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  • Elvis' Golden Records No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Elvis' Golden Records No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Elvis' Golden Records No. 1 (Speakers Corner)

    Have we got the lot? The King of Rock'n'Roll certainly didn't need to ask whether his entourage had collected together all their favourite hits. They had gathered them all together - a collection of Golden Records, rather like a selection box of favourite chocolates, greedily swallowed down and enjoyed to the full. And how they loved them all - whether 'complete works' collectors or fans. To this very day, this collection from 1958 is quite set apart from the normal 'best of' collections. It shines out like a precious jewel among mere pebbles. This was the first of four Gold volumes, and it set the standard for those to come. Before any of the immemorable songs came to be included, they had to have sold at least a million copies and won an undeniable and unforgettable reputation as a heart-string plucker. To name a title is more than superfluous. It's quite enough just to listen and enjoy. Whoever wants the ultimate basic Elvis collection can't go wrong here.



    Musicians:



    • Elvis Presley (guitar, vocal)

    • The Jordanaires (vocal)

    • and various bands




    Recordings: January 1956 - September 1957 in Hollywood, New York and Nashville in mono

    Production: Steve Sholes


    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Hound Dog
    2. Loving You
    3. All Shook Up
    4. Heartbreak Hotel
    5. Jailhouse Rock
    6. Love Me
    7. Too Much
    8. Don't Be Cruel
    9. That's When Your Heartaches Begin
    10. (Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear
    11. Love Me Tender
    12. Treat Me Nice
    13. Anyway You Want Me (That's How I Will Be)
    14. I Want You, I Need You, I Love You
    Elvis Presley
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl Mono - Sealed Buy Now
  • Undercurrent (Pure Pleasure) Undercurrent (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Undercurrent (Pure Pleasure)

    This is the first of two superb albums recorded by Bill Evans, and guitarist Jim Hall, and it was recorded over two sessions in April and May 1962. Arrangements simply for piano and guitar are rare in Jazz, and it is even more seldom that the results are truly inspiring and as musically worthwhile as in this case. It is usual for intuitive musical relationships to develop over a number of years, but here we find two musicians who clearly shared an immediate understanding.



    Both men are on absolute top form here - Bill Evans was on fire throughout the early and mid sixties, and after the tragic death of his previous musical partner, virtuoso bass player Scott Le Faro (at the age of 23), he was searching for new directions. Jim Hall is a guitarist of tremendous skill and powerful technique, with a highly developed rhythmic and harmonic sense that shines through on this album. What is so special about the performances here is an almost telepathic anticipation of where the music is heading - both musicians contribute equally, and there is a constant exchange of ideas, each reacting to the other with apparent ease, whatever the mood.



    This is a brilliant jazz album, of great depth and tremendous atmosphere, and both players express some exceptional ideas. Highly recommended.




    Musicians:



    • Bill Evans (piano)

    • Jim Hall (guitar)




    Recording: April & May 1962 at Sound Makers, New York, by Bill Schwartau



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. My Funny Valentine
    2. I Hear A Rhapsody
    3. Dream Gypsy
    4. Romain
    5. Skating In Central Park
    6. Darn That Dream
    Bill Evans & Jim Hall
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Toto IV (Speakers Corner) Toto IV (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Toto IV (Speakers Corner)

    Anyone who gives the dull name "Four" to their rock album must either be very sure of success or already have resigned. The group Toto may well have experienced such extremes as there was an enormous cleft between their amazing financial success and the crushing negative opinions voiced by the critics. Billboard criticised the superficial lyrics as being void of any sort of emotional weight while the Los Angeles Times aimed their fire at the musicians themselves, slamming them as dubious artists with a commercialised mentality.



    To this Toto struck back with their fourth album, which was an unparalleled success and brought them six Grammy awards. For a whole ten months Africa reigned at Number 1 on the charts and together with the super-hit Rosanna the two smash hits were a constant presence, backed up by a collection of impressive rock classics. A trip to the record shop is all that is needed to prove that this is unlikely to change in the near future. The bright red cover with its depiction of a sword will catch your eye, as though saying: It's got to be the Fourth!



    Musicians:



    • Steve Porcaro, David Paich (keyboard, vocal)

    • Steve Lukather (guitar, vocal)

    • Bobby Kimball (vocal)

    • David Hungate (bass)

    • Jeff Porcaro (drums, percussion)





    Recording: 1982 at Sunset Sound, Los Angeles, by David Leonard, Peggy McCreary & Terry Christian and Record One, Los Angeles, by Jamie Ledner, Niko Bolas & Lon LeMaster

    Production: Toto




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Rosanna
    2. Make Believe
    3. I Won't Hold You Back
    4. Good For You
    5. It's a Feeling
    6. Afraid Of Love
    7. Lovers In The Night
    8. We Made It
    9. Waiting For Your Love
    10. Africa

    Toto
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Beck, Bogert & Appice (Speakers Corner) Beck, Bogert & Appice (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Beck, Bogert & Appice (Speakers Corner)

    On the whole, the supergroups of the Seventies didn't last very long, but for that - all the more notably. This certainly applies to the Anglo-American trio made up of the extremely talented though narcissistic guitarist Jeff Beck, the bass-player Tim Bogert, and the drummer Carmine Appice. As early as 1970, the British Beck wanted to engage the two American musicians for a joint project. This plan however had to be postponed for two years because the speed-mad Beck had had a serious car accident and needed time to recover. 1973 saw the release of the trio's first and only studio album, which not only demonstrated Beck's powerful-hectic style of guitar playing but also allowed his musical companions to show off their prowess. The trio applied their musical talents to all facets of rock 'n' roll, right from the bluesy first number (Black Cat Moan), via the agile rock sound of Lady, ending up with the moans of a vocal love ballad (Oh To Love You), followed by a really convincing gospel song (Sweet And Surrender) and the super funky beat of Lose Myself With You.
    The trio seemed to lust for more - but this was not to be. For the very next year, during the intense preparations for their next studio album, the moody Jeff Beck dissolved the group on the spur of the moment.



    Musicians:



    • Jeff Beck (guitar, vocal)

    • Jimmy Greenspoon (piano)

    • Duane Hitchings (keyboards,melophone, piano)

    • Tim Bogert (bass)

    • Carmine Appice (drums, vocal)

    • Danny Hutton (background vocal)




    Recording: 1973 by Baker Bigsby and Gray Starr

    Production: Don Nix and The Boys




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Black Cat Moan
    2. Lady
    3. Oh To Love You
    4. Superstition
    5. Sweet Surrender
    6. Why Should I Care
    7. Lose Myself With You
    8. Livin' Alone
    9. I'm So Alone
    Jeff Beck, Tim Bogert & Carmine Apprice
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mister Guitar (Speakers Corner) Mister Guitar (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Mister Guitar (Speakers Corner)

    At a time when rock 'n' roll-crazy teenagers in the USA and elsewhere were dancing their feet off to the beat of Elvis Presley and Bill Haley, probably no one was interested as to where this music actually originated. The focal point of the folk movement was Tennessee: it was here that everyone came who had used their grandfathers' songs and fiddle tunes to create the pop-oriented Nashville Sound, a sound which became American music's trademark and export hit.



    Chet Atkins is one of the people who helped to create this special sound and who kept an Argus-eyed watch on its originality and development. In addition to the recordings he made in his own studio, he was also a producer and studio guitarist for RCA.



    This album features Chet Atkins as "Mister Guitar", who - as a soloist - only allowed a small and highly discreet rhythm group to accompany him. The result is a refreshingly pure and unadulterated steel-string sound without frills and padding and so has little in common with the commercial country music of the masses. With his relaxed, technically perfect and highly variable playing technique, Atkins shows us what the New World has to offer in the way of folk music: highly melodic numbers which delight the ear with the simplest of means.





    Musicians:



    • Chet Atkins (guitar) and band




    Recording: 1959 in Nashville, Tennessee, by Bob Farris and Bill Porter

    Production: Chet Atkins




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. I Know That You Know
    2. Rainbow
    3. Hello Bluebird
    4. Siesta
    5. Country Style
    6. Show Me The Way Go Home
    7. Im Forever Blowing Bubbles
    8. Backwoods
    9. Country Gentleman
    10. Slinkey
    11. Jessie
    12. Concerto In C Minor
    Chet Atkins
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner) The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner)

    After the break-up of John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in the summer of 1967, the time seemed ripe for Peter Green, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood to take their leave from raw British rock 'n' roll. The newly established band Fleetwood Mac first turned to black blues, and their art of playing was so similar to that of other groups that the magazine Eye criticised them for their »almost ridiculous mimicry«. However, their choice of performance style took them in the right direction and in 1969, the year in which The Pious Bird Of Good Omen appeared, they landed at the top end of the pop charts, even ahead of The Beatles and Stevie Wonder.



    Of course, in the cover version of Little Willie John's Need Your Love So Bad, which is treated with a velvety string sound, and other bluesy songs, the American influence still makes itself heard, but not without success! The highly individual sound of the group comes best through in the now legendary numbers such as the weightless, gliding Albatross and Black Magic Woman with its Latin and blues elements. Judged the best British blues ever to be played (allmusic.com), one can now sit back and enjoy this great album.



    Musicians:



    • Peter Green (guitar, vocal)

    • Jeremy Spencer (guitar, piano, vocal)

    • Danny Kirwan (guitar)

    • Eddie Boyd (piano, vocal)

    • Big Walter Horton (harmonica)

    • John McVie (bass)

    • Mick Fleetwood (drums)




    Recorded between September 1967 and October 1968 by Mike Ross

    Production: Mike Vernon





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Need Your Love So Bad
    2. Comin' Home
    3. Rambling Pony
    4. The Big Boat
    5. I Believe My Time Ain't Long
    6. The Sun Is Shining
    7. Albatross
    8. Black Magic Woman
    9. Just The Blues
    10. Jigsaw Puzzle Blues
    11. Looking For Somebody
    12. Stop Messin' Round

    Fleetwood Mac
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Espana (Speakers Corner) Espana (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Espana (Speakers Corner)

    Sonically, this record - made in 1956/57 - is one of the best ever produced by DECCA. The listener is literally swept off his or her feet. To better enjoy this tremendous experience, we would advise listeners to put their feet up, relax, and listen with rapt attention. A "Do-not-disturb" sign on the door is to be recommended. The tremendous sound emanating from the loudspeakers immediately conveys the rousing nature of the music.
    Conducted by Ataúlfo Argenta, the London Symphony Orchestra plays with a rare vitality, pure enjoyment, precision and lucidity. This is a carefully chosen medley of Spanish music which, interestingly enough, was mostly written by non-Spanish composers.



    All in all, this has become a legendary recording, which caused quite a stir even in its mono version. The FFSS version ranks among the very best recordings ever issued.





    Musicians:



    • London Symphony Orchestra

    • Ataúlfo Argenta (conductor)




    Recording: December 1956 and January 1957, Kingsway Hall, London by Gordon Parry

    Production: Erik Smith




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Rimsky-Korsakov: Capriccio espagnol
    2. Granados: Andaluza Danza española No. 5
    3. Chabrier: España
    4. Moszkowski: Spanish Dances Book 1
    Ataulfo Argenta
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • It's Monk's Time (Speakers Corner) It's Monk's Time (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    It's Monk's Time (Speakers Corner)

    With its three compositions by Thelonious Monk, one might call this LP from 1964 "3 Standards and 3 Monks". The 'High Priest' of bebop had reached a further pinnacle in his career and performed with his fantastic, skilful and well-rehearsed quartet at numerous festivals and concerts. As if in a dream, the musicians penetrate the apparently simple yet rhythmically complicated themes, interrupted again and again by Monk's solo escapades on the piano. On the stage, Monk often stood up and jigged around the piano like a lumbering dancing bear, with one of his distinctive hats on his head; he plonks down on the piano stool after the Charlie Rouse solo; his enormous feet tap back and forth to the beat; he constantly fiddles with the ring on his finger; and he creates the most wonderful improvisations ever heard with his 'false' fingering.


    Calling all jazz fans: Listen to Thelonious Monk, and you will have a ball - most especially if you put this super disc with the promising title "It's Monks Time" on your turntable!



    Musicians:



    • Thelonious Monk (piano)

    • Charlie Rouse (tenor saxophone)

    • Butch Warren (bass)

    • Ben Riley (drums)

    • Teo Macero (producer)


    Recording: January - March 1964

    Production: Teo Macero



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Lulu's Back In Town
    2. Memories Of You
    3. Stuffy Turkey
    4. Brake's Sake
    5. Nice Work If You Can Get It
    6. Shuffle Soil
    Thelonious Monk
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mahler - Symphony #2 (Speakers Corner) Mahler - Symphony #2 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Mahler - Symphony #2 (Speakers Corner)

    The search for the extra-musical world in Gustav Mahler's philosophical and programmatic works will doubtless continue to occupy future generations of music scholars. Today's music lovers, however, are wholly satisfied with the highly varied interpretations and impressive sound reproduction - which is precisely what Mahler himself wished for his rugged works. For decades Mahler's dramatic musical masterpieces were misunderstood and scorned as "kapellmeister music". Luckily interest in his works was revived and all nine symphonies were recorded in the 1960s by the recently deceased conductor Sir Georg Solti. Right up to this very day, his cycle has clearly lost nothing of its aura, its reputation for "never having been surpassed" - how could it otherwise have been so successful for so many years in the light of all the highly competitive, more recent recordings?



    After the success of the new pressing of Mahler's First Symphony (DECCA SXL 6113), it was high time that the Resurrection-Symphony became available on LP once more. And the result is most impressive. One can only hope that the complete Mahler cycle will one day be resurrected in vinyl.



    Musicians:



    • Heather Harper

    • Helen Watts

    • London Symphony Orchestra and Chorus

    • Sir Georg Solti (conductor)





    Recording : May 1966 at Kingsway Hall, London by Gordon Parry

    Production: David Harvey



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve, booklet



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Gustav Mahler
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Beethoven: Sonatas Nos. 30-32 (Speakers Corner) Beethoven: Sonatas Nos. 30-32 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Beethoven: Sonatas Nos. 30-32 (Speakers Corner)

    Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Sonatas No. 30 in E major op. 109, No. 31 in A-flat major op. 110, No. 32 in C minor op. 111


    Myths abound when it comes to the late works of important composers. It is debatable as to whether this is due to their timelessness, or their often extensive form, which makes great demands on the listener, or simply the supreme skill with regard to the composer's own musical language, which is demonstrated in mature works. It is commonly understood that a performer of late works should treat them with due respect and possess an exceptional command of his instrument. But not so with Glenn Gould, who at the tender age of 23, shortly after his recording debut for the Columbia label of Bach's Goldberg Variations, dared to perform Beethoven's last three Piano Sonatas.


    Gould, as always analytical, yet supremely flowing, carves out the tightly-knit contrapuntal structure of the fast movements. The slow movements are finely perceived though free of contemplative sentiment and waft gently through the air, here somewhat drily dabbed at, then again singing and full of round, melodious piano sound. Bar for bar it is noticeable that the young Gould knows exactly what he is doing and with whom he is dealing. Here in the hands of this young maestro Beethoven's spirit is certainly compelling and intoxicating.

    Musicians:



    • Ludwig van Beethoven (composer)

    • Glenn Gould (piano)




    Recording: June 1956 at Columbia 30th Street Studio, New York, by Fred Plaut in mono

    Production: Howard H. Scott




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Sonata No. 30 In E Major, Op. 109 - Vivace, Ma Non Troppo, Sempre Legato
    2. Sonata No. 30 In E Major, Op. 109 - Prestissimo
    3. Sonata No. 30 In E Major, Op. 109 - Andante Molto Cantabile Ed Espressivo; Variations I-VI
    4. Sonata No. 31 In A-Flat Major, Op. 110 - Moderato Cantabile Molto Espressivo
    5. Sonata No. 31 In A-Flat Major, Op. 110 - Allegro Molto
    6. Sonata No. 31 In A-Flat Major, Op. 110 - Adagio No Non Troppo (Beginning)
    7. Sonata No. 31 In A-Flat Major, Op. 110 - Fuga (Conclusion)
    8. Sonata No. 32 In C Minor, Op. 111 - Maestoso; Allegro Con Brio Ed Appassionato
    9. Sonata No. 32 In C Minor, Op. 111 - Arietta (Adagio Molto Semplice E Cantabile)
    Glenn Gould
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Afro Classic (Speakers Corner) Afro Classic (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Afro Classic (Speakers Corner)

    In the Seventies, fusion was a popular pigeonhole for music somewhere between jazz and pop. At the same time it was also an often used, belittling term employed by critics and representatives of 'pure' jazz, who never wanted to listen to it, let alone include any of the numerous LPs in their collection.



    Forty years later, the dust has settled. Flautist Hubert Laws' recordings not only for the Atlantic but also the CTI labels are treasured - especially the present LP, which was produced by the 'Master of Sound' Creed Taylor. Now these crossover numbers from the worlds of classic, jazz, pop and easy listening are available once more. Discover, for example, Al Kooper's composition Fire And Rain (more familiar are the versions from Blood, Sweat & Tears and James Taylor), the famous theme music from the film Love Story, and three classical compositions by J. S. Bach and Mozart. All have been given a facelift and with such super sidemen ranging from Ron Carter to Bob James and a superb Freddie Waits on the drums, they are a real treat.
    So cast aside any preconceptions and enjoy this meticulous production and the clear reproduction on vinyl.



    Musicians:



    • Hubert Laws (flute)

    • Don Sebesky (arranger)

    • Fred Alston, Jr. (bassoon)

    • Bob James (electric piano)

    • Gene Bertoncini (guitar)

    • David Friedman (vibraphone)

    • Ron Carter (bass)

    • Airto, Richie 'Pablo' Landrum (percussion)

    • Fred Waits (drums)




    Recording: December 1970 at Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA

    Production: Creed Taylor





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Fire and Rain
    2. Allegro from Concerto No. 3 in D
    3. Theme from Love Story
    4. Passacaglia in C Minor
    5. Flute Sonata in F
    Hubert Laws
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Tale Spinnin' (Speakers Corner) Tale Spinnin' (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Tale Spinnin' (Speakers Corner)

    We played music that people listened to every day just as they watch the news every evening, music which changed constantly - just like the weather, reminisced Joe Zawinul when talking about coming up with a name for the group. This would probably frighten off listeners in today's mass market. But back in those days CBS was satisfied with the group's sound being somewhat similar to the Miles Davis Combo and offered them a recording contract without carrying out the usual sound check. The magic potion Bitches Brew, which Zawinul and Wayne Shorter had conjured up with Miles Davis, was promising of exhilarating new things to come.



    The heart-stopping mix of motivic fixed points and exciting improvisations, »the sketchy melodies, all that a synthesizer and other similar electronic devices could offer, combined with a Milky Way of rhythms« (Der Spiegel) was the pathway down which the group went - without ever becoming pure routine. The fifth album, Tale Spinnin', is captivating for its wealth of distinctive, often warm, synthesized sounds, which are further enhanced by Wayne Shorter's bright, twangy soprano saxophone, lending it a jazzy aura. To be sure, this gripping jazz fusion never progresses steadily all the time, but takes up snatchy, though seemingly familiar, melodic ingredients and combines them to produce a new mixture. Badia, however, is completely different: a quietly flowing and totally rhythmic ethnic work, which today would be classified as World Music.



    Musicians:



    • Joe Zawinul (keyboards, percussion, vocals)

    • Wayne Shorter (tenor saxophone, soprano saxophone)

    • Alphonso Johnson (bass)

    • Alyrio Lima (percussion)

    • Leon Ndugu Chandler (drums)




    Recording: 1975 in den Wally Heider Recording Studios, San Francisco, von Bruce Botnick

    Production: Josef Zawinul und Wayne Shorter





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Man In the Green Shirt
    2. Lusitanos
    3. Between the Thighs
    4. Badia
    5. Freezing Fire
    6. Five Short Stories
    Weather Report
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • That's The Way Of The World (Speakers Corner) That's The Way Of The World (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    That's The Way Of The World (Speakers Corner)

    Ranked 493/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.


    OK, so it's disco sound, but it's really good. Whoever says that today must have been pretty lively on their feet in the 70s and 80s and in the days of their youth they will definitely have noticed that the commercial fusion music they listened to on a Saturday night was buzzing with energy and excitement. Earth, Wind & Fire considered their amazing mix of Latin, Gospel, Soul, Funk and dynamic horn section as being of existential importance. This was the album that would either make or break the band: either they would establish themselves or they would sink into oblivion like so many other rhythm and blues acts.



    The basic recipe - finely chiselled Latin beat, meaty bass grooves and sizzling funky improvisations, spiced with the sound of exotic instruments - works perfectly. Furthermore, crowned with a beautifully airy falsetto and relaxed harmonious singing, the band created a big-band sound that the magazine Rolling Stone described as »innovative yet popular, precise yet sensual, calculated yet galvanizing«. Almost two decades later, and with more than three million albums sold in the USA alone, the editorial team voted the LP into their list of the '500 Greatest Albums of All Time'. And about time too! At last today's ravers and rappers also get the opportunity to experience the great rhythms to which their daddies danced.



    Musicians:



    • Maurice White (vocal, percussion, drums)

    • Verdine White (vocal, bass, percussion)

    • Philip Bailey (vocal, conga, percussion)

    • Larry Dunn (piano, organ, synthesizer)

    • Al McKay (guitar, percussion)

    • Ralph Johnson (drums, percussion)

    • Johnny Graham (guitar)

    • Fred White (drums, percussion)




    Recording: 1975 at Caribou Ranch in Nederland, Colorado (USA), by Curt Wittig

    Production: Maurice White





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Shining Star
    2. That's The Way Of The World
    3. Happy Feelin'
    4. All About Love
    5. Yearnin', Learnin'
    6. Reasons
    7. Africano
    8. See The Light
    Earth, Wind, & Fire
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner) The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner)

    The Doobie Brothers weren't brothers, nor were they called Doobie. The band started life as Pud in 1969 in Chateau LibertÉ, a club in the mountains of California. The group took on the slang name for marihuana cigarettes (doobie) one year later. The Doobies' music, however, never sounded like that of befuddled, half-stoned junkies. Heavy metal hard rock was their thing which made their record company Warner target the bikers of the rocker scene. The idea backfired, though, because the band had far more to offer than explosive hard rock.



    The album The Captain And Me is considered to be the group's most concentrated and versatile production since it contrasts aggressive, hard numbers with gentle ones full of melodiousness. The very first number, Natural Thing, shows how winsome vocal folk music and electric guitar riffs can be amalgamated into rock music. Amongst these titles, decidedly angry numbers such as Without You and Evil Woman became real trailblazers. Now and then, an extensive harp solo or nonchalant licks from the acoustic guitar remind one of the pungent bluegrass style emanating from the South. That even the sweet wailing of the steel guitar (South City Midnight Lady) finds room for expression seems quite logical in this well-thought-out musical concept.



    Musicians:



    • Tom Johnston (guitar, harmonica, synthesizer, vocals)

    • Patrick Simmons (guitar, synthesizer, vocals)

    • John Hartman (percussion, drums, vocals)

    • Tiran Porter (bass, vocals)

    • Michael Hossack (drums, conga, percussion)



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Natural Thing
    2. Long Train Runnin'
    3. China Grove
    4. Dark Eyed Cajun Woman
    5. Clear As The Driven Snow
    6. Without You
    7. South City Midnight Lady
    8. Evil Woman
    9. Ukiah
    10. The Captain And Me
    The Doobie Brothers
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • For LP Fans Only (Speakers Corner) For LP Fans Only (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    For LP Fans Only (Speakers Corner)

    Along with the album A Date With Elvis (RCA LPM-2011), For LP Fans Only is one of the most important special productions of the young King of Rock'n'Roll. Because Elvis had been conscripted into the US army, no new recordings could take place, and so record producers delved deep into the sound archives and dug out a few singles from his Sun Records days, mixed them with a couple of early RCA songs and a number from the Love Me Tender soundtrack, and, hey presto! a new Elvis LP was born. The overwhelming success of this album is not solely confined to the stylistic homogeneity of this collection of fresh, youthful songs. Far more, it's because for many fans the record offered the only substitution for the highly coveted but rare original singles That's All Right, Mystery Train and My Baby Left Me.



    Not without reason has today's 'bits-and-bytes' generation ignored the words on the cover and produced several re-releases. Which just goes to emphasise the widespread opinion that this is one of Elvis's very best albums and at the same time one of the most important in the whole of rock'n'roll - especially in the present vinyl pressing.





    Musicians:



    • Elvis Presley (guitar, vocal)

    • Various Bands







    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. That's All Right

    2. Lawdy, Miss Clawdy

    3. Mystery Train

    4. Playing For Keeps

    5. Poor Boy

    6. My Baby Left Me

    7. I Was The One

    8. Shake, Rattle And Roll

    9. I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone

    10. You're A Heartbreaker
    Elvis Presley
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Orange Blossom Special (Speakers Corner) Orange Blossom Special (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Orange Blossom Special (Speakers Corner)

    Just like the often sung-about fellow locomotives 'Midnight Special' and the 'Chattenooga Choo Choo', the 'Orange Blossom Special' finds itself bathed in the very best tradition of American long-distance trains and memorable journeys. Puffing steam trains symbolise an atmosphere of departure, endurance and the mechanical pulse beat of profit-oriented industrialisation, while also conjuring up the spirit of down-and-outs who tramp from one end of the country to the other along the railtracks, dodging train fares.



    Almost guilelessly at first, the album number 20 forged ahead into the hearts and hips of Cash fans with old favourites and climbed to number three in the Country charts. If you listen carefully, you will notice that three top Bob Dylan songs have crept in - It Ain't Me Babe, Mama, You've Been On My Mind and Don't Think Twice, It's All Right. Dylan, who in his early years was far from enjoying cult status and was condemned a godless troublemaker, communist and traitor to folk music, found a perspicacious patron in Cash. In no uncertain terms, Cash demanded that Dylan's critics should »Shut up! ... and let him sing!« and even sang Dylan himself. This present LP is not merely a perfectly produced Country album by the Man In Black, but a traction engine for the work of his spiritual brother.



    Musicians:



    • Johnny Cash (vocals, guitar)

    • Charles R. Charlie McCoy (harpsichord)

    • Homer L. Boots Randolph (saxophone)

    • William K. Bill McElhiney (trumpet)

    • Luther Perkins (guitar)

    • Floyd Cramer (piano)

    • Marshall Grant (bass)

    • W.S. Holland (drums)




    Recording: 1964

    Production: Don Law, Frank Jones




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Orange Blossom Special
    2. The Long Black Veil
    3. It Ain't Me, Babe
    4. The Wall
    5. Don't Think Twice, It's All Right
    6. You Wild Colorado
    7. Mama, You Been On My Mind
    8. When It's Springtime In Alaska (It's Forty Below)
    9. All Of God's Children Ain't Free
    10. Danny Boy
    11. Wildwood Flower
    12. Amen
    Johnny Cash
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Black, Brown And Beige (Speakers Corner) Black, Brown And Beige (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Black, Brown And Beige (Speakers Corner)

    Black, Brown, & Beige is Duke Ellington's musical representation of the African-American experience in the United States. It is arguably The Maestro's greatest work. The triumph of telling so important a story so well through music alone makes Duke Ellington's Black, Brown, & Beige a masterpiece. It also displays Duke's, and Jazz's, highest achievement in long form. Whether you perceive it as a three-movement symphony or accept Ellington's own personalized terminology »Tone Parallel«, Black, Brown, & Beige matches conceptually and in artistic content the musical continuity of Western Classical's greatest names in their lengthiest works.


    The history of Black, Brown, & Beige is in its own right momentous. Ellington premiered the work at Carnegie Hall on January 23, 1943, at Duke's first performance on that illustrious stage. The Maestro has created the Come Sunday Suite. Duke Ellington basically reduced his three movement work to its first, Black, elevating that movement's spiritual theme, Come Sunday, making it the melody of the edited work. Truncating the symphony Black, Brown, & Beige into the song Come Sunday works because Duke Ellington has expanded Come Sunday through numerous theme and variations unknown to the original. The piece de resistance: a sacred text, by Duke himself, a text sung by the best known African-American religious singer in history, Mahalia Jackson. There is no doubt that it is the presence and performance of Mahalia Jackson which secures a home in the pantheon for this recasting of Black, Brown, & Beige, a work that already resided there.


    And Duke Ellington pulled off this coup with one hand tied behind his back, or without the services of his right-hand man. Overlooked over the years since the album Black, Brown, & Beige was recorded in February 1958 is the absence of Johnny Hodges (Hodges did a gig with Strayhorn in Florida during this period), the Ellington band's premier soloist


    The sides C & D are released on vinyl for the first time with this issue.


    Recording in mono.


    Musicians:



    • Duke Ellington (piano)

    • Mahalia Jackson (vocal)

    • Clark Terry (trumpet)

    • Ray Nance (trumpet, vocal)

    • Quentin Jackson (trombone)

    • Harry Carney (bassoon)

    • Paul Gonsalves (tenor saxophone)

    • Jimmy Hamilton (clarinet)

    • Russell Procope (clarinet, alto saxophone)

    • Jimmy Woode (bass)

    • Sam Woody (drums)



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    LP 1
    1. Part I
    2. Part II
    3. Part III (AKA Light)
    4. Part IV (AKA Come Sunday)
    5. Part V (AKA Come Sunday)
    6. Part VI (23rd Psalm)


    LP 2
    1. Track 360 (AKA Trains)(Alt. Take)
    2. Blues In Orbit (AKA Tender)(Alt. Take)
    3. Part I (Alt. Take)
    4. Part II (Alt. Take)
    5. Part III (AKA Light) (Alt. Take)
    6. Part IV (AKA Come Sunday)(Alt. Take)
    7. Part V (AKA Come Sunday)(Alt. Take)
    8. Part VI (23rd Psalm)(Alt. Take)
    9. Studio Conversation (Mahalia Swears)
    10. Come Sunday (A Capella)

    Duke Ellington & Mahalia Jackson
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Mono - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Recital (Speakers Corner) Recital (Speakers Corner) Quick View

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    Recital (Speakers Corner)

    Almost 45 years have passed since the death of 'Lady Day'. About 50 years ago she could be seen and heard in just a few rare concerts outside the USA. Alcohol, drugs, affairs and racial discrimination in the USA had all left their mark on her and only her voice served as a reminder of her great successes.



    It is thanks to Norman Granz that Billie Holiday signed a new, lucrative contract in the early Fifties. He drew the very best musicians into the studio and paid for excellent arrangers so that Billie had an opportunity to sing her old songs once again and record them for posterity in the very best sound quality.



    Entitled Recital, this disc compiles numbers from 1952 and 1954 which were recorded with various accompanists. The musicians themselves kept a low profile out of respect for Billie Holiday; even Oscar Peterson shows himself to be a sensitive accompanist, while Paul Quinichette demonstrates that he is a very capable replacement for Lester Young. In this repertoire taken from musical and songbooks from 1921 to 1935, 'Lady Day' manages to convey her personality and life story - even in the softest of songs! Those with quick tempi, too, such as What A Little Moonlight Can Do - one of the outstanding numbers here - shine out with a personal touch. It is not only young talented singers who should listen to these masterpieces at least a dozen times per week - these gems will delight the passive music lover too.



    Musicians:



    • Billie Holiday (vocal)

    • Charlie Shavers, Joe Newman (trumpet)

    • Flip Philips, Paul Quinichette (tenor saxophone)

    • Oscar Peterson (piano, organ)

    • Herb Ellis, Barney Kessel (guitar)

    • Ray Brown (bass)

    • Alvin Stoller, Gus Johnson (drums)




    Recording: May and July 1952, April 1954 in New York

    Production: Norman Granz





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. If the Moon Turns Green
    2. Remember
    3. Autumn in New York
    4. My Man
    5. Lover Come Back to Me
    6. Stormy Weather
    7. Yesterdays
    8. He's Funny That Way
    9. I Can't Face the Music
    10. How Deep is the Ocean
    11. What a Little Moonlight Can Do
    12. I Cried for You
    Billie Holiday
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Right Now (Speakers Corner) (On Sale) Right Now (Speakers Corner) (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $34.99 $19.99 Save $15.00 (43%)

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    Right Now (Speakers Corner) (On Sale)

    A great deal has been said about Blues and Rock'n'Roll musicians being inspired to great things by folk music. But one hears little about those who work quietly in the background, far removed from dazzling light shows, power amps and fog machines, and who create new strains of tender plants from the roots of traditional folk, so to speak. One such person is Wizz Jones from south England. He can write songs, and he can sing - but it would be far too simple to describe him as a songwriter. His cultivated and versatile performance technique on the guitar bears witness to his personal aspiration for perfection on his instrument. With Jones all this culminates in highly original high-end folk: he's particularly laid-back in groovy numbers (Right Now, No More Time To Try), where the elastic and springy sound of the guitar is enhanced with chirping sitar and wavering bottleneck slides so typical of the times. Alongside these are the carefully re-worked traditional melodies (American Land), a 17th-century tune (Raven) where the singer plays 'call-and-response' with himself, and a solid 16-bar blues (Deep Water) in the early Chicago style. Particular attention should be paid to the numbers in which he collaborates with Alan Tunbridge and is fired by his genial ideas - specially recommended: Mary Go 'Round.



    Musicians:



    • Wizz Jones (vocals, guitar)

    • Sandy Jones (banjo)

    • Pete Berryman (guitar)

    • Reanna Sutcliffe (piano, harpischord, vocals)

    • John Renbourn (sitar, harmonica)

    • Andy Fernbach (piano)

    • Sue Draheim (vocals)

    • Malcolm Pool (bass)

    • Ian Hoyle (drums)




    Recording: 1972 by Colin Caldwell at Marquee Studios, London

    Production: John Renbourn




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Which of Them You Love the Best
    2. One Grain of Sand
    3. City of the Angels
    4. The Raven
    5. Right Now
    6. Find a Man for You Girl
    7. American Land
    8. No More Time to Try
    9. Mary Go 'Round
    10. Deep Water
    Wizz Jones
    $34.99 $19.99 Save $15.00 (43%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Imported Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I Got Dem Ol' Kozmic Blues Again Mama! (Speakers Corner) I Got Dem Ol' Kozmic Blues Again Mama! (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    I Got Dem Ol' Kozmic Blues Again Mama! (Speakers Corner)

    When Janis Joplin died in October 1970 at the early age of 27, thus involuntarily confirming the beatnik adage live fast, love hard, die young, it was only a matter of time before she was crowned the "Queen of Rock". Of greater importance than this posthumous entry into rock 'n' roll's hall of fame is the recognition during her lifetime of her explosive vocal style, which - so Vogue - turned the whole history of singing upside down.



    Janis Joplin's discography is just as short and changeable as her life. After two LP releases with the standard 'cast' of rock musicians in the band Big Brother And The Holding Company, with whose excellent musical support she obtained her first recording contract with Columbia Records in 1968, the company provided her with a group augmented with organ and winds. Their intention was to broaden her vocal expression with blues and funk elements, which, however, her most loyal fans regarded as betrayal of the ideals of rock music. Rock fans in the Old World were less critical, especially since Joplin and her Kozmic Blues Band went on a two-month tour of Europe. For those Woodstock fans whose ears are still ringing with the band's full, meaty wind sound and Janis's bluesy soul singing, this album is an absolute must.



    Musicians:



    • Janis Joplin (vocal)

    • Cornelius Snooky Flowers, Terry Clements (saxophone)

    • Luis Gasca (trumpet)

    • Richard Kermode, Gabriel Mekler (organ)

    • Sam Andrew (guitar)

    • Brad Campbell (bass)

    • Maury Baker, Lonnie Castille (drums)



    Recording: June - August 1969 by Sy Mitchell, Jerry Hochman, and Alex Kazanegras

    Production: Gabriel Mekler



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Try (Just a Little Bit Harder)
    2. Maybe
    3. One Good Man
    4. As Good As You've Been to This World
    5. To Love Somebody
    6. Kozmic Blues
    7. Little Girl Blue
    8. Work Me Lord
    Janis Joplin
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Crossings (Speakers Corner) Crossings (Speakers Corner) Quick View

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    Crossings (Speakers Corner)

    In the 1970s, Herbie Hancock's Crossings was to be found on every IKEA record shelf in the student pads of jazz-fusion fans. The cover, with its psychedelic touch, also contributed significantly to its popularity - although it was unclear where the crossing was going to take us


    Nevertheless, the excellent trumpeter Eddie Henderson - often underestimated as an improviser and composer, and Benny Maupin - who like Hancock had grown up under Miles Davis's wing, present a wide range of sound-generating instruments - as was all the rage in those days. Synthesizer and Mellotron (a polyphonic tape replay keyboard and as such practically the prototype of the sampler) were permanent members of the group - and even produce here melodic arches of sound! Whether Bennie Maupin's Quasar launches the group and us into extraterrestrial territory (as stated in one review) is a moot point.


    This LP is a contemporary historical document, though it certainly doesn't sound antiquated. That's why younger listeners too will find pleasure in this experiment from the previous millennium.


    Musicians:



    • Herbie Hancock (electric-piano, piano, mellotron, percussion)

    • Bennie Maupin (soprano saxophone, flute, bass clarinet, piccolo flute, percussion)

    • Eddie Henderson (trumpet, flugelhorn, percussion)

    • Julian Priester (trombonbe, percussion)

    • Patrick Gleeson (synthesizer)

    • Buster Williams (bass, percussion)

    • Billy Hart (drums, percussion)



    Recording: February 1972 at Pacific Recording Studios, San Mateo, CA., by Patrick Gleason

    Production: David Rubinson



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Sleeping Giant
    2. Quasar
    3. Water Torture
    Herbie Hancock
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Backlash (Speakers Corner) Backlash (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Backlash (Speakers Corner)

    After his great success as a new discovery through playing on tour and in the studio with Art Blakey's creative and inspirational group, the Jazz Messengers, Freddie Hubbard made a dozen LPs over 16 years for Blue Note and Impulse under his own direction.
    It was no wonder then that a big record company made him a lucrative offer in autumn 1966. All in all, Atlantic Records released six LPs and the very first, entitled Backlash, is still until today the best of the bunch.


    Three numbers by Freddie Hubbard, one by Bob Cunningham, and two by friends, provide the basis for a successful transition between hard bop and soul beat. Hubbard made high demands on his fellow musicians James Spaulding, Albert Dailey and especially the bass player Bob Cunningham and the drummer Ray Appleton because they had to cope with the ever-changing beat. Right from the very first note, it is obvious that Freddie Hubbard had Fats Navarro and Clifford Brown in his heart and fingers. All the titles are excellent. Of special note, however, is Little Sunflower. The sound colouring of the flute harmonizes particularly well with Hubbard's brass, and Ray Barretto's contribution is more than mere decoration. You're certainly on the right track with this LP, no matter whether it's the beginning of a Freddie Hubbard collection or a further contribution to a large jazz collection.


    This Speakers Corner LP was remastered using pure analogue components only, from the master tapes through to the cutting head. All royalties and mechanical rights have been paid.

    Musicians:



    • Freddie Hubbard (fluegel horn, trumpet)
    • James Spaulding (alto saxophone, flute)
    • Albert Dailey (piano)
    • Bob Cunningham (bass)
    • Ray Appleton (drums)
    • Ray Barretto (percussion)



    Recording: 1967 by Tom Dowd, Phil Jehle and Adrian Barber

    Production: Arif Mardin




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Backlash
    2. The Return Of The Prodigal Son
    3. Little Sunflower
    4. On The Que-Tee
    5. Up Jumped Spring
    6. Echoes Of Blue
    Freddie Hubbard
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bizet - Carmen Fantasy (Speakers Corner) Bizet - Carmen Fantasy (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Bizet - Carmen Fantasy (Speakers Corner)

    Some violinists enrapture their audience with their purity of tone, others with their warm timbre, or their amazing technical virtuosity. Pablo de Sarasate y NavascuÉz was one of the very few violinists who combined all these merits, and in addition was a composer in his own right. The most famous of his 50 works are Zigeunerweisen, based on traditional gypsy folklore and the fiendishly difficult Carmen Fantasy.



    And what better proof is there than Saint-Saëns's Rondo capriccioso that it is perfectly possible to unite high-spirited joyfulness with a minor key. As the name suggests, his Havanaise is filled with the melodies and colourful rhythms of Spain: no wonder this piece is known as "the violinists' warhorse".



    It goes without saying that these 19th-century bravura pieces are an absolute "must" for all those who wish to join the annals of great virtuoso violinists. And today, 40 years after the making of this recording, general consensus has it that Ruggiero Ricci has taken his rightful place among the great virtuosos.





    Musicians:



    • Ruggiero Ricci (violin)

    • London Symphony Orchestra

    • Pierino Gamba (conductor)




    Recording: September 1959 at Kingsway Hall, London by Alan Reeve

    Production: James Walker





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Ruggiero Ricci
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Straight From The Heart (Speakers Corner) Straight From The Heart (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Straight From The Heart (Speakers Corner)

    Ann Peebles' climb up the career ladder was rather more conventional than spectacular in the tough, rough days of rhythm and blues. She was first discovered when she appeared in Memphis nightclubs, was given a break by the big-band leader Gene 'Bowlegs' Miller, and landed her first top hit with the celebrated song I Can't Stand The Rain.



    Towards the end of the Seventies she made a well-timed retreat just before the outbreak of the highly commercialised disco wave, only to return many years later with a revival of her old songs.
    Her album from 1972 has certainly not mellowed with age. Her singing is sharp and soulful, and comes right from the heart (Slipped, Tripped And Fell In Love). The beat is powerful, throbbing, young and fresh (What You Laid On Me) or surging and groovy (How Strong Is A Woman?). The arrangements come across as sophisticated and well balanced, yet do not baulk at harsh attacks from the winds nor from the use of Hammond and Hohner keyboards, which were so popular at that time. Melody, singers and big band are airy and finely interwoven (Somebody's On Your Case), while a fusion of soft swing and snappy acerbity (I Pity The Fool) rounds off this album which is filled with pure emotion, heart and soul.



    Musicians:



    • Ann Peebles (vocal)

    • James Mitchell (bassoon)

    • Jack Hale (trombone)

    • Andrew Love, Ed Logan (tenor saxophone, vocals)

    • Charles Hodges (organ, piano)

    • Wayne Jackson (trumpet)

    • Teenie Hodges (guitar)

    • Leroy Hodges (bass)

    • Howard Grimes (drums)



    Recording: August 1971 at Royal Recording Studios, Memphis, TN, by Willie Mitchell

    Production: Willie Mitchell





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Slipped, Tripped and Fell In Love
    2. Trouble, Heartaches & Sadness
    3. What You Laid On Me
    4. How Strong Is A Woman
    5. Somebody's On Your Case
    6. I Feel Like Breaking Up Somebody's Home Tonight
    7. I've Been There Before
    8. I Pity The Fool
    9. 99 Pounds
    10. I Take What I Want
    Ann Peebles
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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