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  • Full Tide (Pure Pleasure) Full Tide (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Full Tide (Pure Pleasure)

    As an album, Full Tide most closely resembles Shine in its breadth and depth. It's not the shiny production as much as the material itself. Recorded in Ireland and Australia, the album contains some stellar, perhaps career-defining performances of a number of tunes: her readings of Bob Dylan's Lay Down Your Weary Tune and To Make You Feel My Love completely reinvent them. The emotion in her voice is a warm fire for the battered soul to rest in. As moving and convincing as these performances are, they are not the true gems in the body of this album. In fact, her version of Sandy Denny's Full Moon, with a pianist, a bassist, and a string quartet, blows them away. Her voice, full and dark, yearns across time and space for the absent one. It's an elegy to a love, but also to love itself and friendship as well. This is key in that there are a total of four songs here by the late Noel Brazil - Black's longtime collaborator and favorite songwriter - who passed away in 2001.



    Musicians:



    • Mary Black (vocal, arranger)

    • Pat Crowley (piano, accordion, keyboards, vocal)

    • Bill Shanley (synthesizer, guitar, vocal)

    • Phil Buston (guitar, percussion)

    • Steve Cooney (mandolin; guitar, vocal)

    • James Blennerhassett (bass, vocal)

    • Fran Breen (drums)

    • West Organ String Quartet





    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. The Land of Love
    2. Lay Down Your Weary Tune
    3. Your Love
    4. Don't Let Me Come Home a Stranger
    5. The Real You
    6. Stand Up
    7. Full Moon
    8. Straight As I Die
    9. Siul a Ru'n
    10. St. Kilda Again
    11. To Make You Feel My Love
    12. Japanese Deluxe
    Mary Black
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Joan Baez (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Joan Baez (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Joan Baez (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress)

    At the time of its release, Joan Baez's debut album was something of a revelation. The folk music revival was beginning to gather steam, stoked on the popular side by artists such as the Kingston Trio and the Easy Riders, as well as up-and-coming ensembles such as the Highwaymen, and on the more intense and serious side by the Weavers. The female singers on the scene were mostly old-time, veteran activist types like Ronnie Gilbert and Malvina Reynolds, who was in her sixties. And then along comes this album, by a 19-year-old who looked more like the kind of co-ed every mother dreamt her son would come home with, displaying a voice from heaven, a soprano so pure and beguiling that the mere act of listening to her - forget what she was singing - was a pleasure. Baez's first album, made up primarily of traditional songs (including a startling version of House of the Rising Sun), was beguiling enough to woo even conservative-leaning listeners. Accompanied by the Weavers' Fred Hellerman and a pair of session singers, Baez gives a fine account of the most reserved and least confrontational aspects of the folk revival, presenting a brace of traditional songs (most notably East Virginia and Mary Hamilton) with an urgency and sincerity that makes the listener feel as though they were being sung for the first time, and opening with a song that was to become her signature piece for many years, Silver Dagger. The recording was notable at the time for its purity of sound, and Baez's voice soars with an awesome purity of Fare Thee Well, House of the Rising Sun, and All My Trials, and the guitar accompaniment on Wildwood Flower, among other tracks, comes through with richness and clarity.




    Musicians:



    • Joan Baez (vocal, guitar)

    • Fred Hellerman (guitar)




    Production: Maynard Solomon



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Silver Dagger
    East Virginia

    Fare Thee Well
    House Of The Rising Sun

    All My Trials
    Wildwood Flower
    Donna Donna
    John Riley
    Rake And Rambling Boy

    Little Moses
    Mary Hamilton
    Henry Martin
    El Preso Numero Nueve
    Joan Baez
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Volunteers (Pure Pleasure) Volunteers (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Volunteers (Pure Pleasure)

    Ranked 370/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

    Jefferson Airplane, wrote the magazine Rolling Stone, is a ship which transports its passengers to the revolutionary fantasies of their own minds. If only the group had included such well-formulated psychological analyses in their lyrics, then they would probably not have shot so meteorically into the orbit of the psychedelic 'acid rock' scene. And what is more: as self-appointed executors of chaos and anarchy, they 'turned on' their fans with musical sexual allegories, drug-extolling lyrics and revolutionary songs. In 1966, armed with a lucrative recording contract from RCA-Victor, they won through against much opposition from recording company bosses and released their album Volunteers, thereby bringing what is probably the very best recording from their early years to the public.



    The music of these rock rebels is, in fact, a good deal less drastic than their texts. The leaders of the combo, Marty Balin and Paul Kantner, both of whom grew up in the Californian folk scene, have put their stake on melodic and rhythmically close-knit rock and multi-part vocals. And even today, one is still astounded by the wide range of styles favoured by the hippie generation, which stretches from the down-to-earth country music of The Farm to the electronically distorted collage Meadowlands.



    Musicians:



    • Grace Slick (vocal, organ)

    • Marty Balin (vocal)

    • Paul Kantner (vocal)

    • Jerry Garcia (guitar)

    • Jorma Kaukonen (guitar)

    • Steven Stills (organ)

    • Nicky Hopkins (piano)

    • Jack Casady (bass)

    • Spencer Dryden (drums)

    • Joey Covington (conga)




    Recording: 1969 by Richie Schmitt and Joe Lopes

    Production: Wally Heider and Al Schmitt



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. We Can Be Together
    2. Good Shepherd
    3. The Farm
    4. Hey Frederick
    5. Turn My Life Down
    6. Wooden Ships
    7. Eskimo Blue Day
    8. A Song For all Seasons
    9. Meadowlands
    10. Volunteers
    Jefferson Airplane
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sweet Sister Funk (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Sweet Sister Funk (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Sweet Sister Funk (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress)

    From the mid to late 60's the producer Sonny Lester was at the helm of some of the period's most significant jazz music (Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Orchestra, Chick Corea, Duke Ellington's 70th birthday concert) and also some of the genre's biggest hits (mostly from organist Jimmy Mcgriff). With the folding of the Solid State label in 1971 Sonny Lester formed the aptly named Groove Merchant label (named after the tune Jerome Richardson wrote for the Jones-Lewis Orchestra). He then produced some of the periods most notable soul/jazz, jazz/fusion from the likes of McGriff, Richard Groove Holmes, Reuben Wilson, Lonnie Smith to name but a few.



    This gem of an album from Ramon Morris, and one of the hardest to find on Groove Merchant, was recorded during what many people would consider to be the classic period for this particular brand of jazz/funk/soul/fusion. It was recorded not long after he'd spent time with Art Blakey as a Jazz Messenger appearing on his 1972 Prestige album Child's Dance along with Stanley Clarke and Woody Shaw. He then also recorded on the Woody Shaw album, also from 1972, Song Of Songs.



    He now teaches at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pa.



    Musicians:



    • Ramon Morris (tenor saxophone)

    • Albert Dailey (electric piano)

    • Mickey Bass (bass)

    • Mickey Roker (drums)

    • Cecil Bridgewater (trumpet)

    • Lloyd Davis (guitar)

    • Tony Waters (conga)




    Recording: 1972

    Production: Sonny Lester



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. First Come, First Serve
    2. Wijinia
    3. Sweet Sister Funk

    4. Sweat
    5. Don't Ask Me
    6. Lord Sideways
    7. People Make the World Go Round
    Ramon Morris
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Chet Baker And Crew (Pure Pleasure) Chet Baker And Crew (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Chet Baker And Crew (Pure Pleasure)

    The numbers heard on Chet Baker & Crew were among a prolific flurry of recordings Baker was involved in during the last week of July 1956 - fresh from an extended European stay. The crew on these sides includes Phil Urso (tenor sax), Bobby Timmons (piano), Jimmy Bond (bass), Peter Littman (drums), and of course Baker (trumpet/vocals). Joining the combo on both the original as well as the alternate take of "To Mickey's Memory" and "Pawnee Junction" is Bill Loughbrough (chromatic tympani). His unmistakable percussive accents and tuned drum solos give these West Coast bop tracks uniquely Polynesian intonations. The band members take full advantage of their individual roles and abilities as soloists to really stretch out on "Slightly Above Moderate" and the Urso-credited composition "Halema" - named after Baker's wife. The chemistry of cool that flows between Urso and Baker is perhaps at its finest during the seamless exchange heard on "Worryin' The Life Out Of Me". Timmons also boasts notable contributions throughout. His playful and scampering style dresses up the bluesy "Lucius Lu" and "Line for Lyons", among others. The latter is also notable as it contains the sole Baker vocal on this set.



    This LP reissue of Chet Baker & Crew increases the original eight-song Pacific Jazz collection to include all 14 tracks completed during three sessions in late July 1956 at the Forum Theater in Los Angeles.



    Musicians:



    • Chet Baker (trumpet, vocal)

    • Phil Urso (tenor saxophone)

    • Bobby Timmons (piano)

    • Jimmy Bond (bass)

    • Peter Littman (drums)

    • Bill Loughbrough (timpani)



    Recording: July 1956 at the Forum Theater, Los Angeles

    Production: Richard Bock



    Format: 2 LPs 33rpm



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. To Mickey's Memory
    2. Slightly Above Moderate
    3. Halema
    4. Revelation
    5. Something For Liza
    6. Lucius Lu
    7. Worrying The Life Out Of Me
    8. Medium Rock
    9. To Mickey's Memory (Alternate Take)
    10. Jumpin' Off A Clef
    11. Chippyin'
    12. Pawnee Junction
    13. Music To Dance By
    14. Line For Lyons
    Chet Baker
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Lady Day (Pure Pleasure) Lady Day (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Lady Day (Pure Pleasure)

    Excerpt from George Avakian's notes on the album sleeve:



    When planning this album, I had a hellish time trying to choose what I thought were the absolute cream of Billie Holiday. In the course of this wrestling, it struck me that not only were Billie's vocals incredibly perfect, but that I could not remember a single instance of anyone playing a bad solo or even a bad phrase among the hundred or more performances I had to choose from in the golden period of her work. Checking over records (which was almost unnecessary, because I could still remember them almost note for note) was a rather beautiful and somewhat shattering experience. Jazz, a product of so many things - musical evolution, the social scene of a particular time, the economic atmosphere of the moment, what somebody had for breakfast that day - and none of those tings will ever come together again as they did when these records were made.



    Musicians:



    • Billie Holiday (vocal)

    • Ben Webster, Lester Young (tenor saxophone)

    • Johnny Hodges (alto saxophone)

    • Roy Eldridge, Buck Clayton (trumpet)

    • Benny Goodman, Art Shaw (clarinet)

    • John Truehart (guitar)

    • Teddy Wilson (piano)

    • John Kirby (bass)

    • Cozy Cole, Joe Jones (drums)




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Miss Brown To You
    2. I Wished On the Moon
    3. What A Little Moonlight Can Do
    4. If You Were Mine
    5. Summertime
    6. Billie's Blues
    7. I Must Have That Man
    8. Foolin' Myself
    9. Easy Living
    10. Me, Myself and I
    11. A Sailboat In the Moonlight
    12. I Cried For You
    Billie Holiday
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Quicksilver Messenger Service (Pure Pleasure) Quicksilver Messenger Service (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Quicksilver Messenger Service (Pure Pleasure)

    Quicksilver Messenger Service's debut effort was a little more restrained and folky than some listeners had expected, given their reputation for stretching out in concert. While some prefer the mostly live Happy Trails, this self-titled collection is inarguably their strongest set of studio material, with the accent on melodic folk-rock. Highlights include their cover of folksinger Hamilton Camp's Pride of Man, probably their best studio track; Light Your Windows, probably the group's best original composition; and founding member Dino Valenti's Dino's Song (Valenti himself was in jail when the album was recorded). Gold And Silver is their best instrumental jam, and the 12-minute The Fool reflects some of the best and worst traits of the psychedelic era.



    Musicians:



    • John Cipollina, Gary Duncan (guitar, vocal)

    • David Frieberg (bass, vocal)

    • Greg Elmore (drums, percussion)




    Production: Nick Gravenites, Harvey Brooks & Pete Welding



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Pride Of Man
    2. Light Your Windows
    3. Dino's Song
    4. Gold And Silver
    5. It's Been Too Long
    6. The Fool
    Quicksilver Messenger Service
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure) Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure)

    In the intimate ambiance of The Village Gate, Nina Simone made pure magic with her voice and on the keyboard, one Manhattan evening back in 1961. She sang and played with a trio, which featured her favorite guitarist, Al Shackman. We are so fortunate that the moment was captured and recorded.



    I can't really categorize Nina's sound or her music and call her 'just' a fabulous jazz vocalist. Although, she plays extraordinary jazz with her voice, as in Just In Time. She has been often called a musical anomaly, because there is no one category for her work. She was trained as a classical pianist, and in cuts like Bye Bye Blackbird, the complexity of her piano comes through loud and clear. Her folk songs, like the biting House Of The Rising Sun, and Zungo, an African work song, place her at the top of a long list of folk singers. Ms. Simone's gospel songs, i.e., Children Go Where I Send You, can raise the roof and bring down the house, as she did at the Gate in '61. She is a protest singer, Brown Baby, and an actress, capable of an extraordinary range of emotions.



    Nina has the rare ability to dig into her material and bring unexpected meaning to familiar lyrics. She is eclectic with her taste and her repertoire. But whatever touches Nina, and whatever Nina touches, will reach you and evoke an emotional response. Her music is as fresh today, as it was 42 years ago, singing for that Manhattan audience. They could not have loved her more then, than we do now.




    Musicians:



    • Nina Simone (piano, vocal)

    • Al Schackman (guitar)

    • Chris White (bass)

    • Bob Hamilton (drums)




    Recording: 1961 in New York City

    Production: Cal Lampley



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Just In Time
    2. He Was Too Good to Me
    3. House of the Rising Sun
    4. Bye Bye Blackbird
    5. Brown Baby
    6. Zungo
    7. If He Changed My Name
    8. Children Go Where I Send You
    Nina Simone
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Undercurrent (Pure Pleasure) Undercurrent (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Undercurrent (Pure Pleasure)

    This is the first of two superb albums recorded by Bill Evans, and guitarist Jim Hall, and it was recorded over two sessions in April and May 1962. Arrangements simply for piano and guitar are rare in Jazz, and it is even more seldom that the results are truly inspiring and as musically worthwhile as in this case. It is usual for intuitive musical relationships to develop over a number of years, but here we find two musicians who clearly shared an immediate understanding.



    Both men are on absolute top form here - Bill Evans was on fire throughout the early and mid sixties, and after the tragic death of his previous musical partner, virtuoso bass player Scott Le Faro (at the age of 23), he was searching for new directions. Jim Hall is a guitarist of tremendous skill and powerful technique, with a highly developed rhythmic and harmonic sense that shines through on this album. What is so special about the performances here is an almost telepathic anticipation of where the music is heading - both musicians contribute equally, and there is a constant exchange of ideas, each reacting to the other with apparent ease, whatever the mood.



    This is a brilliant jazz album, of great depth and tremendous atmosphere, and both players express some exceptional ideas. Highly recommended.




    Musicians:



    • Bill Evans (piano)

    • Jim Hall (guitar)




    Recording: April & May 1962 at Sound Makers, New York, by Bill Schwartau



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. My Funny Valentine
    2. I Hear A Rhapsody
    3. Dream Gypsy
    4. Romain
    5. Skating In Central Park
    6. Darn That Dream
    Bill Evans & Jim Hall
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Blue Rose (Pure Pleasure) Blue Rose (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Blue Rose (Pure Pleasure)

    One of Rosemary Clooney's best records, and one of Duke's more accessible offerings, combined on one LP. The recorded output of the 1950's didn't get much more satisfying than this. Duke's music was always very sophisticated and this time it's even more obvious with a presence of such a talented singer as Rosemary Clooney. The songs are marvelous and she sounds young, fresh and sexy (ladylike sexy). In Blue Rose, not only are Clooney's vocals outstanding, but the arrangements are some of the prettiest of jazz.



    The band swings simply and sweetly, though still thoroughly in the Duke style. As if to make the point that the band is the 'other' star of this recording, there's one instrumental here - Passion Flower (Johnny Hodges on sax never sounded more sure of himself). Its inclusion in the program, without a vocal from Clooney, is at first bizarre - but seems to make sense within the context of the album.



    The fascinating album notes explain why and how separate tracks for Rosemary Clooney and Duke Ellington's orchestra had to be laid down. One would never realize that singer and orchestra were not together. They are totally in sync. This is not big, belting jazz; this is sophisticated, late night, intimate singing and playing. This is one of the most memorable pairings of a 'popular' singer with a jazz giant; ranking with the first Sinatra-Basie album and the Coltrane-Hartman session.




    Musicians:



    • Rosemary Clooney (vocal)

    • Duke Ellington (piano, arranger)

    • Billy Strayhorn (arranger)

    • Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope (alto saxophone)

    • Clark Terry, Cat Anderson (trumpet)

    • Gordon Jackson (trombone)

    • Jimmy Woode (bass)

    • Sam Woodyard (drums)




    Recording: January and February 1956




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Hey Baby
    2. Sophisticated Lady

    3. Me and You
    4. Passion Flower
    5. I Let A Song Go Out Of My Heart
    6. Grievin
    7. Blue Rose
    8. Im Checkin OutGoombye

    9. I Got It Bad
    10. Mood Indigo
    Rosemary Clooney & Duke Ellington
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Christine Perfect (Pure Pleasure) Christine Perfect (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Christine Perfect (Pure Pleasure)

    In 1976, Sire Records issued the first U.S. release of what had been a mega-import of the Blue Horizon 1970 U.K. release, an album called simply Christine Perfect, the maiden name of Christine McVie. You don't need a crystal ball to tell you the album is classic and tremendous - the big surprise is that it didn't go multi-platinum in the States. There are 12 tracks, and I'd Rather Go Blind went Top Ten in the U.K. It deserved to, but there's more here than the very good reading of the Etta James hit that I'd Rather Go Blind was. When You Say has strings and production that sound hauntingly like a Marianne Faithful track on London or Nico's work on Immediate.




    Musicians:



    • Christine Perfect (keyboards)

    • Rick Hayward, Top Topham, Danny Kirwan (guitar)

    • Martin Dunsford, John McVie, Andy Sylvester (bass)

    • Chris Harding (drums, percussion)




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Crazy 'Bout You Baby
    2. I'm On My Way
    3. Let Me Go (Leave Me Alone)

    4. Wait And See
    5. Close To Me
    6. I'd Rather Go Blind

    7. When You Say
    8. And That's Saying A Lot

    9. No Road Is The Right Road
    10. For You
    11. I'm Too Far Gone (To Turn Around)
    12. I Want You
    Christine Perfect
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I Remember (Pure Pleasure) I Remember (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    I Remember (Pure Pleasure)

    Jazz singer Dianne Reeves was born into a family rich in musical background. Her uncle, Charles Burrell, a bass player with the Denver Symphony Orchestra, introduced her to the music of jazz singers such as Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, and, especially impressive to Reeves, Sarah Vaughan.



    Her musical career includes a tour with Eduardo del Barrio's group Caldera; singing with Billy Childs' jazz band Night Flight; touring with Sergio Mendes; from 1983-86 touring with Harry Belafonte as a lead singer. She also sang at the closing ceremony of the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City.



    Reeves has been awarded four Grammys for Best Jazz Vocal Performances for the albums In the Moment - Live In Concert (2001), The Calling: Celebrating Sarah Vaughan (2002), A Little Moonlight (2003), and Good Night and Good Luck (soundtrack) (2006).


    Recorded at Madhatter Studios, Los Angeles, California on September 10-11, 1990 and The Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey on April 27-28 and May 9, 1988.


    Features:



    • 180g Vinyl

    • Re-mastered by Ron McMaster at Capitol Studios


    Musicians:



    • Dianne Reeves, vocals

    • Kevin Eubanks, acoustic guitar

    • Bobby Hutcherson, vibraphone

    • Greg Osby, alto saxophone

    • Justo Almario, saxophone

    • Charles Mims, piano

    • Billy Childs, piano

    • Donald Brown, piano

    • Mulgrew Miller, piano

    • Chris Severin, bass

    • Charnett Moffett, bass

    • Billy Kilson, drums

    • Marvin Smitty Smith, drums

    • Terri Lyne Carrington, drums

    • Ron Powell, percussion, wind chimes

    • Bill Summers, percussion

    • Luis Conte, percussion


    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Afro Blue
    2. The Nearness Of You / Misty
    3. I Remember Sky
    4. Love For Sale
    5. Softly As In The Morning Sunrise
    6. Like A Lover
    7. How High The Moon
    8. You Taught My Heart To Sing
    9. For All We Know
    Dianne Reeves
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • This Is Chris (Pure Pleasure) This Is Chris (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    This Is Chris (Pure Pleasure)

    During 1953-1955, singer Chris Connor recorded regularly for Bethlehem. This LP has her final recordings for the label (before moving to Atlantic) with such fine sidemen as Herbie Mann (doubling on flute and tenor), pianist Ralph Sharon, guitarist Joe Puma, bassist Milt Hinton, and drummer Osie Johnson. The two-trombone team of J.J. Johnson and Kai Winding (which had recently become very popular) is prominent on four of the ten selections. Connor's cool tone, subtle, emotional delivery and haunting voice were perfect for the music of the 1950s. Highlights of this superior set include The Thrill Is Gone, Blame It On My Youth, and I Concentrate On You, but all ten numbers are rewarding.



    Musicians:



    • Chris Connor (vocal)

    • J. J. Johnson, Kai Winding (trombone)

    • Herbie Mann (flute, tenor saxophone)

    • Joe Puma (guitar)

    • Ralph Sharon (piano)

    • Milt Hinton (bass)

    • Osie Johnson (drums)




    Recording: April 1955 in New York City by Tom Dowd

    Production: Creed Taylor




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Blame It On My Youth
    2. It's All Right With Me
    3. Someone To Watch Over Me
    4. Trouble Is A Man
    5. All This And Heaven Too
    6. The Thrill Is Gone
    7. I Concentrate On You
    8. All Dressed Up With A Broken Heart
    9. From This Moment On
    10. Ridin' High
    Chris Connor
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Back To The Blues (Pure Pleasure) Back To The Blues (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Back To The Blues (Pure Pleasure)

    Although she was one of the most powerful and moving of the jazz singers, Dinah Washington suffered more than most from unimaginative and erratic backings. Many of her EmArcy recordings, notably those with Clifford Brown or Clark Terry on trumpet, had outstanding performances, but her collections were compromised by unsuitable accompaniment. This set of 12 blues gives a lop-sided picture in that it doesn't include any of her ballad performances. However, the basic big band settings allow the power and verve of her singing to come through, and confirm her as the best of the women singers with blues material. During the 1950s she had been regarded as an R&B performer but arranger and band-leader Fred Norman wrote these fine 1962 jazz settings for her shortly before her death.


    The material is strong and Washington soars and swings, her voice reaching many of the potent climaxes for which she was so highly regarded. The material runs through much of the traditional repertoire--Big Bill Broonzy, Leroy Carr and Lil Green being represented--and there is a nine-minute Nobody Knows The Way I Feel This Morning that is unique in her discography.

    Musicians:



    • Dinah Washington (vocals)
    • Illinois Jacquet, Eddie Chamblee (tenor saxophone)
    • Jack Wilson, Patti Bown (piano)
    • Jimmy Sigler (organ)
    • Everett Barksdale, Billy Butler (guitar)
    • George Duvivier (bass)
    • Jimmy Thomas, Osie Johnson (drums)



    Recording: March - November 1962 at Bell Sound Studios, New York

    Production: Henry Glover


    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. The Blues Ain't Nothin' But A Woman Cryin' For Her Man
    2. Romance In The Dark
    3. You've Been A Good Old Wagon
    4. Let Me Be The First To Know
    5. How Long, How Long Blues
    6. Don't Come Running Back To Me
    7. It's A Mean Old Man's World
    8. Key To The Highway
    9. If I Never Get To Heaven
    10. Duck Before You Drown
    11. No Hard Feelings
    12. Nobody Knows The Way I Feel This Morning
    Dinah Washington
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Great American Songbook (Pure Pleasure) The Great American Songbook (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Great American Songbook (Pure Pleasure)

    This is a gem of an album and one of my favorites by McRae. It was recorded live for Atlantic Records at Donte's Club in Los Angeles on November 6, 1971, and released the following year.


    What I love is not only the choice of songs but the sound quality and the performance itself. The set not only contains established standards by Ellington, Cole Porter and the other greats, but some new (at the time) material. Including Burt Bacharach's They Long To Be Close To You in the set was a wise decision in my opinion. It deserves to be a standard. Of course, there is the obligatory Billie Holiday song that McRae would include in all of her performances. On this album it's I Cried For You, which was one of Billie's first recordings in 1936.


    The sound quality is superb. The engineer managed to capture not only the energy from the live performance, but the richness of the ensemble backing McRae. Indeed, the musicians backing her are perfect for the material: Jimmy Rowles on piano (who wrote the Ballad of Thelonious Monk), Joe Pass on guitar, Chuck Domanico on bass and Chuck Flores on drums.


    If you love hearing some of the best songs from the Great American Songbook performed by a master this album will delight you. There is a cohesiveness to the album that earns kudos from the production team as well as the performers. Interestingly McRae and her ensemble performed 32 songs the night that this was recorded. One can only speculate as to why a volume 2 wasn't released. Regardless, this is - in my opinion - some of McRae's best live material. - Mike Tarrani


    Musicians:



    • Carmen McRae (vocal, piano)

    • Joe Pass (guitar)

    • Jimmy Rowles (piano)

    • Chuck Domanico (bass)

    • Chuck Flores (drums)



    Recording: November 1971 live at Donte's, Los Angeles CA., by Ray Thompson

    Production: Jack Rael




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    LP 1
    1. Satin Doll
    2. At Long Last Love
    3. If The Moon Turns Green
    4. Day By Day
    5. What Are You Doing The Rest Of Your Life
    6. I Only Have Eyes For You
    7. Medley: Easy Living / Days Of Wine & Roses / It's Impossible
    8. Sunday


    LP 2
    1. A Song For You
    2. I Cried For You Now It's Your Turn To Cry Over Me - Introduction
    3. Behind The Face - Introduction
    4. The Ballad Of Thelonious Monk
    5. There's No Such Thing As Love
    6.They Long To Be Close To You
    7. Three Little Words
    8. Mr. Ugly
    9. It's Like Reaching For The Moon
    10. I Thought About You

    Carmen McRae
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Al Green Gets Next To You (Pure Pleasure) Al Green Gets Next To You (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Al Green Gets Next To You (Pure Pleasure)

    After the shaky start of Green Is Blues, Al Green and producer Willie Mitchell established their classic sound with Green's second album, Gets Next to You. The main difference is in the rhythm section. Abandoning the gritty syncopations of deep Southern soul, the Hi Rhythm Section plays it slow and seductive, working a sultry, steady pulse that Green exploits with his remarkable voice. Alternating between Sam Cooke's croon and Otis Redding's shout, Green develops his own distinctive style, and Gets Next To You only touches the surface of its depth. Although the album is filled with wonderful moments, few are as astonishing as Green and Mitchell's reinterpretation of the Temptations' I Can't Get Next to You, which turns the original inside out.



    Musicians:



    • Al Green (vocal)

    • Wayne Jackson (trumpet)

    • Ed Logan (tenor saxophone)

    • James Mitchell (bassoon)

    • Jack Hale (trombone)

    • Charles Hodges (keyboards)

    • Mabon Teenie Hodges (guitar)

    • Leroy Hodges (bass)

    • Al Jackson (drums)



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. I Can't Get Next To You
    2. Are You Lonely for Me, Baby
    3. God Is Standing By
    4. Tired of Being Alone
    5. I'm a Ram
    6. Driving Wheel
    7. Light My Fire
    8. You Say It
    9. Right Now, Right Now
    10. All Because
    Al Green
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Stand Back (Pure Pleasure) Stand Back (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Stand Back (Pure Pleasure)

    Vanguard may have spelled his name wrong (he prefers Charlie or Charles), but the word was out as soon as this solo debut was released: Here was a harpist every bit as authentic, as emotional, in some ways as adventuresome, as Paul Butterfield. Similarly leading a Chicago band with a veteran Black rhythm section (Fred Below on drums, Bob Anderson on bass) and rock-influenced soloists (keyboardist Barry Goldberg, guitarist Harvey Mandel), Musselwhite played with a depth that belied his age - only 22 when this was cut! His gruff vocals were considerably more affected than they would become later (clearer, more relaxed), but his renditions of Help Me, Early in the Morning, and his own Strange Land stand the test of time. He let his harmonica speak even more authoritatively on instrumentals like 39th and Indiana (essentially It Hurts Me Too sans lyrics) and Cha Cha the Blues, and his version of jazz arranger Duke Pearson's gospel-tinged Cristo Redentor has become his signature song - associated with Musselwhite probably more so than with trumpeter Donald Byrd, who originally recorded the song for Blue Note. Goldberg is in fine form (particularly on organ), but Mandel's snakey, stuttering style really stands out - notably on Help Me, his quirky original 4 P.M., and Chicken Shack, where he truly makes you think your record is skipping




    Musicians:



    • Charley Musselwhite (harmonica, vocal)

    • Harvey Mandel (guitar)

    • Barry Goldberg (piano, organ)

    • Bob Anderson (bass)

    • Fred Below Jr. (drums)




    Production: Samuel Charters




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Baby Will You Please Help Me
    2. No More Lonely Nights
    3. Cha Cha The Blues
    4. Christo Redemptor
    5. Help Me
    6. Chicken Shack
    7. Strange Land
    8. 39th And Indiana
    9. My Baby
    10. Early In The Morning
    11. 4 P. M.
    12. Sad Day
    Charley Musselwhite's Southside Blues Band
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • God Bless My Solo (Pure Pleasure) God Bless My Solo (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    God Bless My Solo (Pure Pleasure)

    The solo referred to in the title, God Bless My Solo, is that in "Flying Home" made by Illinois Jacquet into a Decca Records microphone in May 1942. This solo became one of the two or three most influential solos in all of jazz history, an 80-second masterpiece.



    Nearly every tenor player who followed made it a priority to learn that solo, note for note. But Flying Home marked neither the beginning nor the end of Jacquet's seven-decade career. He was one of jazz's great survivors, thought of as an outrageous musician when he was young but hailed as a classic figure in old age. He was as effective with romantic jazz ballads as he was with the explosive performances with which he made his reputation.



    Tenor saxophonist Illinois Jacquet is heard in top form throughout this quartet set, recorded for the French Black & Blue label, whilst touring throughout Europe in the 1970's.



    Musicians:



    • Illinois Jacquet (tenor saxophone)

    • Hank Jones (piano)

    • George Duvivier (bass)

    • J. C. Heard (drums)



    Recording: March 1978 at Barclay Studio, Paris (France), by Gerhard Lehner




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Jean-Maries Den
    2. You left me all alone

    3. Lean baby
    4. God bless my solo
    5. Things aint what they used to be

    6. From Broussard
    Illinois Jacquet
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • In New York (Pure Pleasure) In New York (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    In New York (Pure Pleasure)

    Lightnin' Hopkins was one of the most over-recorded artists in the blues genre. The recordings here were made at a pivotal moment in his career. In 1960, at 48 years old, he was no longer a star in the black community, but was becoming a folk legend. His deeply personal music not only reflected the experiences of his community but touched a universal nerve. Chris Strachwitz, who often recorded Hopkins, has called his records »brief audio snapshots of one of the great folk poets to emerge from the African-American experience in Texas.« When he died in 1982 he had recorded well over 600 'audio snapshots'. From his prolific output this Candid session ranks amongst his finest and most intimate work.




    Musicians:



    • Lightnin' Hopkins (vocal, guitar, piano)




    Recording: November 1960 at Nola Penthouse Studios, New York City, by Bob d'Orleans

    Production: Nat Hentoff




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Take It Easy
    2. Mighty Crazy
    3. Your Own Fault, Baby, To Treat Me The Way You Do
    4. Ive Had My Fun If I Dont Get Well No More
    5. The Trouble Blues
    6. Lightnins Piano Boogie

    7. Wonder Why
    8. Mister Charlie

    9. Black Cat
    Lightin' Hopkins
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure) Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
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    x

    Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure)

    The material - many of the Dylan classics - is unsurpassable. Her voice is at its zenith, young, supple - neither undisciplined (as in her 1st records) nor the later, low vibrato warble. There is none of the self-conscious and silly Dylan vocal imitation found in Baez's later recording. Where Dylan's own singing is wonderfully raw and rough, Baez is clear and pure. Both are great for me, but very, very different from each other. These lovely renditions are like no one else's. Just pure Joan in her finest voice.



    She is backed here by several of the very best of '70s Nashville session musicians (pickers). Some folks think of Nashville sidemen as inevitably bound up with Country Music. While this is not counter-country, it fits much more into folk - as the names Dylan and Baez rightly connote.



    One Too Many Mornings is too often overlooked among Dylan's compositions, and this is among the best renditions I've heard. The full-length, unhurried treatment Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowland is spell-binding and satisfying. Perhaps my favorite, though, is the subtle and poignant Spanish Boots of Spanish Leather. Dylan's lyrical genius is fully manifest, in his gorgeous melody and Joan Baez's a wonderful performance.
    For many of us who listened both then and recently, this pristine work inevitably reminds us how much has aged in the decades since this earlier era - also recaptured so vividly in Dylan's own Chronicles. These are timely works, both for reminiscence and to introduce newbies to the non-acid experiences that stirred an earlier generation. But regardless of any social import, this is simply beautiful poetry and music.



    Musicians:



    • Joan Baez (guitar, vocal)

    • Fred Carter (mandolin)

    • Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (keyboards)

    • Stephen Stills, Pete Drake, Harold Rugg (guitar)

    • Tommy Jackson, Johnny Gimble (violin)




    Recording: 1968 by Selby Cofeen

    Production: Maynard Solomon



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Love Minus Zero/No Limit
    2. North Country Blues
    3. You Ain't Going Nowhere
    4. Drifter's Escape
    5. I Pity the Poor Immigrant

    6. Tears of Rage
    7. Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands
    8. Love Is Just a Four-Letter Word
    9. I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine

    10. The Walls of Redwing
    11. Dear Landlord
    12. One Too Many Mornings
    13. I Shall Be Released
    14. Boots of Spanish Leather
    15. Walkin' Down the Line

    16. Restless Farewell
    Joan Baez
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Texas Flood (Pure Pleasure) Texas Flood (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $44.99
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    x

    Texas Flood (Pure Pleasure)

    It's hard to overestimate the impact Stevie Ray Vaughan's debut, Texas Flood, had upon its release in 1983. At that point, blues was no longer hip, the way it was in the '60s. Texas Flood changed all that, climbing into the Top 40 and spending over half a year on the charts, which was practically unheard of for a blues recording. Vaughan became a genuine star and, in doing so, sparked a revitalization of the blues. This was a monumental impact, but his critics claimed that, no matter how prodigious Vaughan's instrumental talents were, he didn't forge a distinctive voice; instead, he wore his influences on his sleeve, whether it was Albert King's pinched yet muscular soloing or Larry Davis' emotive singing. There's a certain element of truth in that, but that was sort of the point of Texas Flood. Vaughan didn't hide his influences; he celebrated them, pumping fresh blood into a familiar genre.



    When Vaughan and Double Trouble cut the album over the course of three days in 1982, he had already played his set lists countless times; he knew how to turn this material inside out or goose it up for maximum impact. The album is paced like a club show, kicking off with Vaughan's two best self-penned songs, Love Struck Baby and Pride and Joy, then settling into a pair of covers, the slow-burning title track and an exciting reading of Howlin' Wolf's Tell Me, before building to the climax of Dirty Pool and I'm Crying. Vaughan caps the entire thing with Lenny, a lyrical, jazzy tribute to his wife.




    Musicians:



    • Texas Flood - Stevie Ray Vaughan (g, voc)

    • Tommy Shannon (b)

    • Chris "Whipper" Layton (dr)




    Recording: November 1982 at Down Town Studios, Los Angeles, and Riverside Sound, Austin (Texas) by Richard Mullen / September 1983 at The Palace, Hollywood, California

    Production: Stevie Ray Vaughan, Richard Mullen & Double Troubledeutsch



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Love Struck Baby
    2. Pride And Joy
    3. Texas Flood
    4. Tell Me
    5. Testify
    6. Rude Mood
    7. Mary Had A Little Lamb
    8. Dirty Pool
    9. Im Cryin
    10. Lenny


    Bonus Tracks:
    11. SRV Speaks
    12. Tin Pan Alley (AKA Roughest Place In Town)
    13. Testify (live)
    14. Mary Had A Little Lamb (live)
    15. Wham! (live)

    Stevie Ray Vaughan
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Alice's Restaurant (Pure Pleasure) Alice's Restaurant (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Alice's Restaurant (Pure Pleasure)

    Although he'd been a fixture on the East Coast folk circuit for several years, Arlo Guthrie did not release his debut album until mid-1967. A majority of the attention directed at Alice's Restaurant focuses on the epic 18-plus-minute title track, which sprawled over the entire A-side of the long-player. However, it is the other half-dozen Guthrie compositions that provide an insight into his uniformly outstanding, yet astoundingly overlooked, early sides on Warner Bros. Although arguably not 100 percent factual, Alice's Restaurant Massacree -- which was recorded in front of a live audience -- is rooted in a series of real incidents.


    This decidedly anti-establishment saga of garbage dumps closed on Thanksgiving, good ol' Officer Obie, as well as Guthrie's experiences with the draft succeeds not only because of the unusual and outlandish situations that the hero finds himself in; it is also his underdog point of view and sardonic delivery that maximize the effect in the retelling. In terms of artistic merit, the studio side is an equally endowed effort containing six decidedly more traditional folk-rock compositions. Among the standouts are the haunting Chilling Of The Evening, which is given an arrangement perhaps more aptly suited to a Jimmy Webb/Glen Campbell collaboration.


    There is a somewhat dated charm in Ring-Around-a-Rosy Rag, a sly, uptempo, and hippie-friendly bit of jug band nostalgia. I'm Going Home is an underrated minor-chord masterpiece that is not only reminiscent of Roger McGuinn's Ballad of Easy Rider, but also spotlights a more sensitive and intricate nature to Guthrie's craftsmanship. Also worth mentioning is the first installment of The Motorcycle Song -- which was updated and discussed further on the live self-titled follow-up release Arlo (1968) -- notable for the extended discourse on the 'significance of the pickle'.

    Musicians:



    • Arlo Guthrie (vocal, guitar)




    Recording: 1967

    Production: Fred Hellerman & Al Brown



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Alice's Restaurant Masacree
    2. Chilling Of the Evening
    3. Ring-Around-A-Rosy Rag
    4. Now and Then
    5. I'm Going Home
    6. The Motorcycle Song
    7. Highway In the Wind
    Arlo Guthrie
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Couldn't Stand The Weather (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Couldn't Stand The Weather (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Couldn't Stand The Weather (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress)

    With his astonishingly accomplished guitar playing, Stevie Ray Vaughan ignited the blues revival of the '80's. Vaughan drew equally from bluesmen like Albert King, Otis Rush, and Muddy Waters and rock & roll players like Jimi Hendrix and Lonnie Mack, as well as the stray jazz guitarist like Kenny Burrell, developing a uniquely eclectic and fiery style that sounded like no other guitarist, regardless of genre. Vaughan bridged the gap between blues and rock like no other artist had since the late '60s. For the next seven years, Stevie Ray was the leading light in American blues, consistently selling out concerts while his albums regularly went gold. His tragic death in 1990 only emphasized his influence in blues and American rock & roll.

    Musicians:



    • Stevie Ray Vaughan (vocal, guitar)

    • Jimmie Vaughan (guitar)

    • Stan Harrison (tenor saxophone)

    • Tommy Shannon (bass)

    • Chris "Whipper" Layton, Fran Christina (drums)



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / standard sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    Side 1
    1. Scuttlebuttin'
    2. Couldn't Stand The Weather
    3. Things That I Used To Do


    Side 2
    4. Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)
    5. Cold Shot


    Side 3
    6. Tin Pan Alley
    7. Honey Bee
    8. Stang's Swang


    Side 4
    9. SRV Speaks
    10. Hide Away
    11. Look at Little Sister
    12. Give Me Back My Wig
    13. Come On (Pt.3)

    Stevie Ray Vaughan
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Consummation (Pure Pleasure) Consummation (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Consummation (Pure Pleasure)

    Of the many albums recorded by the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra, this was the greatest. This set introduced Jones' best-known composition, A Child Is Born, and also has a colourful rendition of his sly Tiptoe, and finds the big band ripping the roof off during the lengthy and very exciting Fingers. The all-star cast (which includes flugelhornist Jones, drummer Lewis, trumpeter Marvin Stamm, trombonist Jimmy Knepper, tenor great Billy Harper, the reeds of Jerome Richardson, Jerry Dodgion and Eddie Daniels, keyboardist Roland Hanna, and bassist Richard Davis, among others) is well served by Thad Jones' inventive and swinging arrangements. A classic.




    Musicians:



    • Thad Jones (trumpet, fluegel horn, conductor)

    • Billy Harper (tenor saxophone, flute)

    • Jimmy Knepper (trombone)

    • Jerome Richardson (alto saxophone, soprano saxophone, flute)

    • Joe Farrell (basson, clarinet)

    • Roland Hanna (electric piano, piano)

    • David Spinozza (guitar)

    • Mel Lewis (drums)




    Recording: January and May 1970 at A&R Studios, New York City, by Don Hahn

    Production: Sonny Lester



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1.  Dedication

    2.  It Only Happens Every Time

    3.  Tiptoe

    4.  A Child Is Born

    5.  Us


    1.  Ahunk Ahunk

    2.  Fingers

    3.  Consummation

    Thad Jones
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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