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  • Ellington Uptown (Pure Pleasure) Ellington Uptown (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Ellington Uptown (Pure Pleasure)

    Even back in the early '50s, Columbia Records took Duke Ellington seriously enough to place this album on its prestigious Masterworks label, heretofore reserved mostly for highbrow classical music and Broadway shows. Also, this LP explodes the critical line that the early '50s was a relatively fallow period for the Duke; any of these smoking, concert-length tracks will torpedo that notion. The young Louis Bellson was powering the Ellington band at that time, and his revolutionary double-bass drum technique and rare ability to build coherent drum solos are put to astounding use on his self-penned leadoff track, Skin Deep, which was quite a demonstration piece for audiophiles at the time. Old favorites from the Ellington hit parade are given extended treatments, with singer Betty Roche taking the A-Train for a bebop-flavored ride, The Mooche spotlighting clarinetists Jimmy Hamilton and Russell Procope, and Ellington's boogie-woogie piano kicking off a super-charged Perdido for trumpeter Clark Terry. The centerpiece of the disc is a sharply drawn, idiomatically swinging, probably unbeatable performance of A Tone Parallel To Harlem that lays waste to any of the 'symphonic' versions that turn up frequently at pop concerts. Another feature of this record is the great sound quality, a benefit of being entrusted to Columbia's best engineers.



    Musicians:



    • Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney, Russell Procope (saxophone)

    • William Anderson, Clark Terry (trumpet)

    • Quentin Jackson, Britt Woodman (trombone)

    • Billy Strayhorn, Duke Ellington (piano)

    • Betty Roche (vocal)
    • Wendell Marshall (bass)

    • Louis Bellson (drums)





    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Skin Deep
    2. The Mooche
    3. Take the A Train
    4. A Tone Parallel
    5. Perdido
    Duke Ellington
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Blue Rose (Pure Pleasure) Blue Rose (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Blue Rose (Pure Pleasure)

    One of Rosemary Clooney's best records, and one of Duke's more accessible offerings, combined on one LP. The recorded output of the 1950's didn't get much more satisfying than this. Duke's music was always very sophisticated and this time it's even more obvious with a presence of such a talented singer as Rosemary Clooney. The songs are marvelous and she sounds young, fresh and sexy (ladylike sexy). In Blue Rose, not only are Clooney's vocals outstanding, but the arrangements are some of the prettiest of jazz.



    The band swings simply and sweetly, though still thoroughly in the Duke style. As if to make the point that the band is the 'other' star of this recording, there's one instrumental here - Passion Flower (Johnny Hodges on sax never sounded more sure of himself). Its inclusion in the program, without a vocal from Clooney, is at first bizarre - but seems to make sense within the context of the album.



    The fascinating album notes explain why and how separate tracks for Rosemary Clooney and Duke Ellington's orchestra had to be laid down. One would never realize that singer and orchestra were not together. They are totally in sync. This is not big, belting jazz; this is sophisticated, late night, intimate singing and playing. This is one of the most memorable pairings of a 'popular' singer with a jazz giant; ranking with the first Sinatra-Basie album and the Coltrane-Hartman session.




    Musicians:



    • Rosemary Clooney (vocal)

    • Duke Ellington (piano, arranger)

    • Billy Strayhorn (arranger)

    • Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope (alto saxophone)

    • Clark Terry, Cat Anderson (trumpet)

    • Gordon Jackson (trombone)

    • Jimmy Woode (bass)

    • Sam Woodyard (drums)




    Recording: January and February 1956




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Hey Baby
    2. Sophisticated Lady

    3. Me and You
    4. Passion Flower
    5. I Let A Song Go Out Of My Heart
    6. Grievin
    7. Blue Rose
    8. Im Checkin OutGoombye

    9. I Got It Bad
    10. Mood Indigo
    Rosemary Clooney & Duke Ellington
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sugar (Pure Pleasure) Sugar (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Sugar (Pure Pleasure)

    If ever there were a record that both fit perfectly and stood outside the CTI Records' stable sound, it is Sugar by Stanley Turrentine. Turrentine, a veteran of the soul-jazz scene since the '50s, was accompanied by a who's who of groove players, including guitarist George Benson, Lonnie Liston Smith on electric piano, Freddie Hubbard on trumpet, bassist Ron Carter, organist Butch Cornell, and drummer Billy Kaye, among others. The title track is a deep soul blues workout with a swinging backbeat and the rhythm section fluidly streaming through fours and eights as Benson, Hubbard, and Turrentine begin slowly and crank up the heat, making the pace and stride of the cut simmer then pop - especially in Hubbard's solo. This is truly midnight blue, and the party's at the point of getting really serious or about to break up. By the time Benson picks up his break, full of slick, shiny, warm arpeggios, the seams are bursting and couples are edging into corners. Butch Cornell's Sunshine Alley is a solid, funky groover, paced by organ and double fours by Kaye. Turrentine and Hubbard stride into the melody and keep the vamp in the pocket, riding out past the blues line into a tag that just revs the thing up even further. But the big surprise is in the final track, one of the most solidly swinging, from-the-gut emotional rides of John Coltrane's Impressions ever taken. Turrentine is deep inside his horn, ringing out in legato with everything he has - and it is considerable. Ron Carter's bass playing flows through the modal interludes, creating a basis for some beautifully intervallic invention by Benson and Smith by building a series of harmonic bridges through the mode to solos. It's hard to believe this is Turrentine, yet is could be no one else. If jazz fans are interested in Turrentine beyond the Blue Note period - and they should be - this is a heck of a place to listen for satisfaction.



    Musicians:



    • Freddie Hubbard (trumpet)

    • Stanley Turrentine (tenor saxophone)

    • Lonnie Liston Smith (electric piano)

    • Butch Cornell (organ)

    • George Benson (guitar), Ron Carter (bass), Billy Kaye (drums)

    • Richard Pablo Landrum (conga)




    Recording: November 1970 at Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA

    Production: Creed Taylor



    Format: 1LP 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Sugar
    2. Sunshine Alley
    3. Impressions
    4. Sugar (previously unreleased, live, bonus track)
    Stanley Turrentine
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sweetenings (Pure Pleasure) Sweetenings (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Sweetenings (Pure Pleasure)

    Harry 'Sweets' Edison, a smooth and suave trumpeter, was a cohort of orchestra leader Count Basie, a favourite of bandleader Nelson Riddle, and a noted backup artist for the most prominent vocalists of his time. Edison, with his energetic yet reticent blowing style, bridged a genre gap between the early classic jazz sound of Louis Armstrong and modern bebop modes. Edison, who played equally well in both styles, had a special talent for sustaining his trumpet notes and injecting each single tone with expression and soul never heard before or after.


    The special quality of his trumpet playing earned him the nickname 'Sweets' because of the sweetness of the tones. Likewise his ability to control the tone of his trumpet brought him to the forefront as a session musician, playing accompaniments for the most respected vocalists of his time.


    Edison was a true pioneer of jazz. An old-time homespun boy, born in Columbus, Ohio, he never knew with certainty even the year of his birth. According to his best knowledge, he was born in 1919, although some sources list the date as early as 1915. Edison knew even less about his own father, a Native American of the Hopi (Apache) tribe and a drifter who stayed only a few weeks with Edison's mother before taking to the road and was rarely heard from afterward. Edison spent his early years with an uncle, who was a coal miner and a farmer, in Louisville, Kentucky. It was Edison's uncle who taught the boy to play the pump organ and to play scales on an old cornet. Edison, who also listened to his uncle's records, was especially inspired by the music of Louis Armstrong and Bessie Smith.


    Harry Sweets Edison added something special to any date in which he took part, but these 1958 sessions he led for Roulette are especially enjoyable. Joined by either Jimmy Jones or Kenny Drew on piano and Joe Benjamin or John Simmons on bass, along with tenor saxophonist Jimmy Forrest and drummer Charlie Persip, Edison's trumpet swings effortlessly through a batch of standards and originals.


    The loping blues Centerpiece became a classic jazz composition, recorded by numerous jazz artists, but this was its debut appearance on LP. Jive at Five dates from his years with Count Basie and finds the band sticking to an accompanying role in this swinging but brief arrangement. Edison utilizes a mute in the gently swinging Louisiana, while he showboats just a bit in a brief take of It Happened in Monterey. While this record might have offered a little more variety by giving solo space to some of the talented sidemen present, this long out of print LP is well worth acquiring.



    Musicians:



    • Harry Edison (trumpet)

    • Jimmy Forrest (tenor saxophone)

    • Jimmy Jones (piano)

    • Joe Benjamint (bass)

    • John Simmons (bass)

    • Charlie Persip (drums)



    Recording: November 1958 in New York
    Production: Teddy Reig




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Centerpiece
    2. Candy
    3. Jive At Five
    4. Imagination
    5. Louisana
    6. Harriet
    7. It Happened In Monterey
    8. If I Had You
    9. Paradise
    10. Indiana
    11. Pussy Willow
    12. Sweetenings
    Harry Sweets Edison
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Lady Day (Pure Pleasure) Lady Day (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Lady Day (Pure Pleasure)

    Excerpt from George Avakian's notes on the album sleeve:



    When planning this album, I had a hellish time trying to choose what I thought were the absolute cream of Billie Holiday. In the course of this wrestling, it struck me that not only were Billie's vocals incredibly perfect, but that I could not remember a single instance of anyone playing a bad solo or even a bad phrase among the hundred or more performances I had to choose from in the golden period of her work. Checking over records (which was almost unnecessary, because I could still remember them almost note for note) was a rather beautiful and somewhat shattering experience. Jazz, a product of so many things - musical evolution, the social scene of a particular time, the economic atmosphere of the moment, what somebody had for breakfast that day - and none of those tings will ever come together again as they did when these records were made.



    Musicians:



    • Billie Holiday (vocal)

    • Ben Webster, Lester Young (tenor saxophone)

    • Johnny Hodges (alto saxophone)

    • Roy Eldridge, Buck Clayton (trumpet)

    • Benny Goodman, Art Shaw (clarinet)

    • John Truehart (guitar)

    • Teddy Wilson (piano)

    • John Kirby (bass)

    • Cozy Cole, Joe Jones (drums)




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Miss Brown To You
    2. I Wished On the Moon
    3. What A Little Moonlight Can Do
    4. If You Were Mine
    5. Summertime
    6. Billie's Blues
    7. I Must Have That Man
    8. Foolin' Myself
    9. Easy Living
    10. Me, Myself and I
    11. A Sailboat In the Moonlight
    12. I Cried For You
    Billie Holiday
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Boogie With Canned Heat (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale) Boogie With Canned Heat (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $34.99 $26.24 Save $8.75 (25%)

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    Boogie With Canned Heat (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale)

    This is Canned Heat's second album and definitely their finest. Not one weak track on the entire album. If you like the Blues, Rock, and an oldies flavour you cannot go wrong with this. Also, all the band members are featured in terrific solo parts.




    Musicians:



    • Bob Hite (vocal)

    • Alan Wilson (vocal, guitar, harmonica)

    • Henry Vestine (guitar)

    • Larry Taylor (bass)

    • Adolfo de la Parra (drums)




    Recording: 1968 in Liberty Studios, Los Angeles

    Production: Dallas Smith



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Evil Woman
    2. My Crime
    3. On The Road Again
    4. World In A Jug
    5. Turpentine Moan
    6. Whiskey Headed Woman #2
    7. Amphetamine Annie
    8. An Owl Song
    9. Marie Laveau
    10. Fried Hockey Boogie

    Canned Heat
    $34.99 $26.24 Save $8.75 (25%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP- Sealed Buy Now
  • Hooker 'N Heat (Pure Pleasure) Hooker 'N Heat (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Hooker 'N Heat (Pure Pleasure)

    When this two-LP set was initially released in January 1971, Canned Heat was back to its R&B roots. Sporting a slightly revised personnel with the return of Henry 'Sunflower' Vestine and the incorporation of Antonio 'Tony' de la Barreda on bass, a highly skilled constituent of Aldolfo de la Parra on drums. Sadly, it would also be the final effort to include co-founder Alan 'Blind Owl' Wilson, who passed away in September 1970. Hooker 'n Heat (1971) is a low-key affair split between unaccompanied solo John Lee Hooker tunes, collaborations between Hooker and Wilson, as well as five full-blown confabs between Hooker and Heat.



    The full-fledged collaborations shine as both parties unleash some of their finest respective work. While Canned Heat get top bill - probably as it was the group's record company that sprung for Hooker 'n Heat - make no mistake, as Hooker steers the combo with the same gritty and percussive guitar leads that have become his trademark. The epic Boogie Chillen No. 2 stretches over 11-and-a-half minutes and is full of the same swagger as the original, with the support of Canned Heat igniting the verses and simmering on the subsequent instrumental breaks with all killer and no filler.



    Musicians:



    • John Lee Hooker (guitar, vocal)

    • Alan Wilson (piano, harmonica)

    • Henry Vestine (guitar)

    • Antonio de la Barreda (bass)

    • Adolfo de la Parra (drums)




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Messin' With the Hook
    2. The Feelin' Is Gone
    3. Send Me Your Pillow
    4. Sittin' Here Thinkin'
    5. Meet Me in the Bottom
    6. Alimonia Blues
    7. Driftin' Blues
    8. You Talk Too Much
    9. Burnin' Hell
    10. Bottle Up and Go
    11. The World Today
    12. I Got My Eyes On You
    13. Whiskey and Wimmen
    14. Just You and Me
    15. Let's Make It
    16. Peavine
    17. Boogie Chillen No. 2
    John Lee Hooker
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Quicksilver Messenger Service (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale) Quicksilver Messenger Service (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $34.99 $26.24 Save $8.75 (25%)

    Buy Now
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    Quicksilver Messenger Service (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale)

    Quicksilver Messenger Service's debut effort was a little more restrained and folky than some listeners had expected, given their reputation for stretching out in concert. While some prefer the mostly live Happy Trails, this self-titled collection is inarguably their strongest set of studio material, with the accent on melodic folk-rock. Highlights include their cover of folksinger Hamilton Camp's Pride of Man, probably their best studio track; Light Your Windows, probably the group's best original composition; and founding member Dino Valenti's Dino's Song (Valenti himself was in jail when the album was recorded). Gold And Silver is their best instrumental jam, and the 12-minute The Fool reflects some of the best and worst traits of the psychedelic era.



    Musicians:



    • John Cipollina, Gary Duncan (guitar, vocal)

    • David Frieberg (bass, vocal)

    • Greg Elmore (drums, percussion)




    Production: Nick Gravenites, Harvey Brooks & Pete Welding



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Pride Of Man
    2. Light Your Windows
    3. Dino's Song
    4. Gold And Silver
    5. It's Been Too Long
    6. The Fool
    Quicksilver Messenger Service
    $34.99 $26.24 Save $8.75 (25%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Deep In The Night (Pure Pleasure) Deep In The Night (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Deep In The Night (Pure Pleasure)

    Originally released on Warners Brothers to scant acclaim in 1978, this Jerry Wexler-produced masterpiece finds James in astounding voice with a batch of great material to apply her massive interpretive powers to. The band, including the cream of the late-'70s Los Angeles session hot-shots (Cornell Dupree, Jeff Porcaro, Chuck Rainey, Plas Johnson, Jim Horn), lays it down soulful and simple and the result is a modern-day R&B classic. Highlights abound throughout, but special attention must be turned to James' takes on Only Women Bleed and the Eagles' Take It to the Limit.



    Musicians:



    • Etta James (vocal)

    • Plas Johnson, Jim Horn (saxophone)

    • Larry Carlton, Cornell Dupree, Brian Ray (guitar)

    • Keith Johnson (electric piano)

    • Richard Tee (piano)

    • Chuck Rainey (bass)

    • Tom Roady (percussion)

    • Jeff Porcaro (drums)



    Recording: 1978 by Bruce Robb and Joe Chicarelli

    Production: Jerry Wexler



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Laying Beside You
    2. Piece Of My Heart
    3. Only Women Bleed
    4. Take It To The Limit
    5. Deep In The Night
    6. Lovesick Blues
    7. Strange Man
    8. Sugar On The Floor
    9. Sweet Touch Of Love
    10. Blind Girl
    Etta James
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • T. Bone Walker Sings The Blues (Pure Pleasure) T. Bone Walker Sings The Blues (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    T. Bone Walker Sings The Blues (Pure Pleasure)

    T-Bone Walker is one of the all time greats, an innovator and significant influence on just about every blues guitarist who followed. But his musical legacy is also incredibly enjoyable, full of humour as well as invention.



    A man who played the blues with flair, sophistication, technical brilliance and a sense of humour, Aaron Thibeaux Walker was born in Linden, Cass County, of Cherokee Indian descent. His trademark was the cool, telling West Coast licks which emanated from his guitar - there have been few who have done the job better.




    Musicians:



    • Aaron T-Bone Walker (vocal, guitar)

    • Eddie Hutcherson (trumpet)

    • Edward Hale (alto saxophone)

    • Eddie Davis (tenor saxophone)

    • Jim Wynn (tenor saxophone, baritone saxophone)

    • Willard McDaniels (piano)

    • Buddy Woodson, Billy Hadnott (bass)

    • Robert "Snake" Sims (drums)




    Recording: April 1950, August and December 1951, January1952




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Strollin' With Bones
    2. You Don't Love Me
    3. You Don't Understand
    4. Say! Pretty Baby
    5. Tell Me What's the Reason
    6. Blue Mood
    7. The Sun Went Down
    8. Travelin' Blues
    9. Evil Hearted Woman
    10. Cold, Cold Feeling
    11. I Got the Blues Again

    12. Blues Is a Woman
    T. Bone Walker
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Forbidden Fruit (Pure Pleasure) Forbidden Fruit (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Forbidden Fruit (Pure Pleasure)

    To call Nina Simone a jazz singer is to neglect the depth and range of her artistry. A classical pianist, folk singer, protest singer, and songwriter, her arrangements are harmonically rich, varied, and rhythmically experimental, while her voice can go from lounge singer-smooth to raw and exposed in the space of a verse.


    The tracks on Sides 1 & 2 comprise 1961's masterful Forbidden Fruit album. While no session information exists to confirm this, Schackman, Hamilton and White were likely accompanying Nina when she recorded the eleven songs that comprise Sides 3 & 4, seven of which are from the small archive of previously unreleased tracks left in the Colpix vaults; and four of which were included on the Nina's final Colpix release, 1963's "Nina Simone With Strings".


    Features: 



    • 180g Vinyl

    • Double LP

    • Re-mastered by Sean Magee at Abbey Road Studios


    Musicians:



    • Nina Simone, piano, vocals

    • Al Schackman, guitar

    • Chris White, bass

    • Bob Hamilton, drums


     Recorded in New York City, 1961




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    LP 1
    1. Rags and Old Iron
    2. No Good Man
    3. Gin House Blues
    4. I'll Look Around
    5. I Love to Love
    6. Work Song
    7. Where Can I Go Without You
    8. Just Say I Love Him
    9. Memphis In June
    10. Forbidden Fruit


    LP 2
    1. Porgy I Is Your Woman Now
    2. Baubles, Bangles and Beads
    3. Gimme A Pigfoot
    4. Ev'rytime We Say Goodbye
    5. Spring Is Here
    6. Lonesome Valley
    7. Golden Earrings
    8. My Ship
    9. 'Tain't Nobody's Biz-ness If I Do
    10. Try A Little Tenderness
    11. Od Yesh Homa

    Nina Simone
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Right Time (Pure Pleasure) The Right Time (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Right Time (Pure Pleasure)

    I first heard Etta James as a young teenager when she had a hit with Tell Mama, a tune that has easily stood the test of time. She recorded this album a quarter-century later and sounded even better.

    For The Right Time she returns to the Muscle Shoals studio where she recorded Tell Mama, this time with producer Jerry Wexler, and it's an outstanding match. She hits nary a forced or false note and is backed with a stellar band that includes saxophonist Hank Crawford, guitarist Steve Cropper and bassist Willie Weeks. They plow ahead like a great offensive line blocking for an all-star running back -- one who isn't afraid to lower the shoulder and knock somebody over.

    There's plenty of manufactured emotion on records, but you won't find any of it here. Etta just rocks naturally. It's like sitting next to a seasoned story teller in full command of the narrative. Nothing for you to do but sit back, close your eyes and listen.

    A sign of great singers for me is how they put a stamp on songs that have been done many times. In that regard, Etta makes Love and Happiness and Ninety And A Half Won't Do her own. She tears up The Night Time Is the Right Time with the help of Crawford's sax. Of course she has the blues well covered, my personal favorite being Down Home Blues, and flashes her humorous side with the trash-talking Wet Match. She hits any note she wants without straining and with total conviction.

    But all the songs are top-notch. The best advice for anyone reading this is to just pick up the album and discover the old-school glory of Etta James. - Tyler Smith

    Musicians:

    • Etta James (vocal)
    • Lucky Peterson (organ, guitar)
    • Steve Cropper, Doug Bartenfeld (guitar)
    • Hank Crawford (alto saxophone)
    • Jim Horn (bassoon)
    • Gary Armstrong (trumpet)
    • Kirk 'Jelly Roll' Johnson (harmonica)
    • Clayton Ivey (piano)
    • Frank Crawford (synthesizer)
    • David Hood(bass)
    • Steve Ferrone, Roger Hawkins (drums)

    About Pure Pleasure

    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.

    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.

    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.

    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.

    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.

    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. I Sing The Blues
    2. Love And Happiness
    3. Evening Of Love
    4. Wet Match
    5. You're Taking Up Another Man's Place
    6. Give It Up (Duet With Steve Winwood)
    7. Let It Rock
    8. Ninety Nine And A Half (Won't Do)
    9. You've Got Me
    10. Nighttime Is The Right Time
    11. Down Home Blues
    Etta James
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Chicago/The Blues/Today! (Pure Pleasure) Chicago/The Blues/Today! (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $99.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Chicago/The Blues/Today! (Pure Pleasure)

    In early 1966, blues history was made with the issuance of a three-volume set of new recordings produced by blues historian Samuel Charters. This series was known as Chicago/The Blues/Today! and the release sent shock waves through the world of rock & roll. Every artist on the three volumes had recorded before (some, like Otis Rush and Junior Wells, had actually seen small hits on the R&B charts), but these recordings were largely their introduction to a newer -- and predominately white -- album-oriented audience. These recordings have stayed in print and have been reasonably good sellers over the years since their original release, all coming out on compact disc. This new packaging puts all three volumes together, but with no bonus tracks, as no extras were recorded for these sessions.



    A plus in the new packaging, is that it features a nice booklet with detailed, updated notes from Charters, a nice appreciation from Ed Ward, and absolutely eye-boggling session photos taken by Charters' wife, Ann. Even if you still have the original vinyl or CDs, this is one of the times when it would be best to spend the dough and add this one to your collection, because blues records seldom come as important, innovative, or just plain pleasurable to listen to as this set. File under 'essential'.




    Musicians:



    • J.B. Hutto

    • Junior Wells

    • Otis Spann

    • Otis Rush

    • Jimmy Cotton

    • Johnny Shines Blues Band

    • Johnny Young's South Side Blues Band

    • Homesick James

    • and Big Walter Horton's Blues Harp Band with Memphis Charlie Musselwhite




    Recording: 1965 at RCA Studios, Chicago

    Production: Samuel Chartersdeutsch



    Format: 3LPs 33rpm / Box, booklet



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    LP1
    1. Help Me (A Tribute to Sonny Boy Williamson)
    2. It Hurts Me Too
    3. Messin' with the Kid
    4. Vietcong Blues
    5. All Night Long
    6. Going Ahead
    7. Please Help
    8. Too Much Alcohol
    9. Married Woman Blues
    10. That's the Truth
    11. Marie
    12. Burning Fire
    13. S P Blues
    14. Sometimes I Wonder
    15. Spann's Stomp


    LP2
    1. Cotton Crop Blues
    2. The Blues Keep Falling
    3. Love Me or Leave
    4. Rocket 88
    5. West Helena Blues
    6. Everything's Gonna Turn Out Allright
    7. It's a Mean Old World
    8. I Can't Quit You Baby
    9. Rock
    10. It's My Own Fault
    11. Dust my Broom
    12. Somebody Been Talkin'
    13. Set a Date
    14. So Mean to Me


    LP3
    1. One More Time
    2. Kid Man Blues
    3. My Black Mare
    4. Stealin' Back
    5. I Got Mine In Time
    6. Tighten Up On It
    7. Dynaflow Blues
    8. Black Spider Blues
    9. Layin' Down My Shoes and Clothes
    10. If I Get Lucky
    11. Rockin' My Boogie
    12. Mr. Boweevil
    13. Hey Hey

    Various Artists
    $99.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Sweet Sister Funk (Pure Pleasure) Sweet Sister Funk (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Sweet Sister Funk (Pure Pleasure)

    From the mid to late 60's the producer Sonny Lester was at the helm of some of the period's most significant jazz music (Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Orchestra, Chick Corea, Duke Ellington's 70th birthday concert) and also some of the genre's biggest hits (mostly from organist Jimmy Mcgriff). With the folding of the Solid State label in 1971 Sonny Lester formed the aptly named Groove Merchant label (named after the tune Jerome Richardson wrote for the Jones-Lewis Orchestra). He then produced some of the periods most notable soul/jazz, jazz/fusion from the likes of McGriff, Richard Groove Holmes, Reuben Wilson, Lonnie Smith to name but a few.



    This gem of an album from Ramon Morris, and one of the hardest to find on Groove Merchant, was recorded during what many people would consider to be the classic period for this particular brand of jazz/funk/soul/fusion. It was recorded not long after he'd spent time with Art Blakey as a Jazz Messenger appearing on his 1972 Prestige album Child's Dance along with Stanley Clarke and Woody Shaw. He then also recorded on the Woody Shaw album, also from 1972, Song Of Songs.



    He now teaches at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pa.



    Musicians:



    • Ramon Morris (tenor saxophone)

    • Albert Dailey (electric piano)

    • Mickey Bass (bass)

    • Mickey Roker (drums)

    • Cecil Bridgewater (trumpet)

    • Lloyd Davis (guitar)

    • Tony Waters (conga)




    Recording: 1972

    Production: Sonny Lester



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. First Come, First Serve
    2. Wijinia
    3. Sweet Sister Funk

    4. Sweat
    5. Don't Ask Me
    6. Lord Sideways
    7. People Make the World Go Round
    Ramon Morris
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Cosmic Scene (Pure Pleasure) The Cosmic Scene (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Cosmic Scene (Pure Pleasure)

    Still riding the success of his triumphant concert at the 1956 Newport Jazz Festival, Duke Ellington in 1958 decided to reduce his touring orchestra to a nonet dubbed the Spacemen, and recorded this lone project with them for the Columbia label. Perhaps inspired by the first orbiting satellites, Ellington is not taking cues from George Russell or Sun Ra, whose extraterrestrial inspirations led them to even more progressive paths. This large ensemble is playing mostly standards, but the arrangements and solos carve an integrated yet elasticized concept that allows for a more expanded role for the ensemble's trombonists Quentin 'Butter' Jackson, John Sanders, and Britt Woodman, and select soloists. One in the solo spotlight is Clark Terry on flugelhorn exclusively, putting his fabled trumpet aside. The classic material presented includes clarinetist Jimmy Hamilton's features Avalon and Early Autumn, the slinky stripper pole blues version of St. Louis Blues with Ellington's piano taking the lead, and a version of Body & Soul, with tenor saxophonist Paul Gonsalves completely extrapolating and re-harmonizing the tune. There's a modified Perdido, an animated and perky Midnight Sun that deviates from any other slow and lugubrious version of the ballad, and Jones a real good swinger. There are two originals; the blues bass of Jimmy Woode and the 'bones with plentiful piano from Duke infusing Bass-Ment, and one of the more delightful of all of Ellington's book, the poppin' and boppin' Spacemen, a bright happy horn chart led by Terry that is one of the more distinctive Ellington numbers of this time period. It comes highly recommended.



    Musicians:



    • Paul Gonsalves (tenor saxophone)

    • Clark Terry (fluegel horn)

    • Britt Woodman, John Sanders, Quentin Jackson (trombone)

    • Jimmy Hamilton (clarinet)

    • Duke Ellington (piano)

    • Jimmy Wood (bass)

    • Sam Woodyard (drums)



    Recording: April 1958 at Columbia 30th Street Studio, New York




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Avalon
    2. Body And Soul
    3. Bass-ment
    4. Early Autumn
    5. Jones
    6. Perdido
    7. St. Louis Blues
    8. Spacemen
    9. Midnight Sun
    10. Take The A Train
    Duke Ellington
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Penthouse Serenade (Pure Pleasure) Penthouse Serenade (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Penthouse Serenade (Pure Pleasure)

    The year after he had formally disbanded his trio to turn his attention to vocal pop music, Nat 'King' Cole reversed himself and went into the studio with guitarist John Collins, bassist Charlie Harris, and drummer Bunny Shawker and recorded the eight-song 10 LP Penthouse Serenade, a quiet, reflective set of standards like Somebody Loves Me and Laura that he performed instrumentally at the piano. The album confirmed that, whatever success he might be having as a singer, he hadn't lost his touch. In 1955, with the 12 LP gaining dominance, Cole went back into the studio with Collins, Harris, and drummer Lee Young (Lester Young's brother) and cut four more songs to create a 12-track reissue of Penthouse Serenade that was his first full-length LP release. In 1998, Capitol Jazz again expanded the album, putting out a 19-track CD version by appending an alternate take of I Surrender Dear from the 1955 session and six tracks recorded with Collins and Harris (and, on most of them, percussionist Jack Costanzo) from January 1952, four of which were previously unreleased. The justification for these inclusions was that they featured the same personnel, and they are interesting in that they include alternate, non-orchestrated versions of Cole hits like Too Young, Walkin' My Baby Back Home, and Unforgettable. But they are not in keeping with the rest of the album in that they are vocal tracks. Nevertheless, it's hard to argue with an album that, over the years, has grown from 23 to 51 minutes in length.



    Musicians:



    • Nat King Cole (piano, vocal)

    • John Collins (guitar)

    • Charlie Harris (bass)

    • Bunny Shawker, Lee Young (drums)

    • Jack Costanzo (percussion)




    Recording: January 1952 at MGM Studios, New York City / July 1952 and July 1955 at Capitol Studios, Los Angeles

    Production: Lee Gillette




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Rose Room
    2. I Surrender, Dear
    3. Somebody Loves Me
    4. It Could Happen To You
    5. Polka Dots And Moonbeams
    6. Laura
    7. If I Should Lose You
    8. Once In A Blue Moon
    9. Don't Blame Me
    10. Penthouse Serenade (When We're Alone)
    11. Little Girl
    12. Down By The Old Mill Stream
    13. Too Marvelous for Words
    14. That's My Girl
    15. Unforgettable
    16. Walkin' My Baby Back Home
    17. Too Young
    18. It's Only a Paper Moon
    Nat King Cole with Billy May Orchestra
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • What's Going On (Pure Pleasure) What's Going On (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    What's Going On (Pure Pleasure)

    In 2006, exactly a year after Katrina, in the aftermath of a vicious natural disaster that displayed the incompetence of the Crescent City's infrastructure, the Army Corps of Engineers, and the Federal Government, they addressed the tragedy in the only way they know how, by re-creating the same kind of bewilderment and anger that Marvin Gaye felt and witnessed in 1971 by issuing their own take on Gaye's classic album What's Goin' On. This is a question that is proved all the more poignant given the efforts of an entire region trying not only to rebuild homes and businesses, but trying to preserve a culture as this recording was released. The Dirty Dozen recruit a number of vocalists to help out on the hinge tunes. The samples of New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin's voice in the aftermath of the hurricane usher in the brass slip-sliding along the dark funky overtones of Gaye's signature tune. Guitarists Doug Bossi and Ben Keeler dig into the groove, as does drummer Terence Higgins and keyboardist/producer Anthony Marinelli, as Chuck D raps the refrain in the context of modern history, the disaster, and the ineptitude and even hostility of a government who wages war and ignores domestic problems. It's a news report from the front lines as the horns cut the melody, the harmony, and the deep, steamy funk groove. What's Happening Brother, closes the funk from the inside, turning the groove back in on itself not only playing the rage, but echoing it in the grain of Bettye LaVette's vocal, which dares to spit out the truth with questions and observations in the pain of a first person narrative. The airy arrangement of Flyin' High (In the Friendly Sky) is nearly mournful, nostalgic for a more innocent time, but is all the more poignant for that longing. The deep tribal drums Mardi Gras Indian-style, with the skronky saxophones, tight guitar groove, and screaming narrative in Save The Children give way to the smoothness of Gaye's melody. It's a bewildered tune, sad with undercurrents of rage. Ivan Neville's arrangement for God Is Love is a stunner, full of deeply imaginative hues and colors and gospel grooves. G. Love helps out on Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology), where the musicality in Gaye's vocal disappears but is supercharged in the horn charts, and Love's vocal sounds confused, displaced, out of time against the instruments. Right On is both militant and celebratory. It's got the funk, but it's also got gospel, rock, and deep soul blaring from the trombones and the repetitive riff in the rest of the brass section. Guru from Gang Starr cuts out from the moody, spectral introduction of Inner City Blues, when Higgins drums play counter to Kirk Joseph's deep blues sousaphone on the bassline. Frustration is everywhere and the horns point fingers to this truth which Guru lays out: that today is the same and perhaps even more so than it was in Gaye's time. The desolation in Gaye's lyric isn't lost but it is fleshed out over the chart so that they are merely the ghosts from the past preaching and exhorting in this new generation. Never has party music sounded so poignant, so utterly damning and hopeful and unbowed. This is the next step in the Homecoming that was a funeral for a friend; this is the aftermath, the sound of angry resurrection coming out with the sun, one where the revolution may be televised but bursts out of the edges in the screen and makes itself known by the medium understood by the people who have to live its realization. With killer grooves that take no prisoners, What's Goin' On is the most fitting tribute yet to Gaye, because not only does it prove the timelessness of the music itself, it echoes that what is indeed goin' on (Gaye's dedication to Detroit as its decline became a reality with no onlookers interested in doing anything) is even more true today than it was in 1971.



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. What's Going On feat. Chuck D
    2. What's Happening Brother feat. Bettye Lavette
    3. Flying High (In the Friendly Skies)
    4. Save the Children
    5. God is Love feat. Ivan Neville
    6. Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)
    7. Right On
    8. Wholy Holy
    9. Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holler)
    The Dirty Dozen Brass Band
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Something In Blue (Pure Pleasure) Something In Blue (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Something In Blue (Pure Pleasure)

    Alan Bates took Thelonious Monk into the studio for his first trio recording in fifteen years with his old sidekick Art Blakey. It has been said often enough that Blakey is the ideal drummer for Monk, and one has only to hear them together again after all this time to realize the truth of the statement. If Blakey at times seems to push the pianist almost too hard, that is in fact the nature of their musical relationship. And, throughout the session, Blakey appeared to be vying with the producer in alternately cajoling and coercing Monk into fulfilling various requests from the small invited audience.



    Musicians:



    • Thelonious Monk (piano)

    • Al McKibbon (bass)

    • Art Blakey (drums)




    Recording: November 1971 at Chappell Studios, London, by John Timperley

    Production: Alan Bates



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Blue Sphere
    2. Hackensack
    3. Nice Work If You Can Get It
    4. Criss Cross
    5. Something in Blue
    6. Evidence
    7. Jackie-ing
    8. Nutty
    Thelonious Monk
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Natch'l Blues (Pure Pleasure) The Natch'l Blues (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    The Natch'l Blues (Pure Pleasure)

    Taj Mahal's second album, recorded in the spring and fall of 1968, opens with more stripped-down Delta-style blues in the manner of his debut, but adds a little more amplification (partly courtesy of Al Kooper on organ) before moving into wholly bigger sound on numbers like She Caught The Katy And Left Me A Mule To Ride and The Cuckoo -- the latter, in particular, features crunchy electric and acoustic guitars and Gary Gilmore playing his bass almost like a lead instrument, like a bluesman's answer to John Entwistle. Most notable, however, may be the two original closing numbers, You Don't Miss Your Water ('Til Your Well Runs Dry) and Ain't That A Lot Of Love, which offer Taj Mahal working in the realm of soul and treading onto Otis Redding territory. This is particularly notable on You Don't Miss Your Water, which achieves the intensity of a gospel performance and comes complete with a Stax/Volt-style horn arrangement by Jesse Ed Davis that sounds more like the real thing than the real thing. Ain't That a Lot of Love, by contrast, is driven by a hard electric guitar sound and a relentless bass part that sounds like a more urgent version of the bassline from the Spencer Davis Group's Gimme Some Lovin'. This LP reissue includes a trio of bonus tracks: a faster-paced rendition of The Cuckoo with a more prominent lead guitar, the slow electric lament New Stranger Blues featuring some good mandolin-style playing on the guitar, and the rocking instrumental Things Are Gonna Work Out Fine, which is a killer showcase for Davis' lead electric guitar and Taj Mahal's virtuosity on the harmonica.




    Musicians:



    • Taj Mahal (harmonica, guitar)

    • Jesse Edwin (guitar, piano, arranger)

    • Al Kooper (organ, piano)

    • Gary Gilmore (bass)

    • Chuck Blackwell, Earl Palmer (drums)




    Recording: May & October 1968

    Production: David Rubinson




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Good Morning Miss Brown Corinna
    2. I Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Steal My Jellyroll
    3. Going Up To The Country, Paint My Mailbox Blue
    4. Done Changed My Way Of Living
    5. The Cuckoo (alternative version)
    6. She Caught The Katy And Left Me A Mule To Ride
    7. The Cuckoo
    8. You Don't Miss Your Water ('Til Your Well Runs Dry)
    9. A Lot Of Love
    10. New Stranger Blues
    11. Things Are Gonna Work Out Fine
    Taj Mahal
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I'm Ready (Pure Pleasure) I'm Ready (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    I'm Ready (Pure Pleasure)

    For the middle album of his Johnny Winter-produced, late-'70s musical trilogy, blues giant Muddy Waters brought a new spirit to some familiar material. Starting with members of Waters' touring band - pianist Pinetop Perkins, bassist Bob Margolin, and drummer Willie Big Eyes Smith - Winter added underrated guitarist (and longtime Waters foil) Jimmy Rogers and extraordinary harp player Big Walter Horton to the mix. The songs recorded for I'm Ready offer a mix of new material and vintage hit singles like the title cut, the mid-'60s jewel Screamin' and Cryin', or the Willie Dixon-penned I'm Your Hoochie Coochie Man. Waters and band provide these well-worn gems with a little new studio polish, but it is with the newer songs that the performers really shine.



    Musicians:



    • Muddy Waters (guitar, vocal)

    • Johnny Winter, Jimmy Rogers (guitar)

    • Walter Horton, Jerry Portnoy (harmonica)

    • "Pine Top" Perkins (piano)

    • Bob Margolin (bass)

    • Willie "Big Eyes" Smith (drums)





    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. I'm Ready
    2. 33 Years
    3. Who Do You Trust
    4. Copper Brown
    5. (I'm Your) Hoochie Coochie Man
    6. Mamie
    7. Rock Me
    8. Screamin' and Cryin'
    9. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl
    Muddy Waters
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Happy Trails (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale) Happy Trails (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $34.99 $26.24 Save $8.75 (25%)

    Buy Now
    x

    Happy Trails (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale)

    Ranked 189/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

    Without question, this follow-up to Quicksilver Messenger Service's self-titled debut release is the most accurate in portraying the band on vinyl in the same light as the group's critically and enthusiastically acclaimed live performances. The album is essentially centered around the extended reworkings of Bo Diddley's Who Do You Love? and Mona, as well as the lesser lauded - yet no less intense - contribution of Gary Duncan's (guitar/vocals) Calvary. This album is the last to feature the original quartet incarnation of QMS. The collective efforts of John Cipollina (guitar/vocals), Greg Elmore (percussion), David Freiberg (bass/vocals), and the aforementioned Duncan retain the uncanny ability to perform with a psychedelic looseness of spirit, without becoming boring or in the least bit pretentious. The side-long epic Who Do You Love? suite is split into an ensemble introduction and coda as well as four distinct sections for the respective bandmembers.



    Musicians:



    • John Cipollina (guitar)

    • Gary Duncan (guitar, vocals)

    • David Freiberg (bass, vocals)

    • Greg Elmore (drums, percussion)




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Who Do You Love - Part 1
    2. When You Love
    3. Where You Love
    4. How You Love
    5. Which Do You Love
    6. Who Do You Love - Part 2
    7. Mona
    8. Maiden of the Cancer Moon
    9. Calvary
    10. Happy Trails
    Quicksilver Messenger Service
    $34.99 $26.24 Save $8.75 (25%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Jazz Messengers (Pure Pleasure) The Jazz Messengers (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
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    x

    The Jazz Messengers (Pure Pleasure)

    The very first edition of Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers was unfortunately short-lived, and as excellent as they were collectively, it was the beginning of a trend for the members of this group to come and go. Unbeknown to Blakey at the time, he would become a champion for bringing talent from the high minor leagues to full-blown jazz-star status, starting with this band featuring Detroit trumpeter Donald Byrd, East coast tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley, and pianist Horace Silver, a jazz legend ever after. It's evident that although there is much cohesion in the group, Byrd's star was on the rise the fastest, and he would leave in a short period, replaced briefly by Clifford Brown, then Kenny Dorham. What is most remarkable in this first recording for the band is how several of these selections have become classic hard bop vehicles, revered and replayed by thousands of bands over time worldwide. Nica's Dream is the best known of them all, typical of the calypso beats Blakey favored at the time, with a singsong, hummable melody led by Byrd that is pure soul personified, and drenched in unrequited blues.


    Musicians:



    • Donald Byrd (trumpet)

    • Hank Mobley (tenor saxophone)

    • Horace Silver (piano)

    • Doug Watkins (bass)

    • Art Blakey (drums)




    Recording: April and May 1956 by Tony Janick at Columbia 30th Street Studio, New York City

    Production: George Avakiandeutsch




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Side A
    1. Infra-Rae

    2. Nica's Dream

    3. It's You or No One


    Side B
    4. Ecaroh

    5. Carol's Interlude

    6. The End of a Love Affair

    7. Hank's Symphony



    Side C
    8. Weird-O*
    9. Ill Wind*
    10. Late Show*


    Side D
    11. Deciphering The Message*
    12. Carol's Interlude


    *Bonus tracks not on original LP.

    Art Blakey
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP -2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Blues Giant (Pure Pleasure) The Blues Giant (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    The Blues Giant (Pure Pleasure)

    Buddy Guy is arguably the most distinctive, electrifying guitarist in Blues history. On a good night, there is no player in the world who can match him. But for all of Guy's talent, unfortunately there are few studio recordings that document his genius. Producers have always wanted him either to sound old-fashioned (i.e., the '50s Chess Chicago Blues sound) or too modern (i.e., some abberation of Jimi or Clapton).



    Buddy was only produced properly one time: and the result is this album. After several mediocre albums in the '60s and '70s, someone finally let Buddy play in the studio with the creative, reckless abandon that, when playing live, has ignited every building in which he has ever played. This IS Buddy Guy!



    Musicians:



    • Buddy Guy (guitar, vocal)

    • Phil Guy (guitar)

    • J. Williams (bass)

    • Ray Allison (drums)



    Recording: October 1979 at Condorcet Studio, Toulouse (France) by Francois Porterie

    Production: Didier Tricard




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. I Smell a Rat
    2. Are You Losing In Your Mind
    3. You've Been Gone Too Long
    4. She Is Out There
    5. Outskirts of Town
    6. When I Left Home
    Buddy Guy
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Dreamsville (Pure Pleasure) Dreamsville (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Dreamsville (Pure Pleasure)

    Vocalist Stacey Kent may or may not be »the greatest ballad singer in half a century«, as her PR claims, but her straightforward renditions of these by-request ballads are not at all generic. What makes them consistently delightful is her unique sound and delivery. There's a certain brassiness, a trumpet-like pointedness, in her voice, as well as a host of endearing idiosyncrasies. Kent knows how to make every tune fit her own musical persona. Dreamsville includes a number of seldom-heard gems, particularly You Are There by Johnny Mandel and Dave Frishberg, You're Looking at Me by Bobby Troup, and the ever-stunning title track by Henry Mancini. She also presents perennial favorites like Polka Dots and Moonbeams and Thanks for the Memory (the latter not exactly a ballad). And although this is Kent's hour all the way, her band provides expert backing and more than a few surprises. The singer's husband, Jim Tomlinson, takes a break from tenor sax to play a sumptuous clarinet solo on Polka Dots. And in the midst of Rodgers & Hart's Little Girl Blue, pianist David Newton, bassist Simon Thorpe, and drummer Jasper Kviberg fall away, entering again only after Tomlinson and Colin Oxley perform a hushed tenor/guitar duet chorus.




    Musicians:



    • Stacey Kent (vocal)

    • Jim Tomlinson (tenor saxophone, clarinet, flute)

    • Colin Oxley (guitar)

    • David Newton (piano)

    • Simon Thorpe (bass)

    • Jasper Kviberg (drums)




    Recording: June 2000 at Curtis Schwartz Studios, Ardingly, UK, by Curtis Schwartz

    Production: Jim Tomlinson



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. I've Got A Crush On You
    2. When Your Lover Has Gone
    3. Isn't It A Pity?
    4. You Are There
    5. Under A Blanket Of Blue

    6. Dreamsville
    7. Polka Dots And Moonbeams

    8. Hushabye Mountain
    9. Little Girl Blue
    10. You're Looking At Me

    11. Violets For Your Furs

    12. Thanks For The Memory
    Stacey Kent
    $34.99
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