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  • Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure) Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure)

    In the intimate ambiance of The Village Gate, Nina Simone made pure magic with her voice and on the keyboard, one Manhattan evening back in 1961. She sang and played with a trio, which featured her favorite guitarist, Al Shackman. We are so fortunate that the moment was captured and recorded.



    I can't really categorize Nina's sound or her music and call her 'just' a fabulous jazz vocalist. Although, she plays extraordinary jazz with her voice, as in Just In Time. She has been often called a musical anomaly, because there is no one category for her work. She was trained as a classical pianist, and in cuts like Bye Bye Blackbird, the complexity of her piano comes through loud and clear. Her folk songs, like the biting House Of The Rising Sun, and Zungo, an African work song, place her at the top of a long list of folk singers. Ms. Simone's gospel songs, i.e., Children Go Where I Send You, can raise the roof and bring down the house, as she did at the Gate in '61. She is a protest singer, Brown Baby, and an actress, capable of an extraordinary range of emotions.



    Nina has the rare ability to dig into her material and bring unexpected meaning to familiar lyrics. She is eclectic with her taste and her repertoire. But whatever touches Nina, and whatever Nina touches, will reach you and evoke an emotional response. Her music is as fresh today, as it was 42 years ago, singing for that Manhattan audience. They could not have loved her more then, than we do now.




    Musicians:



    • Nina Simone (piano, vocal)

    • Al Schackman (guitar)

    • Chris White (bass)

    • Bob Hamilton (drums)




    Recording: 1961 in New York City

    Production: Cal Lampley



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Just In Time
    2. He Was Too Good to Me
    3. House of the Rising Sun
    4. Bye Bye Blackbird
    5. Brown Baby
    6. Zungo
    7. If He Changed My Name
    8. Children Go Where I Send You
    Nina Simone
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Texas Flood (Pure Pleasure) Texas Flood (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
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    Texas Flood (Pure Pleasure)

    It's hard to overestimate the impact Stevie Ray Vaughan's debut, Texas Flood, had upon its release in 1983. At that point, blues was no longer hip, the way it was in the '60s. Texas Flood changed all that, climbing into the Top 40 and spending over half a year on the charts, which was practically unheard of for a blues recording. Vaughan became a genuine star and, in doing so, sparked a revitalization of the blues. This was a monumental impact, but his critics claimed that, no matter how prodigious Vaughan's instrumental talents were, he didn't forge a distinctive voice; instead, he wore his influences on his sleeve, whether it was Albert King's pinched yet muscular soloing or Larry Davis' emotive singing. There's a certain element of truth in that, but that was sort of the point of Texas Flood. Vaughan didn't hide his influences; he celebrated them, pumping fresh blood into a familiar genre.



    When Vaughan and Double Trouble cut the album over the course of three days in 1982, he had already played his set lists countless times; he knew how to turn this material inside out or goose it up for maximum impact. The album is paced like a club show, kicking off with Vaughan's two best self-penned songs, Love Struck Baby and Pride and Joy, then settling into a pair of covers, the slow-burning title track and an exciting reading of Howlin' Wolf's Tell Me, before building to the climax of Dirty Pool and I'm Crying. Vaughan caps the entire thing with Lenny, a lyrical, jazzy tribute to his wife.




    Musicians:



    • Texas Flood - Stevie Ray Vaughan (g, voc)

    • Tommy Shannon (b)

    • Chris "Whipper" Layton (dr)




    Recording: November 1982 at Down Town Studios, Los Angeles, and Riverside Sound, Austin (Texas) by Richard Mullen / September 1983 at The Palace, Hollywood, California

    Production: Stevie Ray Vaughan, Richard Mullen & Double Troubledeutsch



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Love Struck Baby
    2. Pride And Joy
    3. Texas Flood
    4. Tell Me
    5. Testify
    6. Rude Mood
    7. Mary Had A Little Lamb
    8. Dirty Pool
    9. Im Cryin
    10. Lenny


    Bonus Tracks:
    11. SRV Speaks
    12. Tin Pan Alley (AKA Roughest Place In Town)
    13. Testify (live)
    14. Mary Had A Little Lamb (live)
    15. Wham! (live)

    Stevie Ray Vaughan
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Couldn't Stand The Weather (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Couldn't Stand The Weather (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Couldn't Stand The Weather (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress)

    With his astonishingly accomplished guitar playing, Stevie Ray Vaughan ignited the blues revival of the '80's. Vaughan drew equally from bluesmen like Albert King, Otis Rush, and Muddy Waters and rock & roll players like Jimi Hendrix and Lonnie Mack, as well as the stray jazz guitarist like Kenny Burrell, developing a uniquely eclectic and fiery style that sounded like no other guitarist, regardless of genre. Vaughan bridged the gap between blues and rock like no other artist had since the late '60s. For the next seven years, Stevie Ray was the leading light in American blues, consistently selling out concerts while his albums regularly went gold. His tragic death in 1990 only emphasized his influence in blues and American rock & roll.

    Musicians:



    • Stevie Ray Vaughan (vocal, guitar)

    • Jimmie Vaughan (guitar)

    • Stan Harrison (tenor saxophone)

    • Tommy Shannon (bass)

    • Chris "Whipper" Layton, Fran Christina (drums)



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / standard sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    Side 1
    1. Scuttlebuttin'
    2. Couldn't Stand The Weather
    3. Things That I Used To Do


    Side 2
    4. Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)
    5. Cold Shot


    Side 3
    6. Tin Pan Alley
    7. Honey Bee
    8. Stang's Swang


    Side 4
    9. SRV Speaks
    10. Hide Away
    11. Look at Little Sister
    12. Give Me Back My Wig
    13. Come On (Pt.3)

    Stevie Ray Vaughan
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Consummation (Pure Pleasure) Consummation (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Consummation (Pure Pleasure)

    Of the many albums recorded by the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra, this was the greatest. This set introduced Jones' best-known composition, A Child Is Born, and also has a colourful rendition of his sly Tiptoe, and finds the big band ripping the roof off during the lengthy and very exciting Fingers. The all-star cast (which includes flugelhornist Jones, drummer Lewis, trumpeter Marvin Stamm, trombonist Jimmy Knepper, tenor great Billy Harper, the reeds of Jerome Richardson, Jerry Dodgion and Eddie Daniels, keyboardist Roland Hanna, and bassist Richard Davis, among others) is well served by Thad Jones' inventive and swinging arrangements. A classic.




    Musicians:



    • Thad Jones (trumpet, fluegel horn, conductor)

    • Billy Harper (tenor saxophone, flute)

    • Jimmy Knepper (trombone)

    • Jerome Richardson (alto saxophone, soprano saxophone, flute)

    • Joe Farrell (basson, clarinet)

    • Roland Hanna (electric piano, piano)

    • David Spinozza (guitar)

    • Mel Lewis (drums)




    Recording: January and May 1970 at A&R Studios, New York City, by Don Hahn

    Production: Sonny Lester



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1.  Dedication

    2.  It Only Happens Every Time

    3.  Tiptoe

    4.  A Child Is Born

    5.  Us


    1.  Ahunk Ahunk

    2.  Fingers

    3.  Consummation

    Thad Jones
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • God Bless The Child (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) God Bless The Child (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    God Bless The Child (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress)

    Kenny Burrell's guitar artistry is well-documented in his years with Oscar Peterson and on his first dates as a leader on the Blue Note label, but God Bless The Child, his only date for CTI in 1971, is an under-heard masterpiece in his catalogue. Burrell's band for the set includes bassist Ron Carter, percussionist Ray Barretto, Richard Wyands on piano, flutist Hubert Laws, trumpeter Freddie Hubbard, and drummer Billy Cobham. CTI's house arranger, Don Sebesky, assembled and conducted the strings in a manner that stands strangely and beautifully apart from his other work on the label. Sebesky understood Burrell's understated approach to playing guitar. Burrell didn't belong with the fusioneers, but he could groove better than any of them. Sebesky built a moody, atmospheric soundscape behind him, one that was as impressionistic as it was illuminating of a player who could dig in and chop it up -- as he does on his own composition Love Is the Answer and Do What You Gotta Do -- and stroke it smooth and mellow as on the title track, the truly sublime Be Yourself, and Thad Jones' A Child Is Born. This is Burrell at his level best as a player to be sure, but also as a composer and as a bandleader. Magnificent.



    Musicians:



    • Kenny Burrell (guitar)

    • Freddie Hubbard (trumpet)

    • Hubert Laws (flute)

    • Hugh Lawson, Richard Wyands (piano)

    • Ron Carter (bass)

    • Billie Cobham (drums)

    • Ray Barretto, Airto Moreira (percussion)



    Recording: April & May 1971 at Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA

    Production: Creed Taylor



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Be Yourself
    2. Love Is The Answer
    3. Do What You Gotta Do
    4. A Child Is Born
    5. God Bless The Child
    Kenny Burrell
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus (Pure Pleasure) Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus (Pure Pleasure)

    Charles Mingus has a fascinating way of offering music that is grounded in tradition while remaining startlingly original. The freshness of a piece like Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus, has the effect of rendering much of what passes for jazz as tedious. The band is small for Mingus, and includes Eric Dolphy on alto saxophone and bass clarinet, Ted Curson on trumpet, and Dannie Richmond on drums. It would be one of Dolphy and Curson's last recording dates with the artist, and they seem determined to go all out for it. The leader's bass line kicks off Folk Forms No. 1, followed by Dolphy outlining the melody, and then joined by Curson. A simple riff develops into a lively New Orleans funeral march that's developed for 12 minutes. Original Faubus Fables is serious in intent - a political attack on segregation governor Faubus - but Mingus and Richmond's singing is difficult to listen to with a straight face. Still, this doesn't distract from the wonderful music. Again and again, the elasticity of the sound is fascinating, at once spacious with the bass and drums balanced against the brass and then noisy, with the horns wailing and crying. The last two pieces, What Love? and the outrageously titled All the Things You Could Be by Now if Sigmund Freud's Wife Was Your Mother, are much looser, bordering on free jazz. The album accomplishes what the best of Mingus accomplishes: the perfect tension between jazz played as an ensemble and jazz played as totally free.




    Musicians:



    • Eric Dolphy (alto saxophone, bass clarinet)

    • Ted Curson (trumpet)

    • Charles Mingus (bass)

    • Dannie Richmond (drums)




    Recording: October 1960 at Nola Penthouse Studios, New York City, by Bob d'Orleans

    Production: Nat Hentoff




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Folk Forms, No. 1

    2. Original Faubus Fables

    3. What Love

    4. All The Things You Could Be By Now If Sigmund Freud's Wife Was Your Mother

    Charles Mingus
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Quicksilver Messenger Service (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quicksilver Messenger Service (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Quicksilver Messenger Service (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress)

    Quicksilver Messenger Service's debut effort was a little more restrained and folky than some listeners had expected, given their reputation for stretching out in concert. While some prefer the mostly live Happy Trails, this self-titled collection is inarguably their strongest set of studio material, with the accent on melodic folk-rock. Highlights include their cover of folksinger Hamilton Camp's Pride of Man, probably their best studio track; Light Your Windows, probably the group's best original composition; and founding member Dino Valenti's Dino's Song (Valenti himself was in jail when the album was recorded). Gold And Silver is their best instrumental jam, and the 12-minute The Fool reflects some of the best and worst traits of the psychedelic era.



    Musicians:



    • John Cipollina, Gary Duncan (guitar, vocal)

    • David Frieberg (bass, vocal)

    • Greg Elmore (drums, percussion)




    Production: Nick Gravenites, Harvey Brooks & Pete Welding



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Pride Of Man
    2. Light Your Windows
    3. Dino's Song
    4. Gold And Silver
    5. It's Been Too Long
    6. The Fool
    Quicksilver Messenger Service
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Infinite Search (Pure Pleasure) Infinite Search (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Infinite Search (Pure Pleasure)

    With John McLaughlin, Herbie Hancock, Joe Henderson, and Jack DeJohnette, this group rivaled the best fusion bands of the day. It must have been an intimidating challenge for a young Czech bassist to lead such a group on his debut album as a frontman, especially since he composed five of the six tracks. Recorded in late 1969, roughly the same time as the historic Bitches Brew, and the year before Vitous began a stint with the innovative Weather Report, this was trend-setting fusion. It's produced by Herbie Mann, for whom Vitous played on such albums as Memphis Underground and Stone Flute.


    -Mark Allan/AMG



    Miroslav's first album; superb even in the 21st century. If you are interested in finding out about the beginnings of 'jazz-rock fusion' this record is absolutely crucial. DeJohnette and Mclaughlin both had something to prove at the time and it shows. Vitous had won a scholarship to Boston's Berklee school of music but on this evidence, he didn't need it at all and probably scared the heck out of the teaching staff before he left to go with Herbie Mann, the occasional Miles gig, and the album sessions with Shorter and Zawinul that led to Weather Report. A brilliant and influential debut from a prodigious talent; buy this one!


    -J. Miller



    Musicians:



    • Miroslav Vitous (bass)

    • Joe Henderson (tenor saxophone)

    • John McLaughlin (guitar)

    • Herbie Hancock (piano)

    • Jack DeJohnette, Joe Chambers (drums)



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Freedom Jazz Dance
    2. Mountain In The Clouds
    3. When Face Gets Pale
    4. Infinite Search
    4. I Will Tell Him On You
    6. Epilogue
    Miroslav Vitous
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • 1916 (Pure Pleasure) 1916 (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    1916 (Pure Pleasure)

    Lemmy Kilmister had been leading Motörhead for 16 years by the time 1916 was recorded in 1991. Over the years, Motörhead had experienced more than its share of personnel changes - and in fact, Kilmister was its only remaining original member. But the band's sound hadn't changed much, and time hadn't made its sledgehammer approach any less appealing. As sobering as his reflections on the horrors of World War I are on the title song, he's unapologetically amusing on Going to Brazil, Angel City (an ode to the 'beautiful' party people of L.A.), and Ramones (which salutes the New York punk band). Whether the subject matter is humorously fun or more serious, Motörhead is as inspired as ever on 1916.



    Musicians:



    • Lemmy Klimister (bass, vocal)

    • Phillip Campbell, WÜrzel (guitar)

    • Phil Taylor (drums)

    • James Hoskins (cello)




    Recording: 1991

    Production: Peter Solley & Ed Stasium



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. The One To Sing The Blues
    2. I'm So Bad (Baby I Don't Care)
    3. No Voices In The Sky
    4. Going To Brazil
    5. Nightmare/Dreamtime
    6. Love Me Forever
    7. Angel City
    8. Make My Day
    9. R.A.M.O.N.E.S.
    10. Shut You Down
    11. 1916
    Motorhead
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Picture of Heath (Pure Pleasure) Picture of Heath (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Picture of Heath (Pure Pleasure)

    First released under the title "Playboys" in 1956 it was then re-released under the title "Picture Of Heath" in 1961 perhaps owing to the fact it carried the same name as a popular men's magazine.



    This was the third session together of the dynamic duo of Chet Baker and Art Pepper the previous two having been unequivocal successes. Baker and Pepper have an instinctual rapport that yields outstanding interplay.



    These thoroughly enjoyable and often high-energy sides are perfect for bop connoisseurs as well as mainstream jazz listeners.



    Musicians:



    • Chet Baker (trumpet)

    • Art Pepper (alto saxophone)

    • Phil Urso (tenor saxophone)

    • Carl Perkins (piano)

    • Curtis Counce (bass)

    • Lawrence Marable (drums)



    Recording: October 1956




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Picture Of Heath
    2. For Miles And Miles

    3. C.T.A.
    4. For Minors Only
    5. Minor Yours
    6. Resonant Emotions

    7. Tynan Time
    Chet Baker & Art Pepper
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Concierto (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Concierto (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $44.99
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    x

    Concierto (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress)

    Jim Hall's Concierto was arguably a masterpiece and possibly the greatest LP in the history of CTI. With two legendary players in the frontline, trumpeter Chet Baker and Paul Desmond, Hall interprets standards and engaging originals. A master of melody who never wastes notes, the centerpiece for this release is Hall's interpretation of one movement from Rodrigo's Guitar Concerto, arranged by Don Sebesky. New tracks include alternate takes of You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To and Rock Skippin', plus Unfinished Business, an incomplete track that fades following Desmond's solo just as Hall starts to play (This song is actually La Paloma Azul, a Mexican folk tune played by Paul Desmond while with the Dave Brubeck Quartet about a decade earlier, also known as The Blue Dove).



    Musicians:



    • Jim Hall (guitar)

    • Chet Baker (trumpet)

    • Paul Desmond (alto saxophone)

    • Roland Hanna (piano)

    • Ron Carter (bass)

    • Steve Gadd (drums)



    Recording: April 1975 at Van Gelder's Recording Studio, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., USA by Rudy Van Gelder

    Production: Creed Taylor



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To
    2. Two's Blues
    3. The Answer Is Yes

    4. Concierto de Aranjuez
    5. Rock Skippin'
    6. Unfinished Business

    Bonus Tracks
    7. You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To (alternate take)

    8. The Answer Is Yes (alternate take)
    9. Rock Skippin' (alternate take)
    Jim Hall
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • In New York (Pure Pleasure) In New York (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    In New York (Pure Pleasure)

    Lightnin' Hopkins was one of the most over-recorded artists in the blues genre. The recordings here were made at a pivotal moment in his career. In 1960, at 48 years old, he was no longer a star in the black community, but was becoming a folk legend. His deeply personal music not only reflected the experiences of his community but touched a universal nerve. Chris Strachwitz, who often recorded Hopkins, has called his records »brief audio snapshots of one of the great folk poets to emerge from the African-American experience in Texas.« When he died in 1982 he had recorded well over 600 'audio snapshots'. From his prolific output this Candid session ranks amongst his finest and most intimate work.




    Musicians:



    • Lightnin' Hopkins (vocal, guitar, piano)




    Recording: November 1960 at Nola Penthouse Studios, New York City, by Bob d'Orleans

    Production: Nat Hentoff




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Take It Easy
    2. Mighty Crazy
    3. Your Own Fault, Baby, To Treat Me The Way You Do
    4. Ive Had My Fun If I Dont Get Well No More
    5. The Trouble Blues
    6. Lightnins Piano Boogie

    7. Wonder Why
    8. Mister Charlie

    9. Black Cat
    Lightin' Hopkins
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sunflower (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Sunflower (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Sunflower (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress)

    his superior reissue combines together two sessions led by vibraphonist Milt Jackson. The first side of Plenty, Plenty Soul, which features a nine-piece group, is highlighted by the contributions of the exuberant altoist Cannonball Adderley, while the flip side has a sextet that is not hurt by the solos of tenor-saxophonist Lucky Thompson. With pianist Horace Silver helping out on both sessions, these all-star dates still sound fresh and enthusiastic decades later.Mastered from original analog tapes and pressed on 180 gram vinyl, this is THE essential pressing of this classic LP.
    1. For Someone I Love (What's Your Story)
    2. What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?
    3. People Make the World Go Round
    4. Sunflower
    Milt Jackson
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Boogie With Canned Heat (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Boogie With Canned Heat (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Boogie With Canned Heat (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress)

    This is Canned Heat's second album and definitely their finest. Not one weak track on the entire album. If you like the Blues, Rock, and an oldies flavour you cannot go wrong with this. Also, all the band members are featured in terrific solo parts.




    Musicians:



    • Bob Hite (vocal)

    • Alan Wilson (vocal, guitar, harmonica)

    • Henry Vestine (guitar)

    • Larry Taylor (bass)

    • Adolfo de la Parra (drums)




    Recording: 1968 in Liberty Studios, Los Angeles

    Production: Dallas Smith



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Evil Woman
    2. My Crime
    3. On The Road Again
    4. World In A Jug
    5. Turpentine Moan
    6. Whiskey Headed Woman #2
    7. Amphetamine Annie
    8. An Owl Song
    9. Marie Laveau
    10. Fried Hockey Boogie

    Canned Heat
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP- Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • A Gasser (Pure Pleasure) A Gasser (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    A Gasser (Pure Pleasure)

    Although best known as a member of the vocalese supergroup Lambert, Hendricks & Ross, the great jazz singer Annie Ross's solo albums are gems unto themselves and A Gasser! from 1959 is the finest of them all. Miss Ross is in peak vocal form here and is joined by the great Zoot Sims on saxophone and much of the same band featured on the Lambert, Hendricks & Ross classic The Swingers. Don't expect any of the vocal acrobatics of the Lambert, Hendricks & Ross recordings however. This is straight-ahead jazz singing by one of the great singers in her prime. From the wry wit of Everything I've Got through the sheer perfection and beauty of You're Nearer, this set is a must-have for jazz vocal fans. Highly recommended..




    Musicians:



    • Annie Ross (vocal)

    • Zoot Sims, Bill Perkins (tenor saxophone)

    • Russ Freeman (piano)

    • Jim Hall, Billy Bean (guitar)

    • Monte Budwig (bass)

    • Mel Lewis, Frank Capp (drums)



    Recording: February & March 1959

    Production: Richard Bock




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Everything I've Got Belongs to You
    2. I Was Doin' Alright
    3. You're Nearer
    4. Invitation to the Blues
    5. Nobody's Baby
    6. You Took Advantage of Me
    7. I Don't Want to Cry Anymore
    8. Lucky So and So
    9. I Didn't Know About You
    10. Lucky Day
    Annie Ross
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Singin' The Blues (Pure Pleasure) Singin' The Blues (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Singin' The Blues (Pure Pleasure)

    Singin' The Blues was issued as Crown 5020 in spring 1957 and featured some of B.B. King's best-loved songs up to that point. The LP included four #1 R&B hits: 3 O'Clock Blues and You Know I Love You (1952), Please Love Me (1953) and You Upset Me Baby (1954); four other top ten hits; plus Blind Love from 1953 and covers of Tampa Red's Crying Won't Help You (1955) and Gatemouth Moore's Did You Ever Love A Woman from 1956. To fill out the album, a superior alternate take of Sweet Little Angel was included. As John Broven observes in his notes: In 1957 Singin' The Blues gave the first real indication that B.B. King was destined to be a major star. Absolutely seminal material; his classic hits.




    Musicians:



    • B. B. King (guitar, vocal)

    • The Maxwell Davis Orchestra



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Please Love Me
    2. You Upset Me Baby
    3. Every Day I Have the Blues
    4. Bad Luck
    5. 3 O'clock Blues
    6. Blind Love
    7. Woke Up This Morning
    8. You Know I Love You
    9. Sweet Little Angel
    10. Ten Long Hears
    11. Did You Ever Love A Woman
    12. Crying Won't Help You
    B.B. King
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Stand Back (Pure Pleasure) Stand Back (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Stand Back (Pure Pleasure)

    Vanguard may have spelled his name wrong (he prefers Charlie or Charles), but the word was out as soon as this solo debut was released: Here was a harpist every bit as authentic, as emotional, in some ways as adventuresome, as Paul Butterfield. Similarly leading a Chicago band with a veteran Black rhythm section (Fred Below on drums, Bob Anderson on bass) and rock-influenced soloists (keyboardist Barry Goldberg, guitarist Harvey Mandel), Musselwhite played with a depth that belied his age - only 22 when this was cut! His gruff vocals were considerably more affected than they would become later (clearer, more relaxed), but his renditions of Help Me, Early in the Morning, and his own Strange Land stand the test of time. He let his harmonica speak even more authoritatively on instrumentals like 39th and Indiana (essentially It Hurts Me Too sans lyrics) and Cha Cha the Blues, and his version of jazz arranger Duke Pearson's gospel-tinged Cristo Redentor has become his signature song - associated with Musselwhite probably more so than with trumpeter Donald Byrd, who originally recorded the song for Blue Note. Goldberg is in fine form (particularly on organ), but Mandel's snakey, stuttering style really stands out - notably on Help Me, his quirky original 4 P.M., and Chicken Shack, where he truly makes you think your record is skipping




    Musicians:



    • Charley Musselwhite (harmonica, vocal)

    • Harvey Mandel (guitar)

    • Barry Goldberg (piano, organ)

    • Bob Anderson (bass)

    • Fred Below Jr. (drums)




    Production: Samuel Charters




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Baby Will You Please Help Me
    2. No More Lonely Nights
    3. Cha Cha The Blues
    4. Christo Redemptor
    5. Help Me
    6. Chicken Shack
    7. Strange Land
    8. 39th And Indiana
    9. My Baby
    10. Early In The Morning
    11. 4 P. M.
    12. Sad Day
    Charley Musselwhite's Southside Blues Band
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Blues From The Gutter (Pure Pleasure) Blues From The Gutter (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
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    Blues From The Gutter (Pure Pleasure)

    This is the 1958 masterwork album of Champion Jack Dupree's long and prolific career. Cut in New York with a blasting band that included saxist Pete Brown and guitarist Larry Dale, the Jerry Wexler-produced Atlantic collection provides eloquent testimony to Dupree's eternal place in the New Orleans blues and barrelhouse firmament. There's some decidedly down-in-the-alley subject matter -- Can't Kick the Habit, T.B. Blues, a revival of Junker's Blues -- along with the stomping Nasty Boogie and treatments of the ancient themes Stack-O-Lee and Frankie & Johnny.



    Musicians:



    • Champion Jack Dupree (piano, vocal)

    • Pete Brown (alto saxophone)

    • Ennis Lowery (guitar)

    • Wendell Marshall (bass)

    • Willie Jones (drums)



    Recording: 1958 in New York by Tom Dowd
    Production: Jerry Wexler




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Strollin'
    2. T.B. Blues
    3. Can't Kick the Habit
    4. Evil Woman
    5. Nasty Boogie
    6. Junker Blues
    7. Bad Blood
    8. Goin' Down Slow
    9. Frankie and Johnny
    10. Stack-O-Lee
    Champion Jack Dupree
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Down Home (Pure Pleasure) Down Home (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Down Home (Pure Pleasure)

    Bethlehem Records was a major jazz label in the 1950's formed by Gus Wildi with an impressive roster of artists including singers Nina Simone, Carmen MacRae, Chris Conner & Mel Torme, to name a few; arrangers: Marty Paich, Russ Garcia, Frank Hunter; and musicians including: Dexter Gordon, Roland Kirk, Charles Mingus, Frank Rosolino, Herbie Mann, Stan Levey, Art Blakey, Milt Hinton, Errol Garner, Zoot Sims, Duke Ellington, J.J. Johnson and many, many others. The label distinguished itself by giving artists creative control of their projects and presented albums of rather cutting edge graphic design. Its legacy is a lengthy discography that freshly and ambitiously captured and preserved an era of truly amazing music including West Coast Cool Jazz, East Coast Bop, and Vocalists. For many of the artists, their first or greatest recorded work happened at Bethlehem. By trusting its staff and artists to make their own creative decisions, to experiment, and thus to flourish, Bethlehem actively helped create and not just document a whole and diverse era of Jazz music.
    1960, when this album was recorded, was one of Zoot Sims' most productive years. The performances here are recognised as being the masterpieces of Sims' middle period.



    Musicians:



    • Zoot Sims (tenor saxophone)

    • Dave McKenna (piano)

    • George Tucker (bass)

    • Dannie Richmond (drums)



    Recording: June 1960 in New York City by Peter Ind

    Production: Teddy Charles



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Jive At Five
    2. Doggin' Around
    3. Avalon
    4. I Cried For You
    5. Bill Bailey
    6. Goodnight Sweetheart
    7. There'll Be Some Changes Made
    8. I've Heard That Blues Before
    Zoot Sims
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure) Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
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    Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure)

    The material - many of the Dylan classics - is unsurpassable. Her voice is at its zenith, young, supple - neither undisciplined (as in her 1st records) nor the later, low vibrato warble. There is none of the self-conscious and silly Dylan vocal imitation found in Baez's later recording. Where Dylan's own singing is wonderfully raw and rough, Baez is clear and pure. Both are great for me, but very, very different from each other. These lovely renditions are like no one else's. Just pure Joan in her finest voice.



    She is backed here by several of the very best of '70s Nashville session musicians (pickers). Some folks think of Nashville sidemen as inevitably bound up with Country Music. While this is not counter-country, it fits much more into folk - as the names Dylan and Baez rightly connote.



    One Too Many Mornings is too often overlooked among Dylan's compositions, and this is among the best renditions I've heard. The full-length, unhurried treatment Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowland is spell-binding and satisfying. Perhaps my favorite, though, is the subtle and poignant Spanish Boots of Spanish Leather. Dylan's lyrical genius is fully manifest, in his gorgeous melody and Joan Baez's a wonderful performance.
    For many of us who listened both then and recently, this pristine work inevitably reminds us how much has aged in the decades since this earlier era - also recaptured so vividly in Dylan's own Chronicles. These are timely works, both for reminiscence and to introduce newbies to the non-acid experiences that stirred an earlier generation. But regardless of any social import, this is simply beautiful poetry and music.



    Musicians:



    • Joan Baez (guitar, vocal)

    • Fred Carter (mandolin)

    • Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (keyboards)

    • Stephen Stills, Pete Drake, Harold Rugg (guitar)

    • Tommy Jackson, Johnny Gimble (violin)




    Recording: 1968 by Selby Cofeen

    Production: Maynard Solomon



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Love Minus Zero/No Limit
    2. North Country Blues
    3. You Ain't Going Nowhere
    4. Drifter's Escape
    5. I Pity the Poor Immigrant

    6. Tears of Rage
    7. Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands
    8. Love Is Just a Four-Letter Word
    9. I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine

    10. The Walls of Redwing
    11. Dear Landlord
    12. One Too Many Mornings
    13. I Shall Be Released
    14. Boots of Spanish Leather
    15. Walkin' Down the Line

    16. Restless Farewell
    Joan Baez
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Alice's Restaurant (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale) Alice's Restaurant (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $34.99 $27.64

    Buy Now
    x

    Alice's Restaurant (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale)

    Although he'd been a fixture on the East Coast folk circuit for several years, Arlo Guthrie did not release his debut album until mid-1967. A majority of the attention directed at Alice's Restaurant focuses on the epic 18-plus-minute title track, which sprawled over the entire A-side of the long-player. However, it is the other half-dozen Guthrie compositions that provide an insight into his uniformly outstanding, yet astoundingly overlooked, early sides on Warner Bros. Although arguably not 100 percent factual, Alice's Restaurant Massacree -- which was recorded in front of a live audience -- is rooted in a series of real incidents.


    This decidedly anti-establishment saga of garbage dumps closed on Thanksgiving, good ol' Officer Obie, as well as Guthrie's experiences with the draft succeeds not only because of the unusual and outlandish situations that the hero finds himself in; it is also his underdog point of view and sardonic delivery that maximize the effect in the retelling. In terms of artistic merit, the studio side is an equally endowed effort containing six decidedly more traditional folk-rock compositions. Among the standouts are the haunting Chilling Of The Evening, which is given an arrangement perhaps more aptly suited to a Jimmy Webb/Glen Campbell collaboration.


    There is a somewhat dated charm in Ring-Around-a-Rosy Rag, a sly, uptempo, and hippie-friendly bit of jug band nostalgia. I'm Going Home is an underrated minor-chord masterpiece that is not only reminiscent of Roger McGuinn's Ballad of Easy Rider, but also spotlights a more sensitive and intricate nature to Guthrie's craftsmanship. Also worth mentioning is the first installment of The Motorcycle Song -- which was updated and discussed further on the live self-titled follow-up release Arlo (1968) -- notable for the extended discourse on the 'significance of the pickle'.

    Musicians:



    • Arlo Guthrie (vocal, guitar)




    Recording: 1967

    Production: Fred Hellerman & Al Brown



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Alice's Restaurant Masacree
    2. Chilling Of the Evening
    3. Ring-Around-A-Rosy Rag
    4. Now and Then
    5. I'm Going Home
    6. The Motorcycle Song
    7. Highway In the Wind
    Arlo Guthrie
    $34.99 $27.64
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I Do Not Play No Rock 'N' Roll (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) I Do Not Play No Rock 'N' Roll (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    I Do Not Play No Rock 'N' Roll (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress)

    When Mississippi Fred McDowell proclaimed on one of his last albums, I do not play no rock & roll, it was less a boast by an aging musician swept aside by the big beat than a mere statement of fact. As a stylist and purveyor of the original Delta blues, he was superb, equal parts Charley Patton and Son House coming to the fore through his roughed-up vocals and slashing bottleneck style of guitar playing. McDowell knew he was the real deal, and while others were diluting and updating their sound to keep pace with the changing times and audiences, Mississippi Fred stood out from the rest of the pack simply by not changing his style one iota. Though he scorned the amplified rock sound with a passion matched by few country bluesmen, he certainly had no qualms about passing any of his musical secrets along to his young, white acolytes, prompting several of them - including a young Bonnie Raitt - to develop slide guitar techniques of their own. Although generally lumped in with other blues 'rediscoveries' from the '60s, the most amazing thing about him was that this rich repository of Delta blues had never recorded in the '20s or early '30s, didn't get 'discovered' until 1959, and didn't become a full-time professional musician until the mid-'60s.



    Musicians:



    • Fred McDowell (vocal, guitar)


    • Jerry Puckett (bass)


    • Darin Lancaster (drums)





    Recording: September 1969 in Jackson, Mississippi, USA




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Baby Please Don't Go
    2. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl
    3. Kokomo Me Baby
    4. That's All Right Baby
    5. Red Cross Store
    6. Everybody's Down on Me
    7. 61 Highway
    8. Glory Hallelujah
    9. Jesus Is on the Mainline
    Mississippi Fred McDowell
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • A Meal You Can Shake Hands With In The Dark (Pure Pleasure) A Meal You Can Shake Hands With In The Dark (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
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    A Meal You Can Shake Hands With In The Dark (Pure Pleasure)

    Pete Brown was a Londoner and a veteran of the underground scene. Born in 1940, he first came to prominence as a poet. He was just 14 when his first poem appeared in Evergreen Revue in the US. Then in the early sixties he worked alongside another British poet Mike Horowitz. His direct involvement with rock music came when he was asked to form a songwriting partnership with Jack Bruce to write lyrics for Cream and the partnership proceeded to produce the lyrics for many of their finest songs: Wrapping Paper, I Feel Free, Sunshine Of Your Love and White Room. After the demise of Cream, Brown continued to write with Bruce but also began his own recording career with The Battered Ornaments who included Chris Spedding. After an initial 45, which with its wailing saxes and effective vocals was underrated, the band recorded this album which was a mixture of jazz-rock and blues. Dark Lady, The Old Man and Station Song were among the fine tracks and the latter later got a further airing on the Before Singing Lessons compilation. Station Song and Dark Lady had earlier featured along with Travelling Blues on the ultra-rare promo-only Harvest Sampler in 1969.



    Brown then suffered the humiliation of being thrown out of the band the night before they had a Hyde Park gig with The Rolling Stones. Brown's response was to form a new band, Piblokto!



    This release breaks the long sides down to four sides of vinyl which enhances the sound quality considerably. Also of interest is that it has been mastered in the same studio at Abbey Road as was the initial release and from the same original analogue tape masters.




    Musicians:



    • Pete Brown (vocal, trumpet)

    • Nisar A. Khan (tenor saxophone)

    • Dick Heckstall-Smith (tenor saxophone)

    • Chris Spedding (guitar)

    • Charlie Hart (organ)

    • Butch Porter (bass)

    • Rob Tait (drums)

    • Pete Bailey (conga)




    Production: Andrew King and Dick Heckstall-Smith



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    LP1
    1. Dark Lady
    2. The Old Man
    3. Station Song
    4. The Politician


    LP2
    1. Rainy Taxi Girl
    2. Morning Call
    3. Sandcastle
    4. Travelling Blues (Or The New Used Jew's Dues Blues)

    Pete Brown
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Newport Uproar (Pure Pleasure) Newport Uproar (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Newport Uproar (Pure Pleasure)

    The 1967 Newport Jazz Festival, fourteenth in a world-famous series, was inexplicably the first at which Lionel Hampton had ever appeared. Better late than never, the great vibist and bandleader came, played and conquered. As the crowd roars ecstatically at the end of this record, the awed but happy voice of producer George Wein is heard: »This hasn't happened since Duke « he begins, casting back in his mind to 1956 and the nearest comparable triumph.



    There is nothing quite so effective as a big band at an outdoor jazz festival. So the 1967 Newport programme included those of Count Basie, Buddy Rich, Woody Herman, Don Ellis and Lionel Hampton. Lionel knew the competition he had to face, and knew that in the festival's climatic spot - the last act on the last night - his performance would be compared with those of all the others. He prepared accordingly.
    Members of his Inner Circle, the octet with which he normally works, would provide the nucleus for an orchestra largely composed of alumni from his earlier bands. When the call went out to the Old Guard, the response was magnificent, as a glance at the personnel will show. Top names in the profession came back to join him, to form one of the great all-star bands of all time. A two week engagement at The Metropole in New York, immediately before the festival, served as a prolonged dress rehearsal, where the ensembles were polished and new arrangements familiarized. Enthusiasm mounted night by night in the Seventh Avenue club, among musicians and public alike, until Newport and the evening of 3rd July were reached. Then, as you will hear, the spirit was willing and the flesh far, far from weak.



    All these preparations ensured a good performance, but the spark, the magic necessary to make it a great one, had to come from the leader. Everybody knows that he is a kind of rhythmic dynamo-driving, full of energy, unsparing of himself. His commitment and conviction communicate rapidly with any audience, so that it is soon won over to his side. Yet in the long, ninety minute program, errors in pacing would have been easy, forgivable, but extremely damaging. A climax reached too soon would have led to anti-climax, and a flat feeling as the crowd left the ground. As it was, Lionel's long professional experience served him superbly, so that his program rose steadily and inexorably to the all-out, emotional frenzy of Flying Home. Like a good general, he never lost his grasp on the situation. He inspired his men by personal example on the vibes, reinforced the beat on a second set of drums, and finally brought up the reserves - Alan Dawson, Milt Buckner and Illinois Jacquet - at just the right time, and in the right spot, to secure an unforgettable triumph and a tumultuous ovation.



    Musicians:



    • Lionel Hampton (vibraphone, piano, drums)

    • Illinois Jacquet (tenor saxophone)

    • Snooky Young, Wallace Davenport (trumpet)

    • Al Grey, Benny Powell (trombone)

    • Jerome Richardson, George Dorsey, Ed Pazant (reeds)

    • John Spruill, Milt Buckne (piano)

    • Billy Mackel (guitar)

    • George Duvivier (bass)

    • Steve Little (drums)



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Turn Me Loose
    2. Thai Silk
    3. Tempo's Birthday
    4. Greasy Greens
    5. Greasy Greens (Encore)
    6. Meety Benny Baily
    7. Medley:
    Hey! Ba-Ba-Re-Bop/Hamp's Boogie Woogie
    8. Misunderstood Blues
    9. Flying Home
    Lionel Hampton
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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