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  • The Classic Christmas '80s Album The Classic Christmas '80s Album Quick View

    $19.99
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    The Classic Christmas '80s Album

    The Classic Christmas '80s Album features your favorite holiday songs from the 1980s as performed by Whitney Houston, Hall & Oates, The Waitresses, Wham!, Run-DMC and more!
    1. Christmas Wrapping - The Waitresses
    2. Last Christmas - Wham!
    3. Hazy Shade of Winter - The Bangles
    4. Christmas in Hollis - RUN-DMC
    5. Jingle Bell Rock - Daryl Hall & John Oates
    6. Do You Hear What I Hear? - Whitney Houston
    7. Christmas Is the Time to Say I Love You - Billy Squier
    8. Run Rudolph Run - Dave Edmunds
    9. Zat You Santa Claus - Buster Poindexter and His Banshees Of Blue
    10. Santa Claus Is Coming to Town - The Pointer Sisters
    11. Christmas Time Is Here - Ray Parker Jr.
    12. The Twelve Days of Christmas - Bob & Doug McKenzie
    13. This One's for the Children - New Kids On The Block
    14. Slick Nick, You Devil You - Fishbone
    15. Silent Night - The Hooters
    Various Artists
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Tougher Than Leather Tougher Than Leather Quick View

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    Tougher Than Leather

    Too many people sleep on Tougher Than Leather, Run-DMC's fourth album. But hear us out as we plead the case for this amazing LP.


    By 1988 there was a lot more competition in the rap game - Public Enemy, Boogie Down Productions, Eric B. & Rakim, Ice-T and many more had given Hollis, Queens' prodigal sons lots of competition. But Joe, Darryl, and Jay were still at the top of their game, and hip-hop fans should never let this classic - chiefly produced by their Queens neighbor, DJ and multi-instrumentalist Davy D[MX] - get lost in their crates.


    For starters, the album's first single, "Run's House" b/w "Beats To The Rhyme" is arguably the most powerful one-two punch of the trio's career, showing contenders to the rap throne that they could still destroy a beat, tag-teaming with power at any speed. Not to be lost in the shuffle, fans were also reminded on both sides that Jam-Master Jay remained one of the world's best DJs, flexing the pinnacle of what would be called "turntablism" a decade later. Both songs show a musical telepathy between all three that has rarely been equaled.


    The second single, "Mary, Mary," driven by an infectious Monkees sample, took a different approach, shrewdly ensuring that pop fans who jumped on the Raising Hell bandwagon had something to chew on. But, like "Walk This Way," the song wasn't just bubblegum - there was an edge to it, and the lyrical gymnastics were very real. It wasn't selling out, it was allowing fans to buy in. "Papa Crazy," driven in concept and by a sample from the Temptations' "Papa Was A Rolling Stone," followed a similar pop-leaning path.


    Overall, the lyrical content on the album was a step up from the group's first three LPs. It's easy to infer, looking back, that they were feeling the heat from their younger competitors in the rap game. The genre was changing fast, and they were up to the challenge. On cuts like "Radio Station," they bring substance to the grooves, by attacking Black Radio for its continual denigration of rap. "Tougher Than Leather" reminds the world that they were still the Kings of Rock, with hard guitars to drive the point home. And "They Call Us Run-DMC" and "Soul To Rock And Roll" both bring things back to their early days, with sure-fire park jam rhymes and killer cuts.


    Tougher Than Leather, which went platinum up against a lot of competition, perfectly bookends the '80s output of one of the decade's most important groups. It encompasses the full range of the trio's capabilities and reminds us that Run-DMC should never be forgotten as both pioneers and party-rockers. And so, we say, long live Joe, Darryl, and Jay!

    1. Run's House
    2. Mary, Mary
    3. They Call Us Run DMC
    4. Beats To The Rhyme
    5. Radio Station
    6. Papa Crazy
    7. Tougher Than Leather
    8. I'm Not Going Out Like That
    9. How'd Ya Do It Dee
    10. Miss Elaine
    11. Soul To Rock And Roll
    12. Ragtime
    RUN DMC
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Fat Boys (On Sale) The Fat Boys (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $20.99 $14.69 Save $6.30 (30%)

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    The Fat Boys (On Sale)

    Because of their comic image, some hip-hoppers dismissed the Fat Boys as a novelty act -- some, but not many. The fact is that they were among the best and most popular rappers of the mid-1980s. Along with Run-D.M.C., L.L. Cool J, and Whodini, the Fat Boys were the finest that hip-hop's Second Generation (as it was called) had to offer. After making some noise as the Disco Three, the rotund Brooklynites changed their name to the Fat Boys in 1984 and hit big with this excellent debut album, which is humorous, wildly entertaining, and unapologetically funky.
    1. Jail House Rap

    2. Stick 'Em

    3. Can You Feel It?

    1. Fat Boys

    2. The Place To Be

    3. Human Beat Box

    4. Don't You Dog Me
    Fat Boys
    $20.99 $14.69 Save $6.30 (30%)
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Run-DMC Run-DMC Quick View

    $22.99
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    Run-DMC

    Future archaeologists will discuss two periods in 1980s: before Run-DMC and after Run-DMC. It's no exaggeration to say that the group
    changed the course of music in the '80s, bringing the old-school of rap into the new with one simple piece of flat, black plastic.


    Coming up in the rap world of the early 1980s under the wing of Kurtis Blow (group manager Russell Simmons managed Blow, and Run
    was, at one time, a DJ known as "Son of Kurtis Blow") and Blow's bassist and burgeoning super-producer Larry Smith, the trio - Joseph
    "Run" Simmons, Darryl "DMC" McDaniels and Jason "Jam Master Jay" Mizell - learned from the best, but created their own path.


    1983 was the year that they first broke out. With only an Oberheim DMX drum program and some cuts by Jay, "Sucker M.C.s (Krush-Groove
    1)" was a shot across the bow to the slick, post-disco pocket rap had settled into. It was raw, pure swagger and it took both New Yorkers
    and music aficionados around the world by storm. The song's lyrics are a mandatory memorization assignment to this day by MCs learning
    their craft. "Two years ago, a friend of mine "


    The group's sound, which was laid out muscularly on Run-DMC, had a harder approach than their peers, thanks to producer Larry Smith's
    use of live musicians who laid down grooves but didn't soften the edges. Lyrically the group wasn't just about brags either, with songs like
    "Hard Times," "It's Like That" and "Wake Up" (the first two were singles). Run's and DMC's overlapping tag-team approach to lyricism was
    powerful and immensely influential.


    "Rock Box," another single and arguably the centerpiece of the album, was a nod to their hard edge, and a foreshadowing of their first
    worldwide smash, 1985's "King Of Rock." Jam Master Jay's DJ work was stellar, knowing exactly when to jump in and put listeners' ears in
    a headlock.


    The album was the first rap full-length to achieve Gold status, and as fans know, the group was just getting started - their next two LPs would
    take them to even higher status in the music world, critically and sales-wise. But this is where it all started, and it's a classic that still sounds
    fresh today as it did more than 30 years ago.

    1. Hard Times
    2. Rock Box
    3. Jam-Master Jay
    4. Hollis Crew (Krush-Groove 2)
    5. Sucker M.C.'s (Krush-Groove 1)
    6. It's Like That
    7. Wake Up
    8. 30 Days
    9. Jay's Game
    RUN DMC
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Raising Hell Raising Hell Quick View

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    Raising Hell

    Up until Raising Hell, the rap juggernaut we know as Run-DMC was still in its building and breaking-down- doors phase. In 1986 that
    changed, and in a dramatic way. With their third long-player, the group had reached the mountaintop. It was THE record that proved
    hip-hop wasn't a fad.


    Raising Hell marked an important and significant new era for the group. Leaving producer Larry Smith for up-and- coming sonic
    innovator Rick Rubin (still co-produced by Run's brother Russell Simmons), they began to fully transition not only their own sound, but
    the sound of the entire genre. Less live playing - with some exceptions - and a slicker, tighter sonic attack. Musical aesthetics aside,
    though, at their core they stayed true to the essence of hip-hop: two turntables and a microphone, or two.


    It's impossible to talk about the album without its worldwide smash, "Walk This Way," which hit #4 on the Billboard pop charts and saw
    the group digging in the rock crates to summon Aerosmith in the flesh, combining Steven Tyler's and Joe Perry's musicianship with the
    group's own take on the '70s classic. The song's video cemented Run-DMC as legit MTV
    idols, and both groups rode its wave to new heights.


    Beyond "Walk This Way," the platter is full to the hilt with undeniable classic singles: "You Be Illin'"; "It's Tricky"; "Peter Piper" and the
    fashion-world shifting "My Adidas." Each song was new proof that Run-DMC's sound was indeed new, but still familiar, and full of the
    energy, charisma and innovation that drew fans to their first two LPs.


    Aside from the singles, the reason the album stands up so well is the fact that there is virtually no filler. "Proud To Be Black" remains a
    pioneering and underrated cut when people talk about "conscious" hip-hop. And to make sure they never lost the streets that gave them
    their start, "Hit It Run," "Son Of Byford," "Is It Live" and "Perfection" all bring it back to the group's early days in the park.
    Besides the triple platinum status the album achieved, it was more than just a pop smash. It signaled a new era for rap music, and it was
    the no-turning- back point for the entire genre. This was the beginning of what we now call the Golden Era, and it still sounds as fresh
    today as it did three decades ago.

    1. Peter Piper
    2. It's Tricky
    3. My Adidas
    4. Walk This Way
    5. Is It Live
    6. Perfection
    7. Hit It Run
    8. Raising Hell
    9. You Be Illin'
    10. Dumb Girl
    11. Son Of Byford
    12. Proud To Be Black
    RUN DMC
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back Quick View

    $24.99
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    It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back

    Ranked 78/500 On Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums Of All Time.


    25th Anniversary


    I hated that record, said Public Enemy's Chuck D. Believe it or not, he's referring to Bring the Noise, the frenetic first track of It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back, the group's 1988 agit-rap masterpiece and breakthrough album. Public Enemy had recorded the song in October 1987 for the soundtrack of the forgettable Less Than Zero. When Chuck (a.k.a. Carlton Ridenhour) first heard the final version, he said, I practically threw it out the window.


    He changed his mind later that year when Public Enemy were on tour in England. I kept hearing people ask, 'What's this record you've got out? People are going crazy over it,' he remembered. I was like 'OK, pull that acetate out, and let's play it [in concert].' People went berserk.


    Bring the Noise, along with Rebel Without a Pause and Don't Believe the Hype - all conceived in 1987 at the group's Hempstead, Long Island, studio, Spectrum City - would become the foundation of It Takes a Nation of Millions, an album that's loud, obnoxious, funky, avant-garde, political, uncompromising and hilarious all at once. Chuck may have been disgruntled over Bring the Noise, but he always liked Rebel Without a Pause, the track that introduced Public Enemy's trademark sirenlike horn squeals. Hank Shocklee of PE's production team, the Bomb Squad, says that Rebel started out as a response to Eric B. and Rakim's I Know You Got Soul. We were going for something that had the same feel but with more aggression, Shocklee said. Because we were angry.


    For Rebel, PE coupled piercing squeals (a snippet from the J.B.'s' The Grunt played backward) with James Brown's Funky Drummer (Because that song was my milk, said Shocklee). Then it fell on Chuck to write the lyrics. I remember locking myself in the house for 24 hours, Chuck said. He emerged with verses that emulated Rakim's off-the-rhythm flow but stayed true to his own booming-baritone persona (Soul, rock & roll, comin' like a rhino); Chuck also dropped the name of black activist Joanne Chesimard, hinting at the political direction that his rhymes would soon take.


    Don't Believe the Hype, recorded just before Bring the Noise, was Chuck's first foray into full-fledged polemics, in this case against the media. The lyrics were inspired by a slight against Chuck by New York-area radio DJ Mr. Magic. PE had serious doubts about that song, too. We thought 'Hype' was just garbage, said Shocklee. Again, they saw the response the song got when DMC (of the group Run-DMC) blasted the track out of his Bronco in Harlem on a Saturday night. The whole block was grooving to it, says Shocklee.


    In January 1988, it all fit together. You had the combination of the noise from 'Rebel,' says Chuck, the tempo of 'Bring the Noise' and the subject matter of 'Don't Believe the Hype.' It set off Takes a Nation pretty nice.


    - Rolling Stone

    LP 1
    1. Countdown To Armageddon
    2. Bring The Noise
    3. Don't Believe The Hype
    4. Cold Lampin' With Flavor
    5. Terminator X To The Edge Of Panic
    6. Mind Terrorist
    7. Louder Than A Bomb
    8. Caught, Can We Get A Witness?


    LP 2
    1. Show 'Em Whatcha Got
    2. She Watch Channel Zero?!
    3. Night Of The Living Baseheads
    4. Black Steel In The Hour Of Chaos
    5. Security Of The First World
    6. Rebel Without A Pause
    7. Prophets Of Rage
    8. Party For Your Right To Fight

    Public Enemy
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Tougher Than Leather Tougher Than Leather Quick View

    $34.99
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    Tougher Than Leather

    Released in 1988, Tougher Than Leather was the culmination of the Rap/Rock road that Run-DMC travelled in since their earlier albums King Of Rock and Raising Hell. Its superb production, booming 808 beats combined with guitar samples, catchy choruses and smart rhymes made Tougher Than Leather undoubtedly the best Hip Hop record that came out in 1988.


    Great tracks include "Mary, Mary", "Run's House" and "I'm Not Going Out Like That". Its equal appeal to Hip Hop as well as Rock fans made the album a million seller, and underlined Run-DMC's stature as living Hip Hop legends all over the world.

    1. Run's House
    2. Mary, Mary
    3. They Call Us Run-D.M.C.
    4. Beats To The Rhyme
    5. Radio Station
    6. Papa Crazy
    7. Tougher Than Leather
    8. I'm Not Going Out Like That
    9. How'd Ya Do It Dee
    10. Miss Elaine
    11. Soul To Rock And Roll
    12. Ragtime
    RUN DMC
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Raising Hell Raising Hell Quick View

    $34.99
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    Raising Hell

    Following the success of King Of Rock, Raising Hell (1986) raised more than just a massive revenue stream by selling over three million albums worldwide. It's a well known fact that the record, produced by Rock/ Hip Hop production pioneer Rick Rubin, raised the bar for Hip Hop albums in general. Musically it indeed raises hell, being crammed to the brim with hard-hitting hooks, loops, samples, scratches, inventive tong-twisting braggadocio and catchy choruses. Too many classics on this one: Peter Piper with the massive Bob James bell drum sample It's Tricky (putting The Knack's My Sharona sample to extremely good use) and the song that popularized a certain brand of shoes in the Hip Hop community, My Adidas.


    However the album's flag bearer is undoubtedly Walk This Way which literally rendered Aerosmith's original version obsolete. Viewing from an eighties Hip Hop perspective, the collaboration with Aerosmith seemed rather unusual to say the least, but at the same time it proved that Hip Hop and Rock are merely next door neighbours. The album's timeless quality surfaces in its ability to bring together masses of fans of both genres.

    1. Peter Piper
    2. It's Tricky
    3. My Adidas
    4. Walk This Way
    5. Is It Live
    6. Perfection
    7. Hit It Run
    8. Raising Hell
    9. You Be Illin'
    10. Dumb Girl
    11. Son Of Byford
    12. Proud To Be Black
    RUN DMC
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • King Of Rock King Of Rock Quick View

    $34.99
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    King Of Rock

    Before Run DMC's collaboration with Aerosmith "Walk This Way" smashed the hit charts and proved to the mainstream that rock and hip hop are mere sides of the same coin, the seminal hip hop group already introduced both styles to each other on their second album King Of Rock. This groundbreaking record was the first hip hop album to go platinum. As its title implies, the dynamic trio claim their supremacy by combining heavy 808 beats and massive guitar riff samples, proving they were the baddest group on the block, period. Their sound influenced late eighties hip hop on the whole, most notoriously by their label mates the Beastie Boys. King Of Rock's influence is phenomenal. Not only did it introduce rock fans to a new music, its fresh sounds also made all hip hop that came before it sound dated. This 1985 record is a trailblazing album to the umpteenth degree!
    1. Rock The House
    2. King Of Rock
    3. You Talk Too Much
    4. Jam-Master Jammin'
    5. Roots, Rap, Reggae feat. Yellowman
    6. Can You Rock It Like This
    7. You're Blind
    8. It's Not Funny
    9. Darryl And Joe (Krush-Groove 3)
    RUN DMC
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Raising Hell (Picture Disc) Raising Hell (Picture Disc) Quick View

    $25.99
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    Raising Hell (Picture Disc)

    'Legacy Celebrates presents the 30th Anniversary of Run-D.M.C.'s classic 3rd album, Raising Hell, on a 180-gram picture disc vinyl featuring the Raising Hell album cover image. Includes the hit songs Walk This Way, My Adidas, It s Tricky, Peter Piper and many more.
    1. Peter Piper
    2. It's Tricky
    3. My Adidas
    4. Walk This Way (feat. Aerosmith)
    5. Is It Live
    6. Perfection
    7. Hit It Run
    8. Raising Hell
    9. You Be Illin'
    10. Dumb Girl
    11. Son Of Byford
    12. Proud to Be Black
    Run DMC
    $25.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Picture Disc - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Golden Age Of Bullshit The Golden Age Of Bullshit Quick View

    $24.99
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    The Golden Age Of Bullshit

    PARTYBABY is the LA based 4 piece fronted by Jamie Reed and Noah Gersh, who, despite being only in their mid-20s, are both veterans of the modern rock scene (Gersh with Portugal. The Man and Reed with 30 Seconds to Mars). Their music can perhaps best be described as loud, hook-heavy rock in the spirit of Nirvana, Cheap Trick, Weezer, "Ziggy"-era Bowie, The Stooges, Smashing Pumpkins and The Cars. Their self-produced debut album, "The Golden Age of Bullshit," is mixed by Andy Wallace (Nirvana, The Cult, Run-DMC, Jeff Buckley).
    1. Overload (Intro)
    2. Your Old Man
    3. Everything's All Right
    4. California
    5. Don't Say It
    6. New Years 2014 on a Beach (Felicity)
    7. I Don't Wanna Wait
    8. Overload (Final)
    PARTYBABY
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Ghostbusters: Stay Puft Edition Ghostbusters: Stay Puft Edition Quick View

    $42.99
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    Ghostbusters: Stay Puft Edition


    30th Anniversary Stay Puft Edition


    Marshmallow Scented White Vinyl In A Marshmallow-Like LP Jacket


    Includes 3 Collectible Stay Puft Lenticulars


    12 single featuring the original and Run-DMC versions of the song.

    1. Ghostbusters (from Ghostbusters) - Ray Parker, Jr.
    2. Ghostbusters - Run DMC
    Ray Parker, Jr & Run DMC
    $42.99
    Scented Colored Vinyl 12 LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bacdafucup Bacdafucup Quick View

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    Bacdafucup

    At the time that Bacdafucup hit the record racks and airwaves, Onyx seemed to be inventing a genre all their own: heavy metal rap. Of course, on closer inspection, it is not at all surprising stylistically, given their link to Def Jam and Run DMC, the record company and crew that introduced heavy guitar riffs into hip-hop. Onyx, though, seemed far more threateningly hardcore than Run DMC ever were, and each song on their debut album seems like a quick-triggered, menacing chip set squarely on the shoulders of MCs Big DS, SuavÉ, Fredro, and Sticky Fingaz. That the entire album from beginning to end circumvents almost any backlash by being so brilliantly catchy as well, is a sterling tribute to how strong a quartet Onyx truly is on this first effort. The group gives the impression that they wanted to spotlight the sort of cartoonish, directionless anger that existed in a lot of hardcore rap, and then funnel that sort of energy into songs full of singalong choruses and joyous, chanted hooks that lend a certain feeling of camaraderie to the whole album. The release is mostly co-produced by Run DMC's Jam Master Jay and newcomer Chyskillz, and its music has a tense, wired edge that amplifies the vividness of the threatening lyrics. Sonically, it has a hardcore East Coast/New York City cast, full of throbbing bass and screeching siren-like effects. The grimy urban vibe is matched by Onyx's narrative thuggery, discharged straight from the streets like pumped-up news dispatches and predating the roughneck rap trend by several years. It's hard to imagine, given the gritty content of the album, that Onyx was aiming for airplay with Bacdafucup; nevertheless, almost in spite of itself, it was so good that it earned just that.


    - Stanton Swihart (All Music Guide)

    1. Bacdafucup

    2. Bichasniguz

    3. Throw Ya Gunz

    4. Here 'n' Now

    5. Bust Dat Ass

    6. Atak Of Da Bal-hedz

    7. Da Mad Face Invasion

    8. Blac Vagina Finda

    9. Da Bounca Nigga

    10. Nigga Bridges

    11. Onyx Is Here

    12. Slam

    13. Stik 'n' Muve

    14. Bichasbootleguz

    15. Shiftee

    16. Phat ('n' All Dat)

    17. Da Nex Niguz

    18. Getdafucout

    Onyx
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • South Of Heaven South Of Heaven Quick View

    $24.99
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    South Of Heaven

    When it comes to death metal, no band is more convincing than Slayer. For other bands, focusing on death, Satanism, the supernatural, and the occult became a clichÉ; but Slayer's controversial reflections on evil always came across as honest and heartfelt. The group's sincerity is the thing that makes South of Heaven so disturbing and powerful -- when the influential thrashers rip into such morbid fare as Spill the Blood, Mandatory Suicide, and Ghosts of War, they are frighteningly convincing. With their fourth album, Slayer began to slow their tempos without sacrificing an iota of heaviness or incorporating any pop elements. South of Heaven would be Slayer's last album for Def Jam. When Rick Rubin and Russell Simmons (brother of Joseph Run Simmons of Run-D.M.C.) parted company, Slayer went to Rubin's new company Def American, while LL Cool J, Slick Rick, and other rappers recorded for Simmons at Def Jam.


    - Alex Henderson (All Music Guide)

    1. South of Heaven
    2. Silent Scream
    3. Live Undead
    4. Behind the Crooked Cross
    5. Mandatory Suicide
    6. Ghosts of War
    7. Read Between the Lies
    8. Cleanse the Soul
    9. Dissident Aggressor
    10. Spill the Blood
    Slayer
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Ghostbusters II Soundtrack Ghostbusters II Soundtrack Quick View

    $19.99
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    Ghostbusters II Soundtrack

    The Ghostbusters II soundtracks is a great blend of R&B, new jack swing, and rap. Featuring a redone version of Ray Parker, Jr.'s original theme by Run D.M.C., as well as two cuts from Bobby Brown (On Our Own and We're Back) and New Edition's Supernatural, the film's soundtrack is like a time
    capsule of radio in the late '80s. Although the film didn't spawn any truly essential songs, the soundtrack makes for a nostalgic journey that fans of the film
    (or '80s R&B) will have fun revisiting.
    1 On Our Own - Bobby Brown
    2 Supernatural - New Edition
    3 The Promised Land - J.T. Taylor
    4 We're Back - Bobby Brown
    5 Spirit - Doug E. Fresh & The Get Fresh Crew
    6 Ghostbusters - Run D.M.C.
    7 Flesh 'N Blood - Oingo Boingo
    8 Love Is A Cannibal - Elton John
    9 Flip City - Glenn Frey
    10 Higher And Higher - Howard Huntsberry
    Various Artists
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Diabolus In Musica Diabolus In Musica Quick View

    $24.99
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    Diabolus In Musica

    If, as some suspect, Beelzebub has a soft spot for hard metal, he'll be delighted with Slayer's raucous return to form on the group's eighth album. With producer Rick Rubin (Red Hot Chili Peppers, Johnny Cash, Run-DMC) back at the helm, the thrash-metal pioneers have trimmed the excess flab that weighed them down in the early '90s. Back in evidence is the clinical speed, power, and aggression that once made them metal's most revered extremists. But while their trademark breakneck riffing remains, Slayer reaches beyond the old routines to pack a greater punch. Love to Hate harbors a fat hip-hop groove, In the Name of God toys malevolently with grunge-rock flavors, and Point concludes the 11-song set at just under 110 miles per hour. Diabolus in Musica is an emphatic resurrection--and then some.

    --Steffan Chirazi

    1. Bitter Peace [Explicit]

    2. Death's Head
    3. Stain Of Mind
    4. Overt Enemy
    5. Perversions Of Pain

    6. Love To Hate
    7. Desire
    8. In The Name Of God
    9. Scrum
    10. Screaming From The Sky
    11. Point
    Slayer
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Back With A Bong! (Awaiting Repress) Back With A Bong! (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $15.99
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    Back With A Bong! (Awaiting Repress)

    As angrily socio-political as so much punk rock tended to be, the genre also gave us quite a few bands that preferred goofy madcap humor over social or political commentary -- including the Ramones and the Dickies. Murphy's Law, a band that came out of New York's mid-'80s punk scene, was among the genre's goofiest. The aggressively rockin' Back with a Bong! isn't a record that's heavy on political content -- song titles like Panty Raid, Cavity Creeps and Attack Oof the Killer Beers underscore the fact that wild, irreverent fun is the primarily goal of the Astoria, Queens residents. Profile Records -- which had become one of the largest independent labels thanks to rappers like Run-D.M.C. and Dana Dane -- turned to Murphy's Law in the hope of increasing its visibility in rock. The album wasn't a big seller, although the punkers did command a small following.


    - Alex Henderson (All Music Guide)

    1. Intro
    2. Panty Raid
    3. Yahoo!
    4. Attack Of The Killer Beers
    5. Cavity Creeps
    6. Ska Song
    7. Quest For Herb
    8. America Rules
    9. Rage
    10. Wall Of Death
    11. Secret Agent S.K.I.N.
    12. Push Comes To Shove
    13. Bong
    Murphy's Law
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • The Second Album The Second Album Quick View

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    The Second Album

    Back in 1995, Bay Area rap was at the big-ballin' peak of the mobb music craze, LA was chronically gripped in a G-funk indo smoke haze, Atlanta was
    enjoying its Southernplayalistic days, and NYC was entering a shiny-suit phase. There was no frame of reference for two lyrical emcees experimenting
    with the tonality and resonance of rhyme patterns. This was uncharted territory. The pairing of Lyrics Born and Lateef the Truthspeaker into Latyrx was an accident, LB recalls. Both emcees were solo artists, but when LB heard the pre-Endtroducing DJ Shadow beat which would become Latyrx' eponymous debut single, his reaction was, Oh my God, I gotta get on this.


    Latyrx was a syllabic tour de force which began with two dissonant voices -- one gruff and bassy, the other higher-pitched and trebly, both hella fluid -- it
    transmogrified into a harmonic convergence of doubled verses simultaneously assaulting eardrums. Undeniably, it was great... but weird. It was ill,
    Lateef recalls. We really felt like we had something unlike anyone else had done, he adds. Latyrx' first and thusfar, only, full-length, 1997's Latyrx: the Album, set the tone for what Solesides and Quannum would do, LB recalls, while 1998's Muzappers Re-Mixes EP spawned one of the only feminist-affirming club bangers in hip-hop history, Lady Don't Tek No.


    Though Latyrx never officially broke up, after Muzappers, both members followed their chosen paths to considerable solo success. Yet no matter how
    much acclaim each attained individually, the notion of someday making another Latyrx record was always present. It's probably the number one thing I
    got asked about in my career, LB says. 16 years (!) after the release of Latyrx: the Album, LB and Lateef have finally answered the prayers of long-starved fans who have begged, pleaded and, by now, tweeted about the possibilities of a reunion. An impromptu Latyrx set at a 2010 Jazz Mafia concert at San Francisco's Mezzanine led to an
    appearance at 2011's Outside Lands festival, Google's Summer Concert Series (they were the first ever hip-hop act to perform) and a last minute
    appearance as part of HITRECORD At The Movies -- a unique film and music traveling showcase curated and hosted by actor and artist Joseph Gordon-
    Levitt.


    Most recently the duo have performed at the Wintersalt Festival in San Francisco last December and toured the United States with super funk group,
    Galactic. Having just released a brand new EP titled 'DISCONNECTION' late last year, LB & Lateef are hard at work on the proper follow up to their debut album, a
    new record aptly titled, 'THE SECOND ALBUM'.


    Featuring a long list of producers and special guests, the album credits read like a music festival with artists from Tune Yards and Forrest Day to
    Blackalicious and The Decemberists stepping in to help create one of the most highly anticipated records of all time. What Latyrx brings to the table is a technical difficulty level rare these days in hip-hop and matched only by a few groups in the genre's entire history: Run -DMC, Jurassic 5, Blackstar, Freestyle Fellowship. Their challenging, intricate back-and forth arrangements evoke a lyrical version of bebop, with layer
    upon layer of rhythmic syncopation and vocal patterning constantly pushing the envelope.


    We have a good chemistry and it's kind of unique, Lateef says. We step up each others' game content, and both of us push each other in the originality
    department. What we've talked about is very simply, picking up where we left off, LB explains. The return of Latyrx stands as Very Good News for true hip-hop fans,
    lyrical aficionados, boom-bap beatniks, urban bohemians, wee tots in Reeboks, and Muzappers of all shapes, sizes, colors, and ages.

    1. Arrival [prod. by Jel of Anticon]
    2. It's Time [feat. Zion I, prod. by Amp Live]
    3. Reload [prod. by Jel of Anticon]
    4. Exclamation Point [feat. Forrest Day, prod. by Forrest Day]
    5. Deliberate Jibberish [prod. by tUnE-yArDs]
    6. Close Your Eyes [feat. Busdriver, prod. by Antonionian]
    7. Nebula's Eye [feat. 1-O.A.K. & Joyo Velarde, prod. by G-Koop & O-Man]
    8. The Power of Rumor (Leonard Is Lost) [prod. by Adam Theis and Lyrics Born]
    9. Watershed Moment [feat. The Gift of Gab of Blackalicious, prod. by tUnE-yArDs]
    10. Sometimes Why? [prod. by Chris Funk of The Decemberists]
    11. Every Man For Himself [feat. Joyo Velarde, prod. by Future People]
    12. Electric Chair [feat. Corey Glover of Living Colour, prod. by Kaveh Rastegar & Jeremy Ruzumna]
    13. Gorgeous Spirits (Aye, Let's Go!) [prod. by The Bangerz]
    Latyrx
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • NOW That's What I Call Halloween (Pre-Order) NOW That's What I Call Halloween (Pre-Order) Quick View

    $24.99
    Buy Now
    x

    NOW That's What I Call Halloween (Pre-Order)

    Pressed On 2x 180-Gram Orange & Purple Vinyl


    NOW That's What I Call Music!, the world's best-selling multi-artist album series, is pleased to announce the upcoming release of NOW Halloween!, the NOW brand's spooktacular first foray into the tricks and treats of Halloween-themed rock and pop music, ranging from TV (True Blood) and movie themes (Halloween, The Exorcist, Beetlejuice) to novelty smashes (Monster Mash, Werewolves of London) to radio perennials (Season of the Witch, Don't Fear the Reaper, I Put a Spell on You).


    NOW Halloween! showcases 18 Halloween-themed classic hits from a variety of artists including director John Carpenter's Theme from Halloween, Rob Zombie's Dragula, Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra & Chorus' O Fortuna, Mike Oldfield's Tubular Bells/Theme from The Exorcist, Blue Oyster Cult's (Don't Fear) The Reaper, INXS's Devil Inside, Jace Everett's Bad Things/Theme from True Blood, Warren Zevon's Werewolves of London, The Specials' Ghost Town, Oingo Boingo's Dead Man's Party, Bobby Boris Pickett and the Crypt-Keepers' Monster Mash, The Citizens of Halloween's This is Halloween, Donovan's Season of the Witch, Nina Simone's I Put A Spell On You, Danny Elfman's Beetlejuice: Main Title/End Title, Run-D.M.C.'s Ghostbusters, DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince's A Nightmare On My Street and Rockwell's Somebody's Watching Me.


    The premium content--by the original artists--selected for NOW Halloween! has never been available on one collection until the release of this special anthology.


    NOW That's What I Call Music! debuted in the U.S. in 1998, following 15 years of multi-platinum international success. The series has generated sales exceeding 250 million albums worldwide, including more than 96 million in the U.S. alone. All 55 previous releases in NOW's numeric U.S. series have reached Billboard's Top 10, and 19 volumes have reached No. 1.

    LP 1
    1. John Carpenter - Halloween Theme
    2. Rob Zombie - Dragula
    3. Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra & Chorus - O Fortuna
    4. Mike Oldfield - Tubular Bells (Theme From The Exorcist)
    5. Blue Oyster Cult - (Don't Fear) The Reaper
    6. INXS - Devil Inside
    7. Jace Everett - Bad Things (Theme from True Blood)
    8. Warren Zevon - Werewolves of London
    9. The Specials - Ghost Town
    10. Oingo Boingo - Dead Man's Party


    LP 2
    1. Bobby Boris Pickett and the Crypt-Kickers - Monster Mash
    2. The Citizens of Halloween - This is Halloween
    3. Donovan - Season Of The Witch
    4. Nina Simone - I Put A Spell On You
    5. Danny Elfman - Beetlejuice: Main Title/End Title
    6. RUN-D.M.C. - Ghostbusters
    7. DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince - A Nightmare On My Street
    8. Rockwell - Somebody's Watching Me

    Various Artists
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed PRE-ORDER Buy Now
  • King Of Rock (Out Of Stock) King Of Rock (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $14.99
    x

    King Of Rock (Out Of Stock)

    Before Run DMC's collaboration with Aerosmith "Walk This Way" smashed the hit charts and proved to the mainstream that rock and hip hop are mere sides of the same coin, the seminal hip hop group already introduced both styles to each other on their second album King Of Rock. This groundbreaking record was the first hip hop album to go platinum. As its title implies, the dynamic trio claim their supremacy by combining heavy 808 beats and massive guitar riff samples, proving they were the baddest group on the block, period. Their sound influenced late eighties hip hop on the whole, most notoriously by their label mates the Beastie Boys. King Of Rock's influence is phenomenal. Not only did it introduce rock fans to a new music, its fresh sounds also made all hip hop that came before it sound dated. This 1985 record is a trailblazing album to the umpteenth degree!
    1. Rock The House
    2. King Of Rock
    3. You Talk Too Much
    4. Jam-Master Jammin'
    5. Roots, Rap, Reggae
    6. Can You Rock It Like This
    7. You're Blind
    8. It's Not Funny
    9. Darryl And Joe (Krush-Groove 3)
    RUN DMC
    $14.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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