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  • Mozart - Eine Kleine Nachtmusik (Speakers Corner) Mozart - Eine Kleine Nachtmusik (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Mozart - Eine Kleine Nachtmusik (Speakers Corner)

    Mozart wrote the Divertimento No. 1 at the age of six, while A Musical Joke and Eine kleine Nachtmusik were composed shortly before his death.



    From what one hears, apparently only a few music lovers enjoy listening to Eine kleine Nachtmusik. Far too often has it been performed routinely rather than being filled with life. This recording is quite different: living up to his reputation, Karl MÜnchinger proves that this favourite can be imbued with significance.



    The historical roote of the serenade lie in the suite which consists of varied contrasting dance movements. In the spirit of this tradition, MÜnchinger offers a clear and unfussed interpretation which is absolutely credible and has a freshness rarely heard. The ensemble plays both cheerfully and and wittily. In A Musical Joke, Mozart parodies amateurish composers of his own era, and the orchestra quite obviously participates in the fun.
    This LP is distinguished by its musical and tonal balance and is one of DECCA's best sound recordings.





    Musicians:



    • Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra

    • Karl MÜnchinger (conductor)




    Recording: November 1960, Victoria Hall at Geneva by Roy Wallace

    Production: James Walker





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner) The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $95.99
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    x

    The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner)

    The attempts that have been made to describe Glenn Gould's complex personality are endless in number, as are his surprising and often eccentric interpretations. Whether he is considered to be a sensitive maniac, neurotic individualist or uncompromising genius - Gould polarises, provokes and fascinates us long after his death in 1982. As early as 1964 the Canadian pianist ceased to give concerts, since he found appearing before an audience completely unacceptable and preferred to concentrate on studio recordings.



    Way in front of composers of the Viennese Classical era, which he did not take particularly seriously - although his performances keenly reflect Beethoven's rhythmicity - comes his personal deity: Bach. Gould's notorious strictness gives form to the minutest of figure in the score. He weaves his way through Bach's music and thereby articulates its tightly knit and multi-facetted depths. No lecturing keyboard proponent this, but a creative co-composer who imbues the spirit of the music with life and sonority. Upon the release in 1980 of the 80th Birthday Edition with its wealth of visual and tonal material, the music journalist Werner Theurich wrote that »no one had ever played more raptly, or more intensively. That Gould's performances are nothing but heavenly can be seen and felt. The rest is pure music.«




    Recording: April 1957, May 1967 and February 1969 at Columbia 30th Street Studio, New York City, by Fred Plaut

    Production: Andrew Kazdin




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    The Bach Keyboard Concertos J. S. Bach: Keyboard Concertos Nos. 1-5 and 7
    L. v. Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 1 - Glenn Gould, the Columbia Symphony Orchestra conducted by Vladimir Golschmann and Leonard Bernstein
    Glenn Gould
    $95.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Box Set - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Pink Panther (Speakers Corner) The Pink Panther (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    The Pink Panther (Speakers Corner)

    The film director Blake Edwards brought into existence what is probably the best opening sequence to his comic crime film when he commissioned a young enterprising company to produce an animated Pink Panther cartoon film. The creative team came up with the idea of giving the cold, glittering diamond the guise of a cool, pink panther, which leads a bungling detective on a merry dance to the slinky sound of the Panther theme.



    Mancini would not be Mancini if he did not bathe the film location - the skiing resort Cortina d'Ampezzo -in highly varied musical colours and genres. His well-known love for dance music finds itself in the samba (It Had Better Be Tonight), the shuffle (Champagne And Quail), and the cha-cha (Something For Sellers). But also the ballad, sung by a muted trumpet and saxophone (Royal Blue), or the simple combination of keyboard and strings (Piano And Strings) are all woven into the story. One of the most memorable and delightful sounds is that of the accordion, whose melodies evoke an atmosphere that is filled with the Bohème, Paris and the sound of the musette. This music is never gaudy, but subtle, just like a panther padding quietly along. And if your appetite is now whetted for more, there is an extra portion of Mancini to be found in Breakfast At Tiffany's (RCA LSP 2362).



    Musicians:



    • Henry Mancini (arranger, conductor, p) & orchestra



    Recording: September 1963 at RCA Victor's Music Center of the World, Hollywood, by Jim Malloy

    Production: Joe Reisman



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. The Pink Panther Theme
    2. It Had Better Be Tonight (Instrumental)
    3. Royal Blue
    4. Champagne and Quail
    5. The Village Inn
    6. The Tiber Twist
    7. It Had Better Be Tonight
    8. Cortina
    9. The Lonely Princess
    10. Something for Sellers
    11. Piano and Strings
    12. Shades of Sennett
    Henry Mancini
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Call Me (Speakers Corner) Call Me (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Call Me (Speakers Corner)

    What connects celebrity chefs and pop stars is their fine nose for ingredients, especially when hot and spicy ones are mixed with milder elements to create an aromatic result. A combination of 'sweet' and 'funky' is the secret of Al Green's gloriously sentimental and sensual pop songs, which in the sexually free Seventies were often referred to as »songs to make love by«. What swings along gently is, however, Al Green's subtly controlled falsetto, which he can tone right to the threshold of audibility. But watch out! This music belts out some fiery sounds right from the very first number. The sinuous, swinging request in the brilliant hit single Call Me, the relaxed and groovy Stand Up, with its sharp wind interjections which demand one's unerring attention, are typical for Green's style, just as is his almost disturbing capability to gain comfort from loneliness (I'm So Lonesome, I Could Cry). This rhythmically powered music can best be described as light, intensive, dynamic but never flashy (Your Love Is Like The Morning Sun). It finds its earthly culmination in soul (I'm Waiting) and spiritual depth.



    Musicians:



    • Al Green (vocal)

    • James Mitchell (bassoon, arranger)

    • Andrew Love (tenor sax)

    • Jack Hale (trombone)

    • Wayne Jackson (trumpet)

    • Mabon Hodges (guitar)

    • Charles Hodges (keyboards)

    • Archie Turner (piano)

    • Leroy Hodges (bass)

    • Howard Grimes (drums)

    • The Memphis Strings



    Recording: 1973 at Royal Recording Studios, Memphis, TN, by Willie Mitchell

    Production: Al Green and Willie Mitchell




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Call Me (Come Back Home)
    2. Have You Been Making out O.K.
    3. Stand Up
    4. I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry
    5. Your Love Is Like the Morning Sun
    6. Here I Am (Come and Take Me)
    7. Funny How Time Slips Away
    8. You Ought to Be with Me
    9. Jesus Is Waiting
    Al Green
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Holst: The Planets (Speakers Corner) Holst: The Planets (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Holst: The Planets (Speakers Corner)

    Earth was not created in a day. And the same applies to Gustav Holst's interplanetary symphony which took him about three years to write. The composer employs a massive orchestra and rich orchestral colouring to portray each planet in his musical psychogram.



    Mars, the Bringer of War, rages with mechanical brutality, while Venus brings peace and an acceptance of life. Mercury, the Winged Messenger, darts here and there with quicksilver speed, while powerful and sovereign Jupiter brings jollity and reassurance. Saturn plods by with heavy tread, while Uranus with its contrasting changes in tempo remains enigmatic and extrovert. And because Pluto, the most distant planet had not yet been discovered, it is Neptune, the great unknown, which is lost in time and space in an endless ostinato of female voices.
    Zubin Mehta and the Los Angeles Philharmonic present this astronomical journey with precision and exhilaration, leaving neither time nor space for astrological speculation. As always, the excellent DECCA recording quality guarantees an unimpeded view of this musical galaxy.



    Recording: April 1971 at Royce Hall, Los Angeles by James Lock and Colin Moorfoot

    Production: John Mordler




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Holst: The Planets
    Zubin Mehta
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bashin' (Speakers Corner) Bashin' (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bashin' (Speakers Corner)

    Right up until today rumour has it that Creed Taylor enticed the organist Jimmy Smith to leave Blue Note and change to the Verve label by means of a very large fistful of dollars. One things is clear, however: that Jimmy Smith never revealed a single word about this delicate matter; but it is also clear that the whole concept of his music took on new dimensions when he changed over to his new backer. Recordings with Wes Montgomery were just the beginning; large ensembles, superb arrangements by Oliver Nelson, and fine contributions by his soloists created a magnificent background for the 'new' Jimmy Smith on this and subsequent LPs.



    Despite its title, Bashin', there is absolutely nothing to criticise on this LP. The A side presents the new concept: a wonderful, swinging background against which Jimmy Smith can develop his full potential. Oliver Nelson's light and airy arrangements further enhance the standard themes: soloists are never confined within set limits but are gently guided; the riffs are presently precisely and cleanly, without ever sounding overloaded.



    The use of the organ is also quite fascinating: beautifully relaxed in Beggar For The Blues which is arranged for a trio; swinging in the title number Bashin', and cheerful in the style of an old cowboy song - I'm An Old Cowhand, whereby this version has no need to stand in the shadow of Sonny Rollins's almost classical version.



    The old Hammond B3 organ has experienced a revival over the past few years. Jimmy Smith, on the other hand, can look back on a great musical and commercial success story ever since the Fifties - as with Bashin'!



    Musicians:



    • Jimmy Smith (organ)

    • Phil Woods (saxophone)

    • Ernie Royal, Doc Severinsen (trumpet)

    • Jimmy Cleveland, Urbie Green (trombone)

    • Barry Galbraith (guitar)

    • George Duvivier (bass)

    • Ed Shaughnessy, Don Bailey (drums)




    Recording: March 1962 in New York by Rudy Van Gelder

    Production: Creed Taylor





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Walk on the Wild Side

    2. Ol' Man River

    3. In A Mellow Tone

    4. Step Right Up
    5. Beggar for the Blues
    6. Bashin'
    7. I'm an Old Cow Hand (From the Rio Grande)
    Jimmy Smith
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Stitt Plays Bird (Speakers Corner) Stitt Plays Bird (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Stitt Plays Bird (Speakers Corner)

    It is widely known that Sonny Stitt didn't want to be taken for Charlie 'Bird' Parker and changed from playing the alto to the tenor saxophone. Although false rumours pop up every now and then, the truth is that at the beginning of the 1940s Stitt independently developed the same be-bop licks as Parker without ever having heard him.
    For Stitt Plays Bird Sonny had to unearth his old instrument and insert a new mouthpiece because Atlantic Records and their entrepreneurial president Ahmet Ertegun hoped for big sales figures. Which actually proved true.


    One half of the modern jazz quartet provided the melodic and rhythmic basis for improvisations on eight 'hits' by Charlie Parker and one composition by his first employer Jay McShann. Added to this are the subtle, sensitive scatterings from Jim Hall and the emphatic beat from Richard Davis, both of which lend delicacy and pulse to the numbers. It's hard to recommend a special track, but Scrapple From The Apple is just awesome! All the numbers are based on standards - just which they are can be found in the informative liner notes by the be-bop expert Ira Gitler. Atlantic's logo "Full Dynamic Frequency Spectrum" is no longer a swindle in this new pressing and at last one can enjoy all nine titles in all their sonic glory.


    This Speakers Corner LP was remastered using pure analogue components only, from the master tapes through to the cutting head. All royalties and mechanical rights have been paid.

    Musicians:



    • Sonny Stitt (alto saxophone)
    • John Lewis (piano)
    • Jim Hall (guitar)
    • Richard Davis (bass)
    • Connie Kay (drums)



    Recording: January 1963 at Atlantic Studios, New York City, by Tom Dowd

    Production: Nesuhi Ertegun




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Ornithology
    2. Scrapple From The Apple
    3. My Little Suede Shoes
    4. Parker's Mood
    5. Au Privave
    6. Ko-Ko
    7. Confirmation
    8. Hootie Blues
    9. Constellation
    Sonny Stitt
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Midnight Special (Speakers Corner) The Midnight Special (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Midnight Special (Speakers Corner)

    No attempt has ever been made to compare Harry Belafonte with other singers of his own generation or generations following. Perhaps this is because there simply is no other singer in the American folk scene who possesses anything remotely comparable to his uniquely silky yet dusky voice, or his genial mix of calypso, blues, gospel and traditional songs. The present album provides a wonderful testimony to the Jamaican singer's flexibility and multifariousness, which he learned to perfection of New York's jazz clubs. It includes songs such as "Midnight Special", a prisoner's nocturnal prayer for freedom, and "On Top Of Old Smokey", which Belafonte instils with intricate rhythm and Caribbean flair. And the tailor-made arrangements are no less thrilling: whether possessing all the drive of a stomping big band, filled with the intimacy of a smoochy small ensemble (with Bob Dylan on the mouth organ!) or with an earthy, folksy, blue grass sound - there's all that and plenty more! To put it in a nutshell: a veritable feast of traditional music which doesn't sound the least 'traditional'.



    Musicians:



    • Harry Belafonte (vocal)

    • Jimmy Jones (conductor, arranger)

    • Bob Dylan (harmonica)

    • Joe Wilder (trumpet)

    • Jerome Richardson (saxophone)

    • Millard Thomas, Ernie Calabria (guitar)

    • Norman Keenan (bass)

    • Don Lamond, Percy Brice (drums)




    Recording: 1962 by Bob Simpson

    Production: Hugo Montenegro





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. The Midnight Special
    2. Crawdad Song
    3. Memphis Tennessee
    4. Gotta Travel On
    5. Did You Hear About Jerry?
    6. On Top Of Old Smokey
    7. Muleskinner
    8. Makes A Long Time Man Feel Bad
    9. Michael Row The Boat Ashore
    Harry Belafonte
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Nina Simone and Piano! (Speakers Corner) Nina Simone and Piano! (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Nina Simone and Piano! (Speakers Corner)

    Musicians certainly don't have it easy with record companies. First of all they must struggle to even get a contract. Then, when their debut release has proved a success, they are bandied around from one arranger to another in all the recording studios imaginable. But having been treated with such sounds as a snappy combo, meaty bigband, and smoochy string orchestra, there at last comes an opportunity for some artists to be themselves again.



    This album wholly concentrates on Nina Simone and demonstrates that she does not need help from anyone else in order to bring her strikingly expressive voice into the limelight. Accompanying her in her songs about loneliness, identity crises, and desires is her faithful friend, the piano, which she masters equally as well as her voice. The piano parts are far more than just casual accompaniments. Varying from number to number, they range from a classical, bluesy sound, to late-Romantic fervour, right up to avantgarde aggression. And yet all these pieces have something in common: filled with bizarre beauty, they portray a complex personality with all its ups and downs.



    Musicians:



    • Nina Simone (piano, vocals)




    Recording: 1969 in RCA Victor's Studio B, New York City, by Ray Hall

    Production: Stroud Productions, Inc.




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Seems I'm Never Tired Lovin' You
    2. Nobody's Fault But Mine
    3. I Think It's Going To Rain Today
    4. Everyone's Gone To The Moon
    5. Compensation
    6. Who Am I
    7. Another Spring
    8. The Human Touch
    9. I Get Along Without You Very Well (Except Sometimes)

    10. The Desperate Ones
    Nina Simone
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Caravanserai (Speakers Corner) Caravanserai (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Caravanserai (Speakers Corner)

    To attempt to categorise Carlos Santana's music is, for the prophets of rock music, rather like dancing on the edge of a volcano. While the New York Times acclaimed the band as a reincarnation of Dizzy Gillespie's Cuban-jazz bigband from the end of the Forties, the specialist magazine Rolling Stone spoke of a »methadrine trip without visions«. Organ-player Gregg Rolie offered a very simple explanation of the origins of the highly differentiated sound colouring and the throb and chirp of the Afro-Cuban polyrhythms: he succinctly remarked that each member of the multi-cultural band just played the music which he had grown up with.



    Just how thrilling this sounds is already evident from the first number on the disc, with its sounds of nature, twisted rhythms, and little snatches of melody, which - as in several other titles - remains spellbinding even without the fascinating drive of Santana's lead-sound. Of course there is plenty of solo material on the guitar which manifests itself in exuberant improvisations with a fusion of rock, salsa and jazz elements. When listening to this well-oiled rhythm machine, one quite rightly gets the impression that this unique band has stretched itself to its limits, and it is not by mere coincidence that they split up shortly afterwards. What has remained is one of the most powerful Santana records ever made.



    Musicians:



    • Carlos Santana (guitar, percussion)

    • Hadley Caliman (saxophone)

    • Gregg Rolie (organ, piano)

    • Wendy Haas (piano)

    • Tom Coster (electric piano)

    • Neal Schon (guitar)

    • Douglas Rauch (guitar, bass)

    • Tom Rutley (bass)

    • Mike Shrieve (drums)

    • Jose Chepito Areas, Armando Peraza (percussion)



    Recording: February and May 1972

    Production: Carlos Santana and Michael Shrieve



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Eternal Caravan Of Reincarnation
    2. Waves Within
    3. Look Up (To See What's Coming Down)
    4. Just In Time To See The Sun
    5. Song Of The Wind
    6. All The Love Of The Universe
    7. Future Primitive
    8. Stone Flower
    9. La Fuente Del Ritmo
    10. Every Step Of The Way


    Santana
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • From Elvis in Memphis (Speakers Corner) From Elvis in Memphis (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    From Elvis in Memphis (Speakers Corner)

    Ranked 190/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

    A record by Elvis, produced in Tennessee. What's so special about that? Surely everyone knows that the lorry driver from the Southern State sobbed his early songs into the local radio microphones. But Elvis in Memphis is far more than just one of around 40 albums which the King of Rock' n' Roll produced during the course of 35 years. »This marks what is probably the most impressive comeback in the entire history of pop music«, enthused the normally reticent New York Times.



    What had happened? In 1969, after a 14-year meteoric career in show business and movies, and an exemplary PR campaign, Elvis returned to his hometown to record these songs which, in their style, are reminiscent of those recorded in the Fifties for Sun Records. Alongside the lavishly mixed pop and blues numbers (Power Of My Love) and country sound (I'm Movin' On), there is also one of the greatest chart-busters and heart-breakers of a whole generation: In The Ghetto.



    There is certainly no room for discussion about the value of this collectors' item - the astronomical price for a good secondhand copy speaks for itself!



    Musicians:



    • Elvis Presley (vocal, guitar, piano)

    • Ronnie Milsap (piano)

    • Bobby Emmons (organ)

    • Reggie Young (guitar, electric-guitar)

    • Tommy Cogbill, Mike Leech (bass)

    • Gene Chrisman (drums)

    • The Memphis Horns and background vocals




    Recording: 1969 by Al Pachucki

    Production: Felton Jarvis and Chips Moman





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Wearin' that Loved Look
    2. Only the Strong Survive
    3. I'll Hold You in My Heart
    4. Long Black Limousine
    5. It Keeps Right On A-Hurtin'
    6. I'm Movin On
    7. Power of My Love
    8. Gentle on My Mind
    9. After Loving You
    10. True Love Travels on a Gravel Road
    11. Any Day Now
    12. In the Ghetto
    Elvis Presley
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Carmen Suite - Ansermet (Speakers Corner) Carmen Suite - Ansermet (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Carmen Suite - Ansermet (Speakers Corner)

    The 19th-century suites with their collection of favourite songs and instrumental excerpts from operas are the clear forerunners of today's 'Best-Of' culture. The Carmen Suite was assembled after Bizet's death and brought the operatic masterpiece into the concert hall. The overture is fresh and rousing, the toreador theme marches in proudly and purposefully, followed by the destiny motif in the minor key which burns itself into ones ear and mind. With every bar it becomes obvious that this suite is not so much a series of excerpts but rather the true substance of its creator's musical ideas.



    All that remained of the five-act play L'ArlÉsienne after its unsuccessful premiere was Bizet's incidental music, which he himself orchestrated lavishly and premiered with success. Similar to Carmen, popular melodies are treated with the composer's own unique style to make them ageless, and Ernest Ansermet and his orchestra stages them delightfully for all eternity.



    Recording: April and May 1958 at Victoria Hall, Geneva (Switzerland), by Roy Wallace

    Production: James Walker



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Carmen Suite
    2. L'Arlesienne Suite
    Georges Bizet
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mister Guitar (Speakers Corner) Mister Guitar (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Mister Guitar (Speakers Corner)

    At a time when rock 'n' roll-crazy teenagers in the USA and elsewhere were dancing their feet off to the beat of Elvis Presley and Bill Haley, probably no one was interested as to where this music actually originated. The focal point of the folk movement was Tennessee: it was here that everyone came who had used their grandfathers' songs and fiddle tunes to create the pop-oriented Nashville Sound, a sound which became American music's trademark and export hit.



    Chet Atkins is one of the people who helped to create this special sound and who kept an Argus-eyed watch on its originality and development. In addition to the recordings he made in his own studio, he was also a producer and studio guitarist for RCA.



    This album features Chet Atkins as "Mister Guitar", who - as a soloist - only allowed a small and highly discreet rhythm group to accompany him. The result is a refreshingly pure and unadulterated steel-string sound without frills and padding and so has little in common with the commercial country music of the masses. With his relaxed, technically perfect and highly variable playing technique, Atkins shows us what the New World has to offer in the way of folk music: highly melodic numbers which delight the ear with the simplest of means.





    Musicians:



    • Chet Atkins (guitar) and band




    Recording: 1959 in Nashville, Tennessee, by Bob Farris and Bill Porter

    Production: Chet Atkins




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. I Know That You Know
    2. Rainbow
    3. Hello Bluebird
    4. Siesta
    5. Country Style
    6. Show Me The Way Go Home
    7. Im Forever Blowing Bubbles
    8. Backwoods
    9. Country Gentleman
    10. Slinkey
    11. Jessie
    12. Concerto In C Minor
    Chet Atkins
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • It's Monk's Time (Speakers Corner) It's Monk's Time (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    It's Monk's Time (Speakers Corner)

    With its three compositions by Thelonious Monk, one might call this LP from 1964 "3 Standards and 3 Monks". The 'High Priest' of bebop had reached a further pinnacle in his career and performed with his fantastic, skilful and well-rehearsed quartet at numerous festivals and concerts. As if in a dream, the musicians penetrate the apparently simple yet rhythmically complicated themes, interrupted again and again by Monk's solo escapades on the piano. On the stage, Monk often stood up and jigged around the piano like a lumbering dancing bear, with one of his distinctive hats on his head; he plonks down on the piano stool after the Charlie Rouse solo; his enormous feet tap back and forth to the beat; he constantly fiddles with the ring on his finger; and he creates the most wonderful improvisations ever heard with his 'false' fingering.


    Calling all jazz fans: Listen to Thelonious Monk, and you will have a ball - most especially if you put this super disc with the promising title "It's Monks Time" on your turntable!



    Musicians:



    • Thelonious Monk (piano)

    • Charlie Rouse (tenor saxophone)

    • Butch Warren (bass)

    • Ben Riley (drums)

    • Teo Macero (producer)


    Recording: January - March 1964

    Production: Teo Macero



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Lulu's Back In Town
    2. Memories Of You
    3. Stuffy Turkey
    4. Brake's Sake
    5. Nice Work If You Can Get It
    6. Shuffle Soil
    Thelonious Monk
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Elvis Is Back! (Speakers Corner) Elvis Is Back! (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Elvis Is Back! (Speakers Corner)

    During the King's artistically unproductive period of military service, no costs or efforts were spared (e.g. A Date With Elvis, RCA LPM-2011), and no consolatory promises of things to come were left unsaid by the management in order to keep Elvis alive and well in the minds of his vast circle of fans. At last the great coup was landed: Elvis Is Back was what everyone was waiting to hear and American radio and television broadcasting stations made a gigantic medial feast of it.



    With the ink scarcely dry on his demobilization papers, Elvis entered the studio in March 1960 and recorded a whole series of numbers which later became worldwide hits, such as Are You Lonesome Tonight and It's Now Or Never. Released as singles, these tender ballads created a sensation, while the LP with numbers such as Dirty, Dirty Feeling, Like A Baby and The Thrill Of Your Love underlined Elvis's enhanced qualities as a rock, blues and gospel singer. That his voice - despite everyone's fears - had lost nothing of its erotic thrill is more than amply demonstrated in his rendering of Fever alone, which is accompanied merely by bass and percussion.



    With its amazing array of varying styles, this must surely be one of Elvis's most genial albums and was unrivaled right up until his great comeback in 1968 (From Elvis In Memphis, RCA LSP-4155).





    Musicians:



    • Elvis Presley (guitar, vocal)

    • Floyd Cramer(piano)

    • Scotty Moore (guitar)

    • Boots Randolph (saxophone)

    • Hank Garland (bass, guitar)

    • Charlie Hodge (harmony)

    • Bob Moore (bass)

    • D.J. Fontana (drums)

    • Hoyt Hawkins, Neal Matthews, Gordon Stoker, Ray C. Walker (vocal)




    March 1960 at RCA Studios, Hollywood, CA. and April 1960 in Nashville, TS., USA,
    by Bill Porter

    Production: Chet Atkins





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Make Me Know
    2. Fever
    3. The Girl of My Best Friend
    4. I Will Be Home Again
    5. Dirty, Dirty Feeling
    6. The Thrill of Your Love
    7. Soldier Boy
    8. Such a Night
    9. It Feels So Right
    10. The Girl Next Door
    11. Like a Baby

    12. Reconsider Baby
    Elvis Presley
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Right Now (Speakers Corner) Right Now (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Right Now (Speakers Corner)

    A great deal has been said about Blues and Rock'n'Roll musicians being inspired to great things by folk music. But one hears little about those who work quietly in the background, far removed from dazzling light shows, power amps and fog machines, and who create new strains of tender plants from the roots of traditional folk, so to speak. One such person is Wizz Jones from south England. He can write songs, and he can sing - but it would be far too simple to describe him as a songwriter. His cultivated and versatile performance technique on the guitar bears witness to his personal aspiration for perfection on his instrument. With Jones all this culminates in highly original high-end folk: he's particularly laid-back in groovy numbers (Right Now, No More Time To Try), where the elastic and springy sound of the guitar is enhanced with chirping sitar and wavering bottleneck slides so typical of the times. Alongside these are the carefully re-worked traditional melodies (American Land), a 17th-century tune (Raven) where the singer plays 'call-and-response' with himself, and a solid 16-bar blues (Deep Water) in the early Chicago style. Particular attention should be paid to the numbers in which he collaborates with Alan Tunbridge and is fired by his genial ideas - specially recommended: Mary Go 'Round.



    Musicians:



    • Wizz Jones (vocals, guitar)

    • Sandy Jones (banjo)

    • Pete Berryman (guitar)

    • Reanna Sutcliffe (piano, harpischord, vocals)

    • John Renbourn (sitar, harmonica)

    • Andy Fernbach (piano)

    • Sue Draheim (vocals)

    • Malcolm Pool (bass)

    • Ian Hoyle (drums)




    Recording: 1972 by Colin Caldwell at Marquee Studios, London

    Production: John Renbourn




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Which of Them You Love the Best
    2. One Grain of Sand
    3. City of the Angels
    4. The Raven
    5. Right Now
    6. Find a Man for You Girl
    7. American Land
    8. No More Time to Try
    9. Mary Go 'Round
    10. Deep Water
    Wizz Jones
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Imported Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner) The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner)

    After the break-up of John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in the summer of 1967, the time seemed ripe for Peter Green, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood to take their leave from raw British rock 'n' roll. The newly established band Fleetwood Mac first turned to black blues, and their art of playing was so similar to that of other groups that the magazine Eye criticised them for their »almost ridiculous mimicry«. However, their choice of performance style took them in the right direction and in 1969, the year in which The Pious Bird Of Good Omen appeared, they landed at the top end of the pop charts, even ahead of The Beatles and Stevie Wonder.



    Of course, in the cover version of Little Willie John's Need Your Love So Bad, which is treated with a velvety string sound, and other bluesy songs, the American influence still makes itself heard, but not without success! The highly individual sound of the group comes best through in the now legendary numbers such as the weightless, gliding Albatross and Black Magic Woman with its Latin and blues elements. Judged the best British blues ever to be played (allmusic.com), one can now sit back and enjoy this great album.



    Musicians:



    • Peter Green (guitar, vocal)

    • Jeremy Spencer (guitar, piano, vocal)

    • Danny Kirwan (guitar)

    • Eddie Boyd (piano, vocal)

    • Big Walter Horton (harmonica)

    • John McVie (bass)

    • Mick Fleetwood (drums)




    Recorded between September 1967 and October 1968 by Mike Ross

    Production: Mike Vernon





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Need Your Love So Bad
    2. Comin' Home
    3. Rambling Pony
    4. The Big Boat
    5. I Believe My Time Ain't Long
    6. The Sun Is Shining
    7. Albatross
    8. Black Magic Woman
    9. Just The Blues
    10. Jigsaw Puzzle Blues
    11. Looking For Somebody
    12. Stop Messin' Round

    Fleetwood Mac
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Scriabin & Prokofiev: Piano Sonatas (Speakers Corner) Scriabin & Prokofiev: Piano Sonatas (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Scriabin & Prokofiev: Piano Sonatas (Speakers Corner)

    Glenn Gould's highly self-willed art of piano playing has not only contributed to the building of a myth around his artistic personality, but also placed several works from the vast piano repertoire under the magnifying glass (as it were) in musical life. One such work is Scriabin's Piano Sonata No. 3 whose psychological, cyclical programme is held together by the theme, which recurs throughout the four movements. Unlike many other recordings, in Gould's hands the piece takes on a pleasantly non-romantic pathos. Gould subdivides the various states of mind through many breathing spaces and softens the tone to pianissimo, thus forcing the listener to hold his breath and concentrate wholly upon the finely woven counterpoint.



    In contrast, Prokofiev's Piano Sonata in B flat major is overwhelmingly raging with its hammering staccatos, yet not omitting to add a bold, and at times derisive character. The slow second movement is at times bell-like, and filled with a great radiance and a fine sparkle. It is followed by a final movement, which lasts several minutes and has a steely, aggressive nature. As incomparable as the works are in their structure, they both explore the mental extremes of human emotions.



    Recording: July 1967 / January, February and June 1968 at Columbia 30th Street Studio by Fred Plaut

    Production: Andrew Kazdin




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    Alexander Scriabin: Piano Sonata No. 3 in F sharp minor, Op. 23
    Serge Prokofiev: Piano Sonata No. 7 in B flat major, Op. 83 - Glenn Gould
    Glenn Gould
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Stravinsky - Petruchka (Speakers Corner) Stravinsky - Petruchka (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Stravinsky - Petruchka (Speakers Corner)

    Petrushka was born of Stravinsky's vision of a long-haired musician hammering indiscriminately at the piano keys and engaging in a furious contest with the orchestra which »answers with vehement protests and acoustic fisticuffs«. As was the case with The Rite of Spring and The Firebird, Sergei Diaghilev and his Russian ballet had their share in ensuring that the 'burlesque' in four scenes would be suitable for the stage.
    The clown-doll Petrushka revels in his spiteful teasing and pranks at the Shrovetide fair.


    The orchestra contributes swirling dance figures, blaring brass and scurrying strings to his high-spirited clownery - but then the Moor enters and dances with the Ballerina, arousing jealousy in Petrushka. Although the clown-doll does not survive this bitter-sweet story, he triumphs at the end, his ghost mocking the crowd at the fair.
    This highly inventive music combines folksong, popular music and the waltz, all bound together by exhilating rhythms which are often taken to thunderous extremes. With its outstanding sound, this recording is a must-have in any Stravinsky collection.


    Recording: May 1959 at the Northrop Memorial Auditorium, Minnesota, USA, by C.R. Fine
    Production: Wilma Cozart-Fine and Clair Van Ausdall


    Musicians:



    • Antal Dorati (conductor)

    • Igor Stravinsky (composer)

    • The Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Petrouchka - Burlesque Scenes In Four Tableaux - The Shrovetide Fair; Russian Dance
    2. Petrouchka - Burlesque Scenes In Four Tableaux - In Petrouchka's Room
    3. Petrouchka - Burlesque Scenes In Four Tableaux - In The Moor's Room; Dance Of The Ballerina And The Moor
    4. Petrouchka - Burlesque Scenes In Four Tableaux - Grand Carnival - Dance Of Gypsies, Coachmen And Grooms; The Maskers; Death Of Petrouchka
    Stravinsky
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Sound Of Wilson Pickett (Speakers Corner) The Sound Of Wilson Pickett (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Sound Of Wilson Pickett (Speakers Corner)

    Wilson Pickett's best years were those when he recorded for Atlantic Records, and he remained convinced of this even after changing to other labels in his later career. Atlantic boss Jerry Wexler took the promising young Gospel singer under his wing and launched him on his rapidly developing career as an unruly soul man. Pickett's aggressiveness, which in his mature years occasionally resulted in him having backstage fights with musicians and managers, are expressed here in strong words and are given further bite by his antagonistic band. Although he lashed out to the full in his emotional, crackling vocal attacks, he never lost control and even his strongest outbursts remained highly musical. His unique, breathless sound and his ferocious efforts to express himself succinctly do not make for easy listening on this superb hit record and for white people, who according to Pickett would never understand soul music anyway, could well present a real challenge. Is this such fascinating music that you become dumbstruck? Very possibly, as critic Joachim von Mengershausen writes: »His voice is hard, aggressive and strained; it hardly binds the tones together, chops up the phrases, blurts out the essentials - Pickett has eliminated all the Uncle-Tom warmth in soul and has virtually rocked it away.«

    Musicians:



    • Wilson Pickett (vocal)

    • Spooner Oldham (piano, organ)

    • Andrew Love (tenor saxophone)

    • Floyd Newman (bassoon)

    • Gene Miller, Wayne Jackson (trumpet)

    • Jimmy R. Johnson, Chips Moman (guitar)

    • Junior Lowe (bass)

    • Roger Hawkins (drums)





    Recording: 1967 at Fame Recording Studios, Muscle Shoals (Alabama, USA), by Rick Hall & Tom Dowd

    Production: Jerry Wexler





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Soul Dance Number Three

    2. Funky Broadway
    3. I Need A Lot Of Loving Every Day
    4. I Found A Love, Part 1
    5. I Found A Love, Part 2
    6. You Can't Stand Alone
    7. Mojo Mamma
    8. I Found The One
    9. Something Within Me
    10. I'm Sorry About That
    11. Love Is A Beautiful Thing
    Wilson Pickett
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Straight From The Heart (Speakers Corner) Straight From The Heart (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Straight From The Heart (Speakers Corner)

    Ann Peebles' climb up the career ladder was rather more conventional than spectacular in the tough, rough days of rhythm and blues. She was first discovered when she appeared in Memphis nightclubs, was given a break by the big-band leader Gene 'Bowlegs' Miller, and landed her first top hit with the celebrated song I Can't Stand The Rain.



    Towards the end of the Seventies she made a well-timed retreat just before the outbreak of the highly commercialised disco wave, only to return many years later with a revival of her old songs.
    Her album from 1972 has certainly not mellowed with age. Her singing is sharp and soulful, and comes right from the heart (Slipped, Tripped And Fell In Love). The beat is powerful, throbbing, young and fresh (What You Laid On Me) or surging and groovy (How Strong Is A Woman?). The arrangements come across as sophisticated and well balanced, yet do not baulk at harsh attacks from the winds nor from the use of Hammond and Hohner keyboards, which were so popular at that time. Melody, singers and big band are airy and finely interwoven (Somebody's On Your Case), while a fusion of soft swing and snappy acerbity (I Pity The Fool) rounds off this album which is filled with pure emotion, heart and soul.



    Musicians:



    • Ann Peebles (vocal)

    • James Mitchell (bassoon)

    • Jack Hale (trombone)

    • Andrew Love, Ed Logan (tenor saxophone, vocals)

    • Charles Hodges (organ, piano)

    • Wayne Jackson (trumpet)

    • Teenie Hodges (guitar)

    • Leroy Hodges (bass)

    • Howard Grimes (drums)



    Recording: August 1971 at Royal Recording Studios, Memphis, TN, by Willie Mitchell

    Production: Willie Mitchell





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Slipped, Tripped and Fell In Love
    2. Trouble, Heartaches & Sadness
    3. What You Laid On Me
    4. How Strong Is A Woman
    5. Somebody's On Your Case
    6. I Feel Like Breaking Up Somebody's Home Tonight
    7. I've Been There Before
    8. I Pity The Fool
    9. 99 Pounds
    10. I Take What I Want
    Ann Peebles
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Deodato 2 (Speakers Corner) Deodato 2 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Deodato 2 (Speakers Corner)

    In his early years, Deodato, 'the gift of God', cultivated a highly original art of give and take in his music. His score for Stanley Kubrick's science fiction film A Space Odyssey 2001 - a funky, jazzed-up adaptation of Richard Strauss's bombastic orchestral work Also sprach Zarathustra - opened the ears of innumerable cinema-goers to classical music. On the present album Deodato again rocks and grooves with works from past eras: Gershwin's Rhapsody In Blue is reworked rhythmically and enriched, while Ravel's Pavane unfolds hesitatingly over a velvety carpet of sound. And why not win new fans for major musical works? Deodato, the master, and his complex musical apparatus impart a true Latin feeling to these covered works.


    The 'new' classic Nights In White Satin too, one of the most congenial gigantic hits from the 60s, is staged by Deodato as a miniature slow rock drama just as perfectly as he cultivates his own very pure funky style (Super Strut). In Deodato's arrangements, the powerful instrumental forces open out almost effortlessly and evolve into a gentle flow of sheer pleasure. Everything appears to be simple, although nothing is simple! And therein lies the uniqueness of 'the gift of God'.



    Musicians:



    • Eumir Deodato (keyboards)

    • Jon Faddis (trumpet, fluegel horn)

    • Wayne Andre (trombone)

    • Joe Temperley (bassoon)

    • Hubert Laws (flute)

    • John Tropea (guitar)

    • Stanley Clarke (bass)

    • Billy Cobham (drums)





    Recording: April and May 1973 at Van Gelder Studios, Englewood Cliffs, NJ (USA), by Rudy Van Gelder

    Production: Creed Taylor





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Nights In White Satin
    2. Pavane For A Dead Princess
    3. Skyscrapers
    4. Super Strut
    5. Rhapsody In Blue

    Deodato
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique (Speakers Corner) Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique (Speakers Corner)

    Beethoven had just finished writing his symphonies when - in 1830 - a young Frenchman created a sensation with his completely novel and exuberant orchestral music. Based on classical music form, Berlioz composed his »massive instrumental composition« as a five-movement musical drama. Such a stroke of genius, in which the ego and grief thereof are described, had never been heard before in the French Romantic period.


    Berlioz employs a very large orchestra with a big timpani section, four bassoons and military brass to present the young artist - an autobiographically motivated character - who dreams his way through the various episodes, hallucinating and frenzied. Here it is clear that it is Berlioz' declared intention to express the artist's visions radically and unmistakably in music - beginning with the ever-recurring delusional 'idÉe fixe' via a terrifying opium intoxication and ending up with the nightmare of his own burial.


    Of the many high-quality, often highly impassioned performances, this particular one by Dimitri Mitropoulos is certainly a benchmark recording. The great conductor makes the rhythms pulsate; he skilfully mixes the wealth of sound colouring, and blends the orchestral instruments so subtly that one notices previously unheard details with every listening.


    This Speakers Corner LP was remastered using pure analogue components only, from the master tapes through to the cutting head. All royalties and mechanical rights have been paid.

    Musicians:



    • Hector Berlioz (composer)
    • The New York Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Dimitri Mitropoulos



    Recording: February 1957 in New York




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. I - Reveries; Passions
    2. II - Un Bal
    3. III - ScÉne Aux Champs
    4. IV - Marche Au Supplice
    5. V Songe D'Une Nuit Du Sabbat
    Hector Berlioz
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Gershwin: Rhapsody In Blue, An American In Paris (Speakers Corner) Gershwin: Rhapsody In Blue, An American In Paris (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Gershwin: Rhapsody In Blue, An American In Paris (Speakers Corner)

    This fast and furious orchestral work with piano, which begins with what must surely be the most famous clarinet glissando of modern times, was composed with the intention of presenting as many facets as possible of music from the New World in the short space of around 15 minutes. In his Rhapsody In Blue Gershwin wanted to »paint a musical kaleidoscope of America - our enormous melting pot, our typical national traits, our blues, our seething city life«. With this in mind, Leonard Bernstein made a number of recordings of the work and among the many excellent recordings that he made as a conductor or as a soloist, this present version with the Columbia Orchestra, from 1959, is especially of note. Bernstein takes on a double function as conductor and soloist and manoeuvres his way safely and surely through the highly diversified score to create a well-rounded picture filled with hefty orchestral dynamics and finely chiselled solo playing. In Gershwin's freely composed work the soloist and orchestra do not resort to bombastic shock effects or egomaniac keyboard acrobatics, and so this the work can be described as rhapsodic in the very best sense of the word.
    Most fittingly, on the B side there is another freely composed work - the autobiographical sketch entitled An American In Paris. The superb New York musicians paint the impressions of a visitor to the hectic French capital city - that too is the sound of America.


    Musicians:



    • The Columbia Symphony Orchestra

    • New York Philharmonic Orchestra

    • George Gershwin (composer)

    • Leonard Bernstein (conductor)




    Recording: June 1959 and December 1958 at St George Hotel, Brooklyn, New York, by Fred Plaut and Frank Bruno

    Production: John McClure



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Rhapsody In Blue
    2. An American In Paris
    Leonard Bernstein
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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