, catchy Nashville Sound as an answer to the declining rock and roll.


    The Hollywood numbers were by no means dynamite movie tracks or showstoppers. Dennis Farnon's delicate, lush arrangements rather more pay homage to the maestro with his no-frills art of playing. The gentle Italo evergreen Santa Lucia, Chaplin's beautiful Limelight with its violins and the time-honoured Greensleeves - all of them flawlessly performed - are a real pleasure for the ears. Atkins greatly admired the superb string orchestra and two years later he re-recorded the album using the tapes from the Hollywood session to create this new version.

    Musicians:



    • Chet Atkins (guitar)
    • Howard Roberts (guitar)
    • Jethro Burns (mandolin)
    • Clifford Hils (bass)
    • George Callender (bass)
    • Larry Bunker (drum & strings)
    • Jack Sperling(drum & strings)


    Recording: October 1958 in Hollywood

    Production: Chet Atkins




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    1. Armen's Theme
    2. Let It Be Me
    3. Theme From Picnic
    4. Theme From A Dream
    5. Estrelita
    6. Jitterbug Waltz
    7. Little Old Lady
    8. Limelight
    9. The Three Bells
    10. Santa Lucia
    11. Greensleeves
    12. Meet Mr. Callaghan
    Chet Atkins
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Joan Armatrading (Speakers Corner) Joan Armatrading (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Joan Armatrading (Speakers Corner)

    "Where are all the voices gone?" A good question in today's bizarre musical world of video clips and techno where one searches in vain for a tender, sweet-perfumed flower.



    But it's really not so important - as long as we can still find music's bedrock, so to speak, or are even lucky enough to have it in our audiophile treasure chest. Now that numerous pop groups have finished crossing the dark valley of electronic sensationalism, and "unplugged" sound is accepted as the true ideal in the '90s, it is precisely the music from years gone by that has suddenly become "in" once again. Here we find all the ingredients of good, basic song tradition: a great deal of natural singing, refined guitar sound, a little steel guitar, and a pinch of Wurlitzer organ.



    This recording from 1976 was Joan Armatrading's first step on the ladder to a sensational career which has not yet come to an end - perhaps because she has remained to her own original style. The album is just right for teenies and twens wanting to discover the soft, rock-like ballads from the days when their dads had long hair and wore "John-Lennon" glasses. For the older generation it is like re-visiting old times - times when music was really "handmade".



    Musicians:



    • Joan Amatrading (guitar, vocals)

    • Jimmy Jewell (saxophone)

    • Peter Wood (organ, piano, keyboards)

    • Bryn Haworth (guitar, mandolin)

    • Graham Lyle, Jerry Donahue (guitar)

    • Dave Markee (bass)

    • Tony Carr (drums)




    Recording : 1976 at Olympic Studios, London by Glyn Jones
    Production: Glyn Jones




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Down to Zero
    2. Help Yourself
    3. Water With the Wine
    4. Love and Affection
    5. Same Me
    6. Join the Boys
    7. People
    8. Somebody Who Loves You
    9. Like Fire
    10. Tall in the Saddle
    Joan Armatrading
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Paradise & Lunch (Speakers Corner) Paradise & Lunch (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Paradise & Lunch (Speakers Corner)

    A good 20 years have passed since a band with ancient musicians from Cuba - the Buena Vista Social Club - took the world by storm. Behind the project, in the wings yet right in the midst of this unheard-of music, was Ry Cooder, who regarded this encounter as the greatest musical event of his entire life. The bottleneck guitar hero had always been very interested in the music from the other Americas ever since the solo albums he made in his early years, in which he told the story of the American folk and blues in a multitude of styles. The LP Paradise And Lunch is no exception and begins with gospel-like grooves that smell of native soil. The faint smell of a wooden church from pioneering days wafts out of the processional antiphonal song Jesus On The Mainline and a healthy 12-bar blues paints a picture of what silent witnesses could tell if they could (If Walls Could Talk). Cooder and his sidemen felt themselves perfectly at home when adventuring further afield and this is testified to in the laid-back calypso rhythm of It's All Over Now and the clip-clop of Mexican Divorce.


    This wonderful album is highly recommended for each and every number, but if you want a tip for a very special track, then just listen to the ragtime piano rolls in Bo Diddley's Ditty Wah Ditty.


    Musicians:



    • Ry Cooder (guitar, mandolin, bass, vocal)

    • Ronnie Barron (piano, organ)

    • Earl Hines (piano)

    • Plas Johnson (alto saxophone)

    • Oscar Brashear (cornet)

    • Red Callender (bass)

    • John Duke (bass)

    • Russ Titelman (electric bass)

    • Chris Ethridge (electric bass)

    • Milt Holland (drums, percussion)

    • Jim Keltner (drums)




    Recording: 1974 at the Warner Brothers Studios in North Hollywood and Burbank (USA), by Lee Herschberg

    Production: Lenny Waronker & Russ Titelman




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Tamp 'Em Up Solid
    2. Tattler
    3. Married Man's a Fool
    4. Jesus on the Mainline
    5. It's All Over Now
    6. Fool for a Cigarette/Feelin' Good
    7. If Walls Could Talk
    8. Mexican Divorce
    9. Ditty Wah Ditty
    Ry Cooder
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Handel - Water Music - Fireworks Music (Speakers Corner) Handel - Water Music - Fireworks Music (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Handel - Water Music - Fireworks Music (Speakers Corner)

    Composed in the spirit of the Baroque, the Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music were written by the highly regarded George Frideric Handel on commissions from Kings George I and George II of England.



    The remarkable première of the Water Music - a suite of instrumental airs, fanfares, dances, and other delights - was played in 1717 by musicians in a barge who entertained the King and his entourage on a banquet held on board the royal barge which travelled up and down the river Thames. According to reports at the time, Handel's new work was greeted with unanimous acclaim.



    Music appeared equally fitting for the solemn but festive commemoration of a peace treaty. The Royal Fireworks Music - originally scored for brass, oboes and bassoons, plus timpani and the bizarre serpent horn - was composed in 1749 for the victory gala in London's Green Park celebrating the Peace of Aix-La-Chapelle.



    In both pieces Georg Szell and the London Symphony Orchestra conjure up the full splendour of baroque tonality. Orchestra and conductor are clearly in a festive mood. The strings show rare form, lush and radiant. The brass are brilliant but never shrill. The atmosphere is transparent, the spatial effects are impressive.



    For the outstanding quality of this recording we are indebted not least to its inspired recording engineer, Kenneth E. Wilkinson.






    Musicians:



    • London Symphony Orchestra

    • George Szell (conductor)




    Recording: August 1961 at Watford Town Hall, Watford by Kenneth E. Wilkinson
    Production: John Culshaw





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Georg Szell with the London Symphony Orchestra
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bruckner: Symphony No. 5 / Mozart: Symphony No. 36 (Speakers Corner) Bruckner: Symphony No. 5 / Mozart: Symphony No. 36 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bruckner: Symphony No. 5 / Mozart: Symphony No. 36 (Speakers Corner)

    Eugen Jochum was a modest man who did not use the media to draw attention to himself but rather to document his musical intentions. And right from the very beginning he focussed on magnitude. Aged only 23, he made his debut in Munich with Bruckner's Symphony No. 7 and so laid the foundations for his lifelong devotion to the Austrian composer's works, as is demonstrated by his complete recording of the Symphonies that was made during the years 1958-1967. The present account of the Fifth Symphony was recorded roughly half way through his thorough exploration and study of Bruckner's symphonic works. From the very beginning, the Concertgebouw Orchestra strides majestically towards the Finale with its sonorous brass sound in the chorale, and fugal sections. A divine atmosphere is guaranteed - quite literally - by the work being performed in the hallowed halls of the Benedictine Abbey in Ottobeuren to celebrate its foundation 1200 years ago.



    Jochum's fresh and scholarly account of Mozart's "Linz" Symphony reminds us of his superb mastery of the Viennese Classics. The music, which ranges from festive cheerfulness to abrupt gloominess, is resolutely conducted - with the happy result that the hackneyed image of Jochum as an otherworldly specialist of the Romantic era is completely abolished. Measured against the conductor's self-concept as a universal medium for expressing the ideas of the great maestros, the present recording is a befitting portrait of his superb versatility on the rostrum.





    Recording: May 1964 at Benedictiner Abbey, Ottobeuren, Germany, by Henk Jansen

    Production: Jaap van Ginneke



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 5 in B flat major
    2. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Symphony No. 36 in C major, K.425 (Linz)
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner) The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner)

    The Doobie Brothers weren't brothers, nor were they called Doobie. The band started life as Pud in 1969 in Chateau LibertÉ, a club in the mountains of California. The group took on the slang name for marihuana cigarettes (doobie) one year later. The Doobies' music, however, never sounded like that of befuddled, half-stoned junkies. Heavy metal hard rock was their thing which made their record company Warner target the bikers of the rocker scene. The idea backfired, though, because the band had far more to offer than explosive hard rock.



    The album The Captain And Me is considered to be the group's most concentrated and versatile production since it contrasts aggressive, hard numbers with gentle ones full of melodiousness. The very first number, Natural Thing, shows how winsome vocal folk music and electric guitar riffs can be amalgamated into rock music. Amongst these titles, decidedly angry numbers such as Without You and Evil Woman became real trailblazers. Now and then, an extensive harp solo or nonchalant licks from the acoustic guitar remind one of the pungent bluegrass style emanating from the South. That even the sweet wailing of the steel guitar (South City Midnight Lady) finds room for expression seems quite logical in this well-thought-out musical concept.



    Musicians:



    • Tom Johnston (guitar, harmonica, synthesizer, vocals)

    • Patrick Simmons (guitar, synthesizer, vocals)

    • John Hartman (percussion, drums, vocals)

    • Tiran Porter (bass, vocals)

    • Michael Hossack (drums, conga, percussion)



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Natural Thing
    2. Long Train Runnin'
    3. China Grove
    4. Dark Eyed Cajun Woman
    5. Clear As The Driven Snow
    6. Without You
    7. South City Midnight Lady
    8. Evil Woman
    9. Ukiah
    10. The Captain And Me
    The Doobie Brothers
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Holst: The Planets (Speakers Corner) Holst: The Planets (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Holst: The Planets (Speakers Corner)

    Earth was not created in a day. And the same applies to Gustav Holst's interplanetary symphony which took him about three years to write. The composer employs a massive orchestra and rich orchestral colouring to portray each planet in his musical psychogram.



    Mars, the Bringer of War, rages with mechanical brutality, while Venus brings peace and an acceptance of life. Mercury, the Winged Messenger, darts here and there with quicksilver speed, while powerful and sovereign Jupiter brings jollity and reassurance. Saturn plods by with heavy tread, while Uranus with its contrasting changes in tempo remains enigmatic and extrovert. And because Pluto, the most distant planet had not yet been discovered, it is Neptune, the great unknown, which is lost in time and space in an endless ostinato of female voices.
    Zubin Mehta and the Los Angeles Philharmonic present this astronomical journey with precision and exhilaration, leaving neither time nor space for astrological speculation. As always, the excellent DECCA recording quality guarantees an unimpeded view of this musical galaxy.



    Recording: April 1971 at Royce Hall, Los Angeles by James Lock and Colin Moorfoot

    Production: John Mordler




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Holst: The Planets
    Zubin Mehta
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Call Me (Speakers Corner) Call Me (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Call Me (Speakers Corner)

    What connects celebrity chefs and pop stars is their fine nose for ingredients, especially when hot and spicy ones are mixed with milder elements to create an aromatic result. A combination of 'sweet' and 'funky' is the secret of Al Green's gloriously sentimental and sensual pop songs, which in the sexually free Seventies were often referred to as »songs to make love by«. What swings along gently is, however, Al Green's subtly controlled falsetto, which he can tone right to the threshold of audibility. But watch out! This music belts out some fiery sounds right from the very first number. The sinuous, swinging request in the brilliant hit single Call Me, the relaxed and groovy Stand Up, with its sharp wind interjections which demand one's unerring attention, are typical for Green's style, just as is his almost disturbing capability to gain comfort from loneliness (I'm So Lonesome, I Could Cry). This rhythmically powered music can best be described as light, intensive, dynamic but never flashy (Your Love Is Like The Morning Sun). It finds its earthly culmination in soul (I'm Waiting) and spiritual depth.



    Musicians:



    • Al Green (vocal)

    • James Mitchell (bassoon, arranger)

    • Andrew Love (tenor sax)

    • Jack Hale (trombone)

    • Wayne Jackson (trumpet)

    • Mabon Hodges (guitar)

    • Charles Hodges (keyboards)

    • Archie Turner (piano)

    • Leroy Hodges (bass)

    • Howard Grimes (drums)

    • The Memphis Strings



    Recording: 1973 at Royal Recording Studios, Memphis, TN, by Willie Mitchell

    Production: Al Green and Willie Mitchell




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Call Me (Come Back Home)
    2. Have You Been Making out O.K.
    3. Stand Up
    4. I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry
    5. Your Love Is Like the Morning Sun
    6. Here I Am (Come and Take Me)
    7. Funny How Time Slips Away
    8. You Ought to Be with Me
    9. Jesus Is Waiting
    Al Green
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Tyranny And Mutation (Speakers Corner) Tyranny And Mutation (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Tyranny And Mutation (Speakers Corner)

    Let's look back nostalgically to the days when influential DJs presented their precious wares on the radio, which were lapped up by listeners and music pirates alike. That progressive, perhaps psycho, rockers such as the Blue Öyster Cult led a somewhat niche existence makes one all the more eager to listen to the truly awesome discs recorded by this group in their early days. An important start was made with the re-release of BÖC's Secret Treaties (Columbia KC 32858), which is now followed by Tyranny And Mutation - another great disc. Although the band offers a mix of slightly subdued, milder pieces, the opening number The Red & The Black makes it fully clear that we are in for a dizzy roller-coaster ride here. Subsequently the Black side with its straightforward guitar riffs is mixed together with a complex melody and results in an amazingly colourful sound (O.D.'d On Life Itself), it is refreshingly naive, full of feisty complicated rock (Baby Ice Dog), and soars to celestial heights in Wings Wetted Down with its polyphonic male voices.


    After the death of 'Lemmy' Kilmister in 2015, we can now enjoy only one group with a heavy-metal Umlaut in its name. But who wants to wait around until some radio DJ puts this great chunk of meaty rock'n'roll on the turntable?

    Musicians:



    • Eric Bloom (guitar, keyboards, vocal)

    • Allen Lanier (keyboards, guitar)

    • Donald 'Buck Dharma' Roeser (guitar, vocal)

    • Joe Bouchard (bass, vocal, keyboards)

    • Albert Bouchard (drums, vocal)



    Recording: 1972 at Columbia Studios, New York City, by Tim Geelan

    Production: Murray Krugman and Sandy Pearlman




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. The Red & The Black
    2. O.D.'d On Life Itself
    3. Hot Rails To Hell
    4. 7 Screaming Diz-Busters
    5. Baby Ice Dog
    6. Wings Wetted Down
    7. Teen Archer
    8. Mistress Of The Salmon Salt (Quicklime Girl)
    Blue Oyster Cult
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Afro Classic (Speakers Corner) Afro Classic (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Afro Classic (Speakers Corner)

    In the Seventies, fusion was a popular pigeonhole for music somewhere between jazz and pop. At the same time it was also an often used, belittling term employed by critics and representatives of 'pure' jazz, who never wanted to listen to it, let alone include any of the numerous LPs in their collection.



    Forty years later, the dust has settled. Flautist Hubert Laws' recordings not only for the Atlantic but also the CTI labels are treasured - especially the present LP, which was produced by the 'Master of Sound' Creed Taylor. Now these crossover numbers from the worlds of classic, jazz, pop and easy listening are available once more. Discover, for example, Al Kooper's composition Fire And Rain (more familiar are the versions from Blood, Sweat & Tears and James Taylor), the famous theme music from the film Love Story, and three classical compositions by J. S. Bach and Mozart. All have been given a facelift and with such super sidemen ranging from Ron Carter to Bob James and a superb Freddie Waits on the drums, they are a real treat.
    So cast aside any preconceptions and enjoy this meticulous production and the clear reproduction on vinyl.



    Musicians:



    • Hubert Laws (flute)

    • Don Sebesky (arranger)

    • Fred Alston, Jr. (bassoon)

    • Bob James (electric piano)

    • Gene Bertoncini (guitar)

    • David Friedman (vibraphone)

    • Ron Carter (bass)

    • Airto, Richie 'Pablo' Landrum (percussion)

    • Fred Waits (drums)




    Recording: December 1970 at Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA

    Production: Creed Taylor





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Fire and Rain
    2. Allegro from Concerto No. 3 in D
    3. Theme from Love Story
    4. Passacaglia in C Minor
    5. Flute Sonata in F
    Hubert Laws
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Round About Midnight (Speakers Corner) Round About Midnight (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Round About Midnight (Speakers Corner)

    At long last these early recordings, which Miles Davis set down for the Columbia label in 1955 and 1956, are available on LP again. And what is more, they were made without any alternate takes or second attempts, as is the custom these days.



    You can sit back and enjoy the six numbers in the order which the producer, probably in conjunction with Davis, decided upon. To be sure, all of the titles are well known and have been played a thousand times over in many different versions. But what this Quintet (and here each and every individual musician is meant!) produces as regards inventiveness, thrilling improvisations and artistry is absolutely top notch. Davis's vibrato-less sound is taken over seamlessly by John Coltrane - wonderfully demonstrated in the middle of Bye, Bye Blackbird, while Paul Chambers' showpiece is Ack VÄrmeland du sköna (aka Dear Old Stockholm). In the years 1955/56, bebop was the talk of the day, born witness to by the classics Tadd's Delight by Tadd Dameron and Ah-Leu-Cha by Charlie Parker. Here, however, the improvised melodic strands are more moderate, pointing the way to the style that later became known as modal jazz.



    Although 'Round About Midnight as an album does not enjoy the reputation of Kind Of Blue, this Columbia recording contains many gems which are well worth hearing.



    Musicians:



    • Miles Davis

    • John Coltrane (tenor saxophone)

    • Red Garland (piano)

    • Paul Chambers (bass)

    • Philly Joe Jones (drums)




    Recording: October 1955, June and September 1956 at Columbia's 30th Street Studio, New York

    Production: George Avakian




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Round Midnight
    2. Ah-Leu-Cha
    3. All Of You
    4. Bye Bye Blackbird
    5. Tadds Delight

    6. Dear Old Stockholm
    Miles Davis
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mozart - Sinfonia Concertante (Speakers Corner) Mozart - Sinfonia Concertante (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Mozart - Sinfonia Concertante (Speakers Corner)

    "Now I am going to compose a Sinfonia concertante", wrote Mozart to his father, quite unsuspecting that his contribution to this hybrid of concerto and symphony would not bring the immediate approval and success to which he was accustomed. But opinions have changed drastically since then, especially since the Sinfonia concertante K. 364 has far greater depth to it than its title suggests. The wealth of melodic ideas, subtly allotted alternately to the soloist and the orchestra, testifies to the fact that this is one of Mozart's mature orchestral masterpieces which he composed while in Vienna.



    The superb performers in this DECCA recording guarantee that the listener will not only enjoy the deceptive merriment of the outer movements but will be deeply moved by the sad Andante. What bad luck for rival performances! But when father and son take up their bows, this is the recording to beat all recordings!



    On the B side, the Duo for Violin and Viola, K. 423 is a welcome bonus since it offers a wonderful opportunity for a display of virtuosity and counterpoint. And of course the old question pops up once again as to who is the better master of his instrument: father or son? The answer is simple: neither the one nor the other! - Both, of course!



    Musicians:



    • David and Igor Oistrakh

    • The Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra

    • Kyrill Kondrashin (conductor)




    Recording: September 1963 at DECCA Studio No. 3 in West Hampstead, London by Kenneth Wilkinson

    Production: Erik Smith und Ray Minshull





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Toto IV (Speakers Corner) Toto IV (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Toto IV (Speakers Corner)

    Anyone who gives the dull name "Four" to their rock album must either be very sure of success or already have resigned. The group Toto may well have experienced such extremes as there was an enormous cleft between their amazing financial success and the crushing negative opinions voiced by the critics. Billboard criticised the superficial lyrics as being void of any sort of emotional weight while the Los Angeles Times aimed their fire at the musicians themselves, slamming them as dubious artists with a commercialised mentality.



    To this Toto struck back with their fourth album, which was an unparalleled success and brought them six Grammy awards. For a whole ten months Africa reigned at Number 1 on the charts and together with the super-hit Rosanna the two smash hits were a constant presence, backed up by a collection of impressive rock classics. A trip to the record shop is all that is needed to prove that this is unlikely to change in the near future. The bright red cover with its depiction of a sword will catch your eye, as though saying: It's got to be the Fourth!



    Musicians:



    • Steve Porcaro, David Paich (keyboard, vocal)

    • Steve Lukather (guitar, vocal)

    • Bobby Kimball (vocal)

    • David Hungate (bass)

    • Jeff Porcaro (drums, percussion)





    Recording: 1982 at Sunset Sound, Los Angeles, by David Leonard, Peggy McCreary & Terry Christian and Record One, Los Angeles, by Jamie Ledner, Niko Bolas & Lon LeMaster

    Production: Toto




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Rosanna
    2. Make Believe
    3. I Won't Hold You Back
    4. Good For You
    5. It's a Feeling
    6. Afraid Of Love
    7. Lovers In The Night
    8. We Made It
    9. Waiting For Your Love
    10. Africa

    Toto
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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