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  • Pro-Ject VC-S Record Cleaning Machine Pro-Ject VC-S Record Cleaning Machine Quick View

    $499.00
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    Pro-Ject VC-S Record Cleaning Machine


    Have a question about this product? Please email our href=mailto:audioadvisor@soundstagedirect.com>audio advisor or call 1-877-929-8729 with any questions or concerns regarding your equipment purchase.


    Extremely capable wet cleaning machine that removes dirt and dust from your valuable records


    VC-S is a radical new development. There are features which are new for record cleaning machines in this price range:


    • It is super powerful and cleans a record in 1 max 2 rotations (best is 1 turn forward, 1 turn backward)
    • It turns the record superfast within 2 seconds per rotation, which is about 3 times faster than usual cleaning machines do. The result is a much faster cleaning of records as well as much cleaner and 100% dry records with NO residual humidity!
    • A new type of clamp seales the record label from cleaning fluid and avoids damage on the label!!
    • Robust metal arm, which is easy to use, mechanically stable fixing! (no springs)
    • Big container (2.5 l) for used fluid, that shows fill-up capacity and guarantees no spillage of used cleaning fluid. Discharging of used fluid is extremely easy to do.
    • Newly developed vinyl cleaning concentrate Wash it offers very good cleaning results and reduces static charge, so record wear as well as stylus wear is significantly reduced.




    Pro-Ject
    $499.00
    Pro-Ject Record Cleaning Machine Buy Now
  • Ashes & Dust Ashes & Dust Quick View

    $34.99
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    Ashes & Dust

    Ashes and Dust is a masterful work of art and a particularly important statement for the Grammy Award winning artist Warren Haynes. The songs are immediately and clearly different from his usual style - encompassing beautiful acoustic arrangements, a rootsy/Americana soundscape and honeyed vocals that cut straight through to the soul. Knowing that he wanted to pursue a more folk-based approach on this project, he brought in the New Jersey-based Americana band Railroad Earth as collaborators.
    LP1
    1. Is It Me Or You
    2. Coal Tattoo
    3. Blue Maiden's Tale
    4. Company Man
    5. New Year's Eve
    6. Beat Down The Dust
    7. Glory Road


    LP2
    1. Gold Dust Woman
    2. Stranded In Self-Pity
    3. Wanderlust
    4. Spots Of Time
    5. Hallelujah Boulevard
    6. Word On The Wind

    Warren Haynes
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Pro-Ject Primary Phono USB Turntable 2 COLORS AVAILABLE Pro-Ject Primary Phono USB Turntable Quick View

    $299.00
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    Pro-Ject Primary Phono USB Turntable



    Have a question about this product? Please email our audio advisor or call 1-877-929-8729 with any questions or concerns regarding your equipment purchase.


    Pro-Ject's belt-driven Primary turntable is your answer to achieving affordable high fidelity vinyl playback and digitization with minimal setup.


    If you thought that a turntable set-up is complicated like rocket-science, Primary proves the contrary. This good sounding belt-drive deck offers the fastest possible installation process because it comes pre-adjusted out of the box. No further set-up is needed. Tracking force and anti-skating are carefully set. An acrylic dust cover is included. The turntable is available in matt black or matt white colour. Because Primary Phono USB comes with pre-mounted cartridge and built-in phono preamplifier with USB output, connection to both line-level input of your hifi system and PC/Mac easily can be used simultaneously! Open-Source recording software Audacity® is not based on a specific platform, is available for free and the perfect solution for recording and processing of your audio data.


    Pro-Ject
    $299.00
    Primary Phono USB Turntable - 2 Colors Available
    Buy Now
  • Pro-Ject Juke Box E Turntable Pro-Ject Juke Box E Turntable Quick View

    $499.00
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    Pro-Ject Juke Box E Turntable



    Have a question about this product? Please email our audio advisor or call 1-877-929-8729 with any questions or concerns regarding your equipment purchase.


    All-in-one music system with turntable, Bluetooth, 3 extra audio inputs & easy set-up!


    Juke Box E is a record player, phono stage, a Bluetooth receiver, a line pre-amplifier and a power amplifier in one. Only requiring only a pair of speakers to make a complete system. If you thought that a starter turntable sytem is complicated to set up, Juke Box E proves the contrary. This good sounding belt-drive deck offers the fastest possible installation process because it comes pre-adjusted out of the box and offers superb sound quality. Tracking force and anti-skating of the turntable section are carefully set. An acrylic dust cover is included.


    Pro-Ject
    $499.00
    Juke Box E Turntable Buy Now
  • Dust & Grooves: Adventures In Record Collecting (Book) Dust & Grooves: Adventures In Record Collecting (Book) Quick View

    $66.00
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    Dust & Grooves: Adventures In Record Collecting (Book)


    416-Page Photography-And-Interview Coffee Table Book About The
    World's Most Fascinating And Accomplished Vinyl Collectors


    Created By Noted Photographer Eilon Paz


    The Second Revised Edition Of The Book Profiles Over 130 Vinyl Collectors,
    Featuring A Foreword By The RZA And Interviews With
    Questlove, Gilles Peterson, Four-Tet, The Gaslamp Killer, And More.


    This Edition Has 20 More Pages Than The First Edition



    "Dust & Grooves began as a labor of love but has become a worldwide phenomenon. Paz has gained access to the personal troves of well-known collectors from all over the globe, showcasing each collector as well as his or her collections."- ABC News


    Eilon Paz's 416-page coffee-table book illuminates over 130 vinyl connoisseurs and their collections in the most intimate of environments - their record rooms. With a foreword by the RZA, compelling photographic essays are paired with in-depth interviews to illustrate what motivates record collectors to keep digging.


    Readers get an up close and personal look at a variety of well-known vinyl champions as well as a glimpse into the collections of world-renowned and lesser-known DJs, producers, record dealers, and everyday enthusiasts. The book is divided into two main parts: the first features 250 full-page photos framed by captions and select quotes, while the second consists of 12 full length interviews that delve deeper into collectors' personal histories and vinyl troves.


    It all started out several years ago as nothing more than a way for photographer Paz to engage in a personal project in his free time. Adrift in Brooklyn after emigrating from Israel, Paz - a record collector on the side - thought it might be fun to start taking photos of people whose record collections were both larger and weirder than his own. These portraits turned into the Dust & Grooves website, which quickly developed a global following that grew every time a new portrait was added to the mix. People all over the world seemed to dig not only the beauty of Eilon's photos, but the interviews with the collectors-a motley, if generally charming, crew of non-violent obsessives who turned out to be at least as intriguing as the records they collected.


    Unearthing the very soul of the vinyl community, his book will appeal to a broad spectrum of readers, from die-hard record enthusiasts to fans of pop culture, sharp photography, and music history.


    Eilon Paz has shot for Israel's top cultural publications and is a regular contributor for the US based food/travel magazine, Saveur, and his work appeared in worldwide publications such as Wax Poetics, Monocle, Conde Nast Traveler, Delta Airlines' Sky magazine, and the French music magazine Vibrations.

    Eilon Paz
    $66.00
    Book - Sealed Buy Now
  • Meridian Meridian Quick View

    $18.99
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    Meridian

    Evan Caminiti''s slow but steady progression towards electronic music from sand-swept guitar drone mirrors the pace of the music he makes. It has been measured, each move well-considered and clearly intentional. Caminiti has immersed himself in electronic production on Meridian, creating organic sounds through his machines, patching sounds that recall the brassy resonance of horns and hazy choral clusters. Synthesizers hiss and crackle under layers of reverb and fog. Sounds undulate and implode in upon themselves, with bursts of noise dropping in and out to create shadows of rhythm. Caminiti''s electronic systems do not run autonomously - the sounds heard on Meridian required real-time human interaction to bring them to life, and that human touch is essential to the mysterious atmosphere he produces on this new album. On Meridian, Caminiti expands upon the themes he began developing on two of his previous solo works, Dreamless Sleep and Night Dust, and with his other project, Barn Owl. Barn Owl's most recent album, V, incorporated more electronic textures and layers than their previous works, hinting at the direction that Caminiti takes on Meridian. While Dreamless Sleep and Night Dust were centered around Caminiti's guitar and his manipulations of the instrument, Meridian highlights Caminiti''s dextrous synthesizer work and production skills. Chiming tones float above monstrous swells of sub-bass, creating the illusion of a massive spacial divide. Caminiti adds rhythms and dynamic swells to abstract sonic textures and field recordings taken over the course of two years, grounding the album in specific times and places, however obscured from the listener. The album takes its name from the concept of energy flowing throughout the body along different paths called meridians. The pieces on Meridian were developed through live performance and made with the intention of being played at full volume, causing the sounds to course through the veins and along the meridional paths. The tracks pulsate and flow, from the throbbing beat of "Collapse" to the orchestral sounds of "Wire," all connected by the foggy, atmospheric framework established on album opener "Overtaken."
    1. Overtaken
    2. Curtains
    3. Collapse
    4. Arc
    5. Steam
    6. Wire
    7. Excelsior
    8. Signal
    9. Mercury
    Evan Caminiti
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Digging In The Dust: Home Recordings 1976 Digging In The Dust: Home Recordings 1976 Quick View

    $17.99
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    Digging In The Dust: Home Recordings 1976

    Songwriter/guitarist Mark Fosson grew up in Kentucky, where he began writing songs while he was still in his early teens. In the late '70s he sent some song demos to John Fahey's West Coast-based Takoma Records, and Fahey, impressed with what he heard, offered Fosson a recording deal. Fosson lost no time in relocating to Los Angeles and began recording with Fahey, but as bad luck would have it, Takoma was in some difficulty, and the label soon folded. Fahey allowed Fosson to retain the master tapes of the sessions, however.


    Now located on the West Coast, Fosson met fellow songwriter Edward Tree, and the two began working together, eventually forming the Bum Steers, a country-tinged group, in the late '80s. Fosson material appeared on several soundtracks through the 1990s. In 2001 he began collaborating with singer/songwriter Lisa O'Kane, who recorded several of his songs, and Fosson also began recording a solo project, Jesus on a Greyhound, which was eventually released on Big Otis Records. The record drew positive reviews and Fosson was frequently compared to Americana artists like Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Joe Ely, John Prine, and Guy Clark.


    The Fahey material finally saw the light of day as The Lost Takoma Sessions from Drag City Records in 2006. His instrumental piece Another Fine Day is featured on the critically acclaimed Tompkins Square compilation Imaginational Anthem. Now Tompkins Square has put together more hard to come by but welcome material from this gifted artist with the collection Digging In The Dust: Home Recordings 1976, an 11-track set of home recordings Fosson made circa 1976.

    1. Quarter Moon
    2. Arrival of the Grand Picayune
    3. Cosmic Hiccup
    4. Frozen Fingers
    5. Gorilla Mountain
    6. Nancy's Waltz
    7. Sky Piece
    8. Back in the Saddle Again
    9. Chillicothe
    10. Frozen Fingers (alternate take)
    11. Quarter Moon (alternate take)
    Mark Fosson
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Congrats Congrats Quick View

    $21.99
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    Congrats

    A cyborg dance party for a broken future that's closer
    than you think - Pitchfork


    Off Your Face Euphoria - The Line of Best Fit


    hypnotic, electronic climax-rock - SPIN


    scuzzy, funk-fuelled energy - FACT Mag


    Holy Fuck took the world by surprise around 2005 because there was
    just nothing like them-a hardcore thrift-store found-object punk
    band with a relentless commitment to rhythm and a sense for
    atmosphere better matched to a close encounter of the third kind
    than a simple rock concert. Think EinstÜrzende Neubauten re-inspired
    by Fela Kuti with Brian Eno working as keyboard tech and every
    channel on the mixer set to max power. It was the best ride out there
    while it lasted, up to and including their 2010 full-length Latin,
    recorded largely in too-brief breaks while on the road. That album
    cemented Holy Fuck's sound and reputation for unapologetic
    instrumental noise but at the end of yet another insane touring cycle,
    it was time to take a break which turned into a hiatus which turned
    into a chance to explore other projects and production work. (Like the
    bands Lids, Dusted and Etiquette, or production for Metz, Alvvays and
    Viet Cong.)


    They'd been moving faster than they'd ever expected, especially after
    a 2007 sophomore release that came close to securing Canada's
    prestigious Juno and Polaris Music Prize. (Not to mention festival slots
    at All Tomorrow's Parties, Glastonbury, Coachella and more-plus Lou
    Reed said they were the best band he'd seen at SXSW.) The strategy
    was just to stay busy, says founder and noisemaster Brian Borcherdt,
    but soon they started to feel like Indiana Jones running from that
    boulder: "He had to step aside and let things settle!"


    But there's nothing Indiana Jones does better than the shock reveal, is
    there? And so in 2016 Holy Fuck suddenly announced the release of
    Congrats, a surprise full-length two years in the making that is by any
    scientific measure their holiest fuckiest release ever: "When you're
    sitting still in a van and staring out the windows, you start to dream
    about all the other things you want to do," says Borcherdt. "This album
    is exactly what we couldn't do then."


    Checking into a "proper" studio, rather than the barn in rural Ontario
    where most of Holy Fuck's records were made, Congrats was
    recorded by the same lineup that recorded Latin: Borcherdt, Graham
    Walsh, Matt "Punchy" McQuaid, and Matt Schulz. As they worked, they
    discovered that Congrats was a process of refining things, Walsh
    says-both physically and philosophically. Their ad hoc arsenal of
    low-budget hi-tech toys has been streamlined down to what he calls
    the nervous system of the band: "What gets run through our system is
    the seed of the idea for our music, and the system is what we play. This
    record is almost a beginning-the first stage of a new way for us."


    So consider those previous albums prelude to Holy Fuck's true
    breakthrough, and recognize Congrats as the moment when Holy
    Fuck take the chaos and craziness (and charm) that have always been
    at the heart of their band and not so much control it as concentrate it.
    Now they're heavier, wilder, leaner, sharper, more daring and more
    unpredictable than ever before, on fire with the power of inspired
    outsiders like Suicide, Silver Apples, Can, Mission of Burma or the
    Monks or even Sun Ra, says Borcherdt, whose pursuit of his own kind
    of musical purity is exactly what Holy Fuck are after. Yes, it took them
    a few years, which in 2016 is supposed to be the career suicide, but
    they took that time to take chances. "We were told we did everything
    wrong," Borcherdt says now, laughing-but really Congrats is the
    sound of a band doing absolutely everything right.

    1. Chimes Broken
    2. Tom Tom
    3. Shivering
    4. Xed Eyes
    5. Neon Dad
    6. House Of Glass
    7. Sabbatics
    8. Shimmering
    9. Acidic
    10. Crapture
    Holy Fuck
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Infinite Light Infinite Light Quick View

    $16.99
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    Infinite Light

    This duo has been playing together for many years as part of Black Mountain. With an abundance of creative energy to spare, they decided to start this separate project. On their self-titled debut, minimal and spacious arrangements and a moody, theatrical vocal style aptly expose the demons, creating songs that creep into your bones with a haunting chill.
    1.Listened On
    2.When You Go
    3.Wind Me Up
    4.Take Me Back
    5.Jump In
    6.Heaven
    7.Castles and Caves
    8.Highway
    9.Breathe
    10.Days Go By
    Lightning Dust
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Amplifying Host Amplifying Host Quick View

    $16.99
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    Amplifying Host

    Amplifying Host finds Richard Youngs wandering the guitar desert somewhere between Ry Cooders Paris, Texas score and Neil Youngs work on Dead Man. Yet, the randomly determined chord movements and Youngs stretched-out vocal passes across the record are, perhaps, more akin to Jandeks Six And Six, here, removed from its gauze and dipped in a dark gold. When Youngs bends strings in this anglo-americana vision, its like hes bending spoons.


    For more than 20 years, the UKs Richard Youngs has been at the forefront of progressive minimalism, through solo home recording projects and collaborations with the likes of Simon Wickham-Smith and Makoto Kawabata (Acid Mothers Temple). Leaving a very human fingerprint on even the most far-reaching experimentations, Youngs has built an extensive, intriguing catalog that just begs one to go deep.


    Youngs is joined on Amplifying Host by Damon Krukowski (Galaxie 500, Damon and Naomi), whose subtle, free-form drums sizzle and scatter around Youngs lunar dust bowl compositions.

    1. Furrows Again

    2. Too Strong for the Power
    3. Tessellations
    4. Holding onto the Sea
    5. A Hole in the Earth
    6. This is the Music
    Richard Youngs
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • You Should Be At Home Here You Should Be At Home Here Quick View

    $15.99
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    You Should Be At Home Here

    Formed in 1995 by Mat Brooke and Jenn Ghetto, Carissa's Wierd spent the better part of a decade crafting intricate, melancholic music with hushed harmonies, heartrending lyrics, and sweeping string movements. While Brooke and Ghetto formed the core of the group, various incarnations of the band also included Sera Cahoone, Ben Bridwell, Sarah Standard, and Jeff Hellis, amongst others. Upon the dissolution of Carissa's Wierd, former members of the band went on to form Grand Archives, S, Sera Cahoone, and most notably, Band of Horses. The widespread success of these projects in many ways legitimizes the humble beginnings of Carissa's Wierd and the promise of their sound.


    Following the release of the retrospective compilation, Theyll Only Miss You When You Leave: Songs 1996-2003, Hardly Art is reissuing all three of the Carissas Wierd full-lengths. Long out of print, You Should Be at Home Here is the second full-length record in the Carissas Wierd trilogy, originally released on CD by Brown Records in 2001. It is now being released on vinyl for the first time via Hardly Art. The vinyl version comes on opaque brown double vinyl and is housed in custom dust sleeves with a download code.

    1. Brooke Daniels Tiny Broken Fingers
    2. The Color That Your Eyes Changed With the Color of Your Hair
    3. Halfway Spoken Heart That Feels Comfort in Everything Until it Disappears and Then Its Gone
    4. A Loose Hair Falls Into a Glass of Water Without Ice
    5. Fear Not My Friend for Tonight We Ride
    6. Blessed Arms That Hold You Tight, Freezing Cold and Alone
    7. All Apologies and Smiles, Yours Truely, Ugly Valentine
    8. The Ghost of a Dead Hummingbird Flying Around the Room
    9. The Part About the Vine Thats Growing Through the Window and Reaching Towards My Bed
    10. You Should Be at Home Here
    Carissa's Wierd
    $15.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Songs About Leaving Songs About Leaving Quick View

    $13.99
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    Songs About Leaving

    Formed in 1995 by Mat Brooke and Jenn Ghetto, Carissa's Wierd spent the better part of a decade crafting intricate, melancholic music with hushed harmonies, heartrending lyrics, and sweeping string movements. While Brooke and Ghetto formed the core of the group, various incarnations of the band also included Sera Cahoone, Ben Bridwell, Sarah Standard, and Jeff Hellis, amongst others. Upon the dissolution of Carissa's Wierd, former members of the band went on to form Grand Archives, S, Sera Cahoone, and most notably, Band of Horses. The widespread success of these projects in many ways legitimizes the humble beginnings of Carissa's Wierd and the promise of their sound.


    Following the release of the retrospective compilation, Theyll Only Miss You When You Leave: Songs 1996-2003, Hardly Art is reissuing all three of the Carissas Wierd full-lengths. Long out of print, Songs About Leaving is the third and final record in the Carissas Wierd trilogy, originally released on CD by Sad Robot in 2002. It is now being released on vinyl for the first time via Hardly Art. The LP version of this release comes on marbled light green wax and housed in a custom dust sleeve with a download code.

    1. You Should Be Hated Here
    2. Silently Leaving the Room
    3. So You Wanna Be a Superhero
    4. September Come Take This Heart Away
    5. Ignorant Piece of Shit
    6. The Piano Song
    7. Theyll Only Miss You When You Leave
    8. A New Holiday (November 16th)
    9. Farewell to All These Rotten Teeth
    10. Sofisticated Fuck Princess Please Leave Me Alone
    11. Low Budget Slow Motion Soundtrack Song for the Leaving Scene
    12. It Was Probably Green (March 19th, 1983)
    Carissa's Wierd
    $13.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Double Star (On Sale) Double Star (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $16.99 $12.74 Save $4.25 (25%)

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    Double Star (On Sale)

    Limited Edition



    Just ten years ago, Rick Rizzo and Tara Key put the finishing touches on their Thrill Jockey debut, Dark Edson Tiger, did a few live shows including All Tomorrow's Parties at Camber Sands, and jubilantly declared the whole affair a rousing success, vowing to ride the tsunami swell of momentum into their next project.



    And now, in a Van Winkle like-daze, they are back, a new batch of instrumental collaborations ready to test the brave new decade. It would be easy to say that they simply wanted to wait out the debacle of poor government and unmitigated corporate greed, but truth be told, the seeds for Double Star were sown in early live New York City sessions with bassist Tim Harris not long after the Dark Edson dust had settled. These let-the-tape-roll sessions produced some of the guitar psychedelia that long-time observers might have expected from these two, including the epic tracks that now comprise Noisy Attic as well as the genesis of Interruptive Organ.



    The DNA for this album of course lies in their respective Kentucky punk rock roots, but a lot of living has been done between then and now. Double Star is a barrel-aged kind of record, sometimes inviting small fragrant sips, but sometimes asking you to knock one back and burn the throat a little. Worth waiting a decade for.

    1. Interruptive Organ
    2. Rizzo Starts
    3. Insanity Stomp
    4. Hungry
    5. Descending Comment
    6. Jagged Naught
    7. Roundabout Ways
    8. Loop 2
    9. Yes I Wait
    10. Forgiven
    11. BWG Stately
    Rick Rizzo And Tara Key
    $16.99 $12.74 Save $4.25 (25%)
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Pinata Beats Pinata Beats Quick View

    $21.99
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    Pinata Beats

    There are few musicians - let alone beat-makers - in the world whose output in its raw form provides his listener with a full on musical experience before anything is added. Madlib is such a talent. Hip hop is his canvas, but he creates the most wondrous things with it. Before a microphone is switched on, before a rhyme even uttered, a Madlib beat stands alone as a complete thing. Since the issue of the collaborative album with rapper Freddie Gibbs - Piñata, already being hailed as contender for rap album of the year - we've been asked countless times to issue the beats Madlib created for the project as instrumentals. And we've conceded. Piñata put Gibbs in the spotlight, one that a growing audience is finally acknowledging that he deserves.


    On Piñata Beats, though, it's Madlib, quietly spinning on the center stage. Through seventeen cuts of arcane film snippets, dusted funk and soul, psych and prog rock musical diversions, Madlib proves to live up to what Gibbs once said of him: "Madlib quite simply, is music."

    LP 1
    1. Supplier
    2. Scarface
    3. Deeper
    4. High
    5. Harold's
    6. Bomb
    7. Shitsville
    8. Thuggin'
    9. Real
    10. Uno


    LP 2
    1. Robes
    2. Broken
    3. Lakers
    4. Knicks
    5. Shame
    6. Watts
    7. Piñata

    Madlib
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun Quick View

    $22.99
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    Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun

    Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun begins with Crater, a ragged anthem that erupts with frayed guitar and thundering rhythm. Dallas and Travis Good's trudging riffs light the low-slung growl of Gord Downie:


    Hello there / Gentle Son / A crater / We're creating!


    Crater is an arrival: the mission statement of a young band unhinged, igniting ten songs of visceral punk rock exultation. Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun is a spirited exploration of the darkness surrounding daylight, a rallying cry from the Secret Museum of Mankind:


    Crater! / Getting crushed in our dreams / Or in our dreams / Doing all the crushing


    Downie's words burn in unison with the charging Sadies, the mantra of a band forged out of primal necessity. This album is a vital, reckless, and ecstatic moment, gleaming with the proud imperfections of a group discovering its voice.


    It came together urgently but slowly, after the long-time Toronto friends first recorded together for Lake Ontario Waterkeepers in 2006. Fleeting sessions over the next seven years yielded finished songs in immediate, alchemical takes. Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun is the action of first-thought-best-thought.


    The project's namesake, The Conquering Sun fuses The Sadies' rusted psychedelia with Downie's humble, volatile wail. Mike Belitsky's roiling drums, and Sean Dean's sure, standing bass spur the band through uncharted desert-scapes.


    Working the fugitive dust / Under the conquering sun / Nature, please be good to us / Under the conquering sun


    Each song brims with energy, electricity embellishing a simple, rustic core. Acoustic inflections are cached in the album's array of fiery environments, staggering in its balance of ferocity and craft.


    Downie cries out possessed on It Didn't Start To Break My Heart Until This Afternoon: a pulsating blast of brash guitars and fuzzed-out gnarl.


    Drive it like we stole it / Through the snowflakes, into the cold of the sun


    On Budget Shoes, guitars shine over the tumbling bedrock of desolate but hopeful imagism. Downie writes in a universal voice, with a chorus taunting shadow from light. On Los Angeles Times, nations gather under that conquering blaze, singing unanimous poetry of promise and provocation:


    Raise a glass of hope / Raise a glass of liberty / And a glass of something else / May we be at ease with ourselves!


    The Sadies' effortlessly invoke this primitive emotion, intuiting Downie's themes with rollicking instrumental passages. On Devil Enough, Downie's solemn musings are liberated by The Sadies' roving plainsong; sobering internal sentiment brought to life with the flame of improvisation:


    You're making me drop things / I can't hold my cup / My state of being / Isn't what it was / The light the light / And my eyes adjust / What?s for sure is Devil Enough


    One Good Fast Job sneers like a siren, blunt guitars circling Downie's snarl. Demand Destruction pops with environmental pressure, coaxing an answer to a nuclear dilemma:


    And as the sun went down behind the shadow / Of this invisible war / You say, Is this accident ever over anymore?


    Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun spans depths and ages in its relentless half-hour, before concluding on an only note of reprieve. Saved dwells in the light of darkness, capturing our silent vibration of debt to the source. The album's last moments glint in the rapturous calm of collective awe:


    You say nothing can be saved / It all goes away / Darkness falls and colours fade / And the music gets so loud it flaps your pant legs


    Gord Downie, The Sadies, And The Conquering Sun boils with hope and irreverence; toils with fire as a tool and a curse. This is the combustion of brotherhood and dissent: music of wisdom and innocence:


    It is the work, day is your word, night is the glue.


    by Jonathan Shedletzky

    1. Crater
    2. The Conquering Sun
    3. Los Angeles Times
    4. One Good Fast Job
    5. It Didn't Start To Break My Heart Until This Afternoon
    6. Budget Shoes
    7. Demand Destruction
    8. Devil Enough
    9. I'm Free, Disarray Me
    10. Saved
    Gord Downie, The Sadies, and The Conquering Sun
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Trouble Is A Lonesome Town Trouble Is A Lonesome Town Quick View

    $18.99
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    Trouble Is A Lonesome Town

    THRIFTSTORE MASTERPIECE is a revolving music collective devoted to paying homage to the
    underdog records of years past. The debut album revisits Lee Hazlewood's 1963 lost classic Trouble
    Is A Lonesome Town and features Pete Yorn, Frank Black (Pixies), Isaac Brock (Modest Mouse),
    Courtney Taylor-Taylor (The Dandy Warhols), Eddie Argos (Art Brut), the late Larry Norman and more.


    In 1963, Lee Hazlewood released his debut album Trouble is a Lonesome Town to little fanfare. It
    was a collection of solo acoustic songs stitched together with a narrative that described life in a
    fictional small town inhabited by outlaws, thieves, and down-and-out laborers. The album was hokey,
    but hip. Corny, but cool. It evoked a bygone era of pastoral American towns and their sometimes seedy underbellies, somewhat like a darker version of the Andy Griffith Show or a more sinister
    Prairie Home Companion. More importantly, it was a fully realized concept album that predated
    the trend that is so common in today' s music world. Hazlewood had originally intended the songs
    as demos for his publisher, in hopes that other artists might someday record them. A half century
    later, the music collective known as THRIFTSTORE MASTERPIECE has done exactly that.


    Producer I band leader Charles Normal explains I first came across the record around the turn of the
    millennium while living in Oslo, Norway. I found it in a secondhand junk shop and it struck a nostalgic
    note somewhere within me. It made me homesick for the panoply of Americana I had experienced
    while slumming it in the Southwestern border towns and California desert whistle stops I drifted
    through when I first started playing music on the road. The record didn't leave my turntable for
    months. Years later, I started to envision the record as a more orchestrated statement and began
    recording the basic tracks in my studio.


    My brother, singer Larry Norman, lent his voice to a couple of the tracks, but when he passed away
    from a heart attack in 2008 I fell into a deep funk and put the project on the back burner. I couldn't
    bring myself to harmonize with his vocals ... it was just too emotional to deal with. It wasn't until much
    later, prompted in part by Isaac Brock, that I dusted off the tapes and hard drives and began to finish
    it. I went through my address book and started calling friends who happened to be in possession of
    great voices to see if they were interested in joining in.

    1. Long Black Train - featuring Frank Black
    2. Ugly Brown -featuring Larry Norman
    3. Son Of A Gun- featuring Frank Black
    4. We All Make The Flowers Grow- featuring Kristin Blix
    5. Run Boy Run - featuring Frank Black
    6. Six Feet Of Chain- featuring Pete Yorn
    7. The Railroad- featuring Isaac Brock
    8. Look At That Woman - featuring Courtney Taylor-Taylor
    9. Peculiar Guy- featuring Eddie Argos
    1 0. Trouble Is A Lonesome Town - featuring Larry Norman
    Thriftstore Masterpiece
    $18.99
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  • Gargoyle (Awaiting Repress) Gargoyle (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

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    Gargoyle (Awaiting Repress)

    Early in 2016, Mark was at home in LA, working on some ideas for what might turn into his next album when he got an email from a friend, an English musician named Rob Marshall, thanking Mark for contributing to a new project he was putting together, Humanist. The pair first met in 2008, when Marshall's former band Exit Calm supported Soulsavers, who Mark was singing with at the time. Now Rob was offering to write Mark some music to return the favour: "I was like, Hey man, I'm getting ready to make a record if you've got anything?'" Mark recalls. "Three days later he sent me *10 things !"


    In the meantime, Mark had written 'Blue Blue Sea', a rippling mood piece that he thought might be a more fruitful direction for his new record. "It's almost always how my records start," he explains. "I let the first couple of songs tell me what the next couple should sound like, and it's really the same process when I'm writing words. Whatever my first couple of lines are, tell me what the next couple should be. I've always built things like that, sort of like making a sculpture I guess."


    Within an hour, Mark had written words and vocal lines for two of the pieces Rob had cooked up at Mount Sion Studios in Kent and pinged through the virtual clouds to California. Rob's music fitted perfectly with the direction Mark had been pondering: in essence, a more expansive progression from the moody Krautrock-influenced electronica textures of his two previous albums, 'Blues Funeral' and 'Phantom Radio'. Eventually, Rob Marshall would co-write six of the songs on the new Mark Lanegan Band album. "I was very thankful to become reacquainted with him," Mark deadpans.


    The remainder of the album was written, recorded and produced by Lanegan's longtime musical amanuensis Alain Johannes at his 11 AD base in West Hollywood. Everything was done and dusted within a month, unusually fast by Lanegan's recent standards. "I definitely feel like I'm a better songwriting than I was 15 years ago," he says. "I don't know if I'm just kidding myself or what, but it's definitely easier now to make something that is satisfying to me. Maybe I'm just easier on myself these days, but it's definitely not as painful a process, and therefore I feel I'm better at it now. But part of the way that I stay interested in making music is by collaborating with other people. When I see things through somebody else's perspective it's more exciting than if I'm left to my own devices."


    While sharing roots with its two predecessors, on Gargoyle there's a significant up-shift in the swaggering power load of such keynote songs as Nocturne and Beehive, while the lyrics' tonal palette is more varied. The album title comes from a lyric in Blue Blue Sea - "Gargoyle perched on gothic spire" - and was chosen for its hint of self-deprecation. "I'm most proud of the songs that are atypical to stuff that I've done in the past," says Mark. "So I really like Old Swan, because it's an expression of positivity, which is completely anti-anything I've done before!" He laughs. "Y'know, I haven't played this record for too many people yet. I played it for Greg Dulli, who played on some of it, and he was like, 'Wow, I had to listen to it twice - it sounds like he's having a good time '


    It's been a long journey traveled, not always easy, but in 2017, at the age of 52, Lanegan's got the look of permanence about him. Like that gargoyle on the gothic spire .

    1. Deaths Head Tattoo
    2. Nocturne
    3. Blue Blue Sea
    4. Beehive
    5. Sister
    6. Emperor
    7. Goodbye To Beauty
    8. Drunk On Destruction
    9. First Day Of Winter
    10. Old Swan
    Mark Lanegan
    $23.99
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  • All My Favorite Singers Are Willie Nelson All My Favorite Singers Are Willie Nelson Quick View

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    All My Favorite Singers Are Willie Nelson

    Astral Swan's All My Favorite Singers Are Willie Nelson is a collection of stark psychedelic folk from the unfiltered neuroses of Calgary's Matthew Swann. Songs steeped in universal anguish, marveling at the world's knack for enterprise and cannibalism, come across instead as subtle, reassuring lullabies. These are quiet, relatable anthems for the outsider set, balancing gentle melodies on Swann's self-obsession with moral fallibility. On first single "Beginning Of The End", Swann delves into the album's various drug states in his sweetly apprehensive tone, a lowly guitar dancing loosely with intoxicated children, asking: "Who told the kids in the yard that they're mostly dust? Now they just stay drunk. Keep getting more fucked up".


    Equally inspired by serene 60's folk, 80's no-wave alienation, and the insouciance of 90's grunge, Astral Swans' music is spacious yet constrained, hauntingly personal and oddly sincere. The skeletal "Let Their Faces All Blur Out" races softly with the punk rock abandon of early Sonic Youth and Eric's Trip; "What Calms You Down, Freaks Me Out" bears the ominous pleasance of Syd Barrett, Arthur Russell, Nick Drake, and fellow Calgarian Chad VanGaalen. More structured than Swann's Extra Happy Ghost!!! project (produced by VanGaalen), this album's experimental spirit denies the haphazard "singer-songwriter" label that some might attach to Astral Swans.


    Set for release on Dan Mangan's Madic Records, these twelve songs lavish in Swann's startlingly sardonic reflections, in his own words, "confronting our strange ways of experiencing personhood, in the moral gorge between ideals and inadequacies". Tracked live in Swann's living room, and later embellished in an old Calgary warehouse with local experimental/improv mainstay Brad Hawkins (Ghostkeeper), All My Favorite Singers Are Willie Nelson is flawed if not for its air of accidental perfection, normalizing existential struggle with rhythm and harmony, a natural marriage of the sweet to the acrid.

    1. There Are Ways To Get What You Want
    2. Beginning Of The End
    3. Let Their Faces All Blur Out
    4. Please Don't Leave Me Strange
    5. What Calms You Down, Freaks Me Out
    6. You Carry A Sickness
    7. Park Street
    8. September
    9. Holly
    10. My Conscience Don't Work In The New World
    11. Attention
    12. Grass Girl
    Astral Swans
    $20.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • This World Is Not Enough This World Is Not Enough Quick View

    $19.99
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    This World Is Not Enough

    Since 2010, Elias Bender Rønnenfelt (Iceage, Vår) has used the Marching
    Church moniker to a variety of musical ends, both live and recorded. However,
    the project as it exists on This World Is Not Enough wasn't born until November
    2013. With a live performance looming and no real idea what the set would be,
    Rønnenfelt found a new vision for the band while daydreaming at a gig at the
    venue where Marching Church was set to perform. "What I pictured was me in a
    comfortable armchair, adorned in a golden robe, leading a band while a girl kept
    pouring me champagne when I required it," Rønnenfelt explained. "This raised
    the question, 'What sort of music would go along with this picture?'"


    Rønnenfelt discovered the answer to that question with a lineup rounded out by
    Kristian Emdal and Anton Rothstein of Lower, Cæcilie Trier (Choir of Young
    Believers), Bo H. Hansen (Hand of Dust, Sexdrome) and Frederikke Hoffmeier
    (Puce Mary). Under Rønnenfelt's leadership, the group composed some music,
    rehearsed twice, and played their show. It was decided that night that this incarnation
    of Marching Church would make a record.


    This World Is Not Enough was influenced at first by obscure works like David
    Maranha's experimental drone-rock saga Antarctica, and eventually by soul
    bandleaders like James Brown and Sam Cooke. "The whole month of writing
    and rehearsing and the one week we had in the studio was truly an explosion
    of ideas," Rønnenfelt said. "Improvisation, something I have never worked with
    before, was crucial in the making of this album, considering the loose nature
    of the writing on some of these songs. The album works because of the band's
    incredible ability of breathing life into these, at times, very simple ideas and
    experiments."


    The eight tracks that made the final cut are, in Rønnenfelt's words, "songs of
    nocturnal longing, preposterous self-obsession and cockeyed etiquette," and they
    are an exemplary statement of the songwriter's extraordinary growth since the
    birth of Iceage.

    1. Living in Doubt
    2. King of Song
    3. Hungry for Love
    4. Your Father's Eyes
    5. Calling Out a Name
    6. Every Child (Portrait of Wellman Braud)
    7. Up a Hill
    8. Dark End of the Street
    Marching Church
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Why Do The Heathen Rage? Why Do The Heathen Rage? Quick View

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    Why Do The Heathen Rage?

    Not final cover art


    The Soft Pink Truth is the solo alter ego of Drew Daniel, one half of celebrated Baltimore-based electronic duo Matmos. After a decade of silence in which Daniel concentrated on Matmos and becoming a Shakespeare professor, The Soft Pink Truth is set to release Why Do the Heathen Rage? whose subtitle "Electronic Profanations of Black Metal Classics" reveals its bizarre agenda as an unrequited love letter to a justly divisive genre. A gleeful queer travesty of black metal's undying obsession with kvlt authenticity, Why Do the Heathen Rage? is also a formally precise homage executed with a scholar's obsession. With the guitar chord transcription assistance of Owen Gardner (Teeth Mountain, Horse Lords) and a coven of guest vocalists, including Antony Hegarty and members of Locrian and Wye Oak, Daniel meticulously transposes the riffs, structures and patterns of black metal chestnuts and deep cuts by Darkthrone, Venom, Mayhem, Sarcofago and more into oddly hybrid new forms. Cruising camp absurdity by forcing a sticky tryst between the two mutually incongruous early 90s subcultures of rave and black metal, the results are bracingly strange on first listen, but curiously addictive as the album sinks in.


    Imitating the countless black metal albums that begin with ominous intros, the album commences with "Invocation for Strength", a spoken word track in which a Radical Faery poem used by gay activist Arthur Evans in his classic Witchcraft and the Gay Counterculture is read by Drew Daniel and Antony (Antony and the Johnsons). After this queer hymn, the rhythmic assault begins with an industrial gabber take on Venom's genre-founding song "Black Metal", featuring vocals by Baltimore artist Bryan Collins and screams from Daniel. Stark trap beats and rave synths meet two-step house bounce on "Sadomatic Rites," originally by Beherit, whose electronic opus H418ov21.c was an inspiration to Drew as he was making this album. Adding a witchy twist to an underground metal classic, Jenn Wasner (Wye Oak, Dungeonesse) lends her smoky, soulful voice to an orgasmic house deconstruction of Sarcofago's redlight anthem "Ready to Fuck." After a surprisingly sensitive guitar led intro, "Satanic Black Devotion" erupts with full on screaming vocals from Terence Hannum (Locrian), paired with IDM beats, synthetic banjo, and a rather glaring plunderphonic re-working of a recognizable dancefloor classic. Side Two kicks off with a stark, vogue-ball inspired rethinking of Darkthrone's "Beholding the Throne of Might", with whispered vocals from London based free improviser/composer Jennifer Walshe and a spoken interlude from David Serrotte of the vogue ball crew House of Revlon. The goth factor spikes on "Buried by Time and Dust", in which Daniel's Matmos partner M.C. Schmidt croaks the lyrics to the vampiric Mayhem original on top of MIDI harpsichord while a moldy 808 drops the "Planet Rock" beat. In an Ouroboric final gesture, the album concludes with a paroxysmic take on "Grim and Frostbitten Gay Bar" by Impaled Northern Moonforest, the parodic fake black metal project of Anal Cunt's Seth Putnam. A blizzard of snippets of pop, house, crust and metal are shredded and smothered in lo-fi screaming and arctic field recordings, ending the album on suitably contradictory notes of mockery and celebration. The album's controversial artwork, which will remain redacted for the time being due to the extreme content it portrays, fits those themes as well, depicting a volatile, extremist scene undergoing a long overdue queerification, coming out rich and strange, shiny and pink.


    The Soft Pink Truth was started in 2001 when legendary UK house producer Matthew Herbert challenged Drew to "make a house record," resulting in the project's slyly funky debut album Do You Party?, which Herbert released on his own Soundslike Records. Daniel has also produced floor-burning remixes for Bjork, Herbert, Grizzly Bear, Dat Politics and many more under The Soft Pink Truth moniker. "Why Do The Heathen Rage?" follows his 2004 release "Do You Want New Wave or Do You Want The Soft Pink Truth?," a collection of electronic interpretations of UK punk and American hardcore songs. As a member of Matmos, Daniel continues to break down established norms of experimental and pop music practice by filtering genres through unique and brilliant conceptual lenses, and has established himself as one of the most individualistic electronic musicians of the past several decades.


    Disclaimer: Aesthetics and Politics are neither equivalent nor separable. Black metal fandom all too often entails a tacit endorsement or strategic looking-the-other-way with regards to the racist, anti-Semitic, sexist and homophobic bullshit politics that (still) pervade the scene, on behalf of either escapist fantasy talk, shaky invocations of art as a crypto-religious path to transcendence, or--the oldest cop out in the book--the quietist declaration that "I just like how it sounds." Just as blasphemy both affirms and assaults the sacred powers it invokes and inverts, so too this record celebrates black metal and offers queer critique / mockery / profanation of its ideological morass in equal measure. Mixed emotions about a murky, diverse and self-differential scene are all very well, but, as Barack Obama is so fond of saying at press conferences just before legitimizing drone warfare, let's be clear: No apologies, no excuses, and no escape clauses are hereby offered. Murderers are murderers. No safe space for fascist garbage. The Soft Pink Truth hereby abjures black metal homophobes, racists, and Nazis categorically and absolutely: MAY THIS CURSE BIND! Remember Magne Andreassen!"

    1. Invocation for Strength
    2. Black Metal
    3. Sadomatic Rites
    4. Ready to Fuck
    5. Satanic Black Devotion
    6. Beholding the Throne of Might
    7. Let There Be Ebola Frost
    8. Buried by Time and Dust
    9. Maniac
    10. Grim and Frostbitten Gay Bar
    The Soft Pink Truth
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress) The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

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    The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress)

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like "Death Rider," "The Beast Within," and "Raise The Dead" already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby "Blitz" Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.


    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.


    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. "It just makes sense for us," reflects D.D. "If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing "Grinder," the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work."


    "One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time," seconds Blitz. "Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics."


    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in "Come Heavy" and Iron Maiden in "The Long Road" and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.


    "Punk is huge for Overkill," confirms Verni. "And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world."


    Central to that premise is the incendiary "Let's All Go to Hades" which is sure to become a pit favourite. "This one was a hell of a lot of fun," says Blitz. "You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more."


    Adds D.D., "It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes."


    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is "Our Finest Hour." "It's about the recognition of sameness," explains Ellsworth. "I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune."


    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like "The Long Road." D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. "Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.


    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on "Our Finest Hour," is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.


    "I've had that kind of sound now for a long time," says Verni. "There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars."


    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. "Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds."


    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.


    "That's the strength of the band," explains Blitz. "Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization."


    And Ron? "He's one-of-a-kind," says Verni. "He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it."


    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.


    "I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.


    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.


    "For sure," says Blitz. "One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear."

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) Quick View

    $31.99
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    The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl)

    Pressed On Yellow And Black Vinyl

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like Death Rider, The Beast Within, and Raise The Dead already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby Blitz Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.

    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.

    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. It just makes sense for us, reflects D.D. If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing Grinder, the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work.

    One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time, seconds Blitz. Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics.

    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in Come Heavy and Iron Maiden in The Long Road and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.

    Punk is huge for Overkill, confirms Verni. And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world.

    Central to that premise is the incendiary Let's All Go to Hades which is sure to become a pit favourite. This one was a hell of a lot of fun, says Blitz. You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more.

    Adds D.D., It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes.

    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is Our Finest Hour. It's about the recognition of sameness, explains Ellsworth. I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune.

    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like The Long Road. D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.

    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on Our Finest Hour, is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.

    I've had that kind of sound now for a long time, says Verni. There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars.

    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds.

    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.

    That's the strength of the band, explains Blitz. Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization.

    And Ron? He's one-of-a-kind, says Verni. He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it.

    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.

    I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.

    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.

    For sure, says Blitz. One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear.

    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Why Do The Heathen Rage? (Bend In Cover) Why Do The Heathen Rage? (Bend In Cover) Quick View

    $14.79
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    Why Do The Heathen Rage? (Bend In Cover)

    Not final cover art


    The Soft Pink Truth is the solo alter ego of Drew Daniel, one half of celebrated Baltimore-based electronic duo Matmos. After a decade of silence in which Daniel concentrated on Matmos and becoming a Shakespeare professor, The Soft Pink Truth is set to release Why Do the Heathen Rage? whose subtitle "Electronic Profanations of Black Metal Classics" reveals its bizarre agenda as an unrequited love letter to a justly divisive genre. A gleeful queer travesty of black metal's undying obsession with kvlt authenticity, Why Do the Heathen Rage? is also a formally precise homage executed with a scholar's obsession. With the guitar chord transcription assistance of Owen Gardner (Teeth Mountain, Horse Lords) and a coven of guest vocalists, including Antony Hegarty and members of Locrian and Wye Oak, Daniel meticulously transposes the riffs, structures and patterns of black metal chestnuts and deep cuts by Darkthrone, Venom, Mayhem, Sarcofago and more into oddly hybrid new forms. Cruising camp absurdity by forcing a sticky tryst between the two mutually incongruous early 90s subcultures of rave and black metal, the results are bracingly strange on first listen, but curiously addictive as the album sinks in.


    Imitating the countless black metal albums that begin with ominous intros, the album commences with "Invocation for Strength", a spoken word track in which a Radical Faery poem used by gay activist Arthur Evans in his classic Witchcraft and the Gay Counterculture is read by Drew Daniel and Antony (Antony and the Johnsons). After this queer hymn, the rhythmic assault begins with an industrial gabber take on Venom's genre-founding song "Black Metal", featuring vocals by Baltimore artist Bryan Collins and screams from Daniel. Stark trap beats and rave synths meet two-step house bounce on "Sadomatic Rites," originally by Beherit, whose electronic opus H418ov21.c was an inspiration to Drew as he was making this album. Adding a witchy twist to an underground metal classic, Jenn Wasner (Wye Oak, Dungeonesse) lends her smoky, soulful voice to an orgasmic house deconstruction of Sarcofago's redlight anthem "Ready to Fuck." After a surprisingly sensitive guitar led intro, "Satanic Black Devotion" erupts with full on screaming vocals from Terence Hannum (Locrian), paired with IDM beats, synthetic banjo, and a rather glaring plunderphonic re-working of a recognizable dancefloor classic. Side Two kicks off with a stark, vogue-ball inspired rethinking of Darkthrone's "Beholding the Throne of Might", with whispered vocals from London based free improviser/composer Jennifer Walshe and a spoken interlude from David Serrotte of the vogue ball crew House of Revlon. The goth factor spikes on "Buried by Time and Dust", in which Daniel's Matmos partner M.C. Schmidt croaks the lyrics to the vampiric Mayhem original on top of MIDI harpsichord while a moldy 808 drops the "Planet Rock" beat. In an Ouroboric final gesture, the album concludes with a paroxysmic take on "Grim and Frostbitten Gay Bar" by Impaled Northern Moonforest, the parodic fake black metal project of Anal Cunt's Seth Putnam. A blizzard of snippets of pop, house, crust and metal are shredded and smothered in lo-fi screaming and arctic field recordings, ending the album on suitably contradictory notes of mockery and celebration. The album's controversial artwork, which will remain redacted for the time being due to the extreme content it portrays, fits those themes as well, depicting a volatile, extremist scene undergoing a long overdue queerification, coming out rich and strange, shiny and pink.


    The Soft Pink Truth was started in 2001 when legendary UK house producer Matthew Herbert challenged Drew to "make a house record," resulting in the project's slyly funky debut album Do You Party?, which Herbert released on his own Soundslike Records. Daniel has also produced floor-burning remixes for Bjork, Herbert, Grizzly Bear, Dat Politics and many more under The Soft Pink Truth moniker. "Why Do The Heathen Rage?" follows his 2004 release "Do You Want New Wave or Do You Want The Soft Pink Truth?," a collection of electronic interpretations of UK punk and American hardcore songs. As a member of Matmos, Daniel continues to break down established norms of experimental and pop music practice by filtering genres through unique and brilliant conceptual lenses, and has established himself as one of the most individualistic electronic musicians of the past several decades.


    Disclaimer: Aesthetics and Politics are neither equivalent nor separable. Black metal fandom all too often entails a tacit endorsement or strategic looking-the-other-way with regards to the racist, anti-Semitic, sexist and homophobic bullshit politics that (still) pervade the scene, on behalf of either escapist fantasy talk, shaky invocations of art as a crypto-religious path to transcendence, or--the oldest cop out in the book--the quietist declaration that "I just like how it sounds." Just as blasphemy both affirms and assaults the sacred powers it invokes and inverts, so too this record celebrates black metal and offers queer critique / mockery / profanation of its ideological morass in equal measure. Mixed emotions about a murky, diverse and self-differential scene are all very well, but, as Barack Obama is so fond of saying at press conferences just before legitimizing drone warfare, let's be clear: No apologies, no excuses, and no escape clauses are hereby offered. Murderers are murderers. No safe space for fascist garbage. The Soft Pink Truth hereby abjures black metal homophobes, racists, and Nazis categorically and absolutely: MAY THIS CURSE BIND! Remember Magne Andreassen!"

    1. Invocation for Strength
    2. Black Metal
    3. Sadomatic Rites
    4. Ready to Fuck
    5. Satanic Black Devotion
    6. Beholding the Throne of Might
    7. Let There Be Ebola Frost
    8. Buried by Time and Dust
    9. Maniac
    10. Grim and Frostbitten Gay Bar
    The Soft Pink Truth
    $14.79
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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