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Oscar Brown Jr

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  • Sin & Soul (Speakers Corner) Sin & Soul (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Sin & Soul (Speakers Corner)

    When Oscar Brown died at the age of 78 in 2005, one journalist at least, from The New York Times, was unsure as to how to describe the artist to whom America had just bid a final farewell. To write in his obituary that he was a jazz singer seemed too platitudinous, because Brown didn't just sing his songs, he performed them. But it would have been just as wrong to honour him as a jazz songwriter, despite his collaborations with Miles Davis and Max Roach, because he was more closely associated with gospel, folk and blues.
    His vocal qualities lie in a recitative-like, dry declamation, sharp as a knife, as is clearly heard in Work Song. The pain brought on by life's adversities can be cried out internally even if you appear to remain unaffected outwardly (But I Was Cool). A portion of sarcasm is necessary when the singsong of a slave trader constantly calls for higher bids (Bid 'Em In), and when a babbling child can pester its daddy with both banal and existential questions (Dat Dere).



    The generously manned band does not often play all together as in the springy Signifyin' Monkey. Here we have just a few chords on the piano (Watermelon Man), there a gently plucked guitar (Brown Baby), or a quiet pulsating rhythm (Afro Blue) - very often not much more was needed for a sin and soul performance by Oscar Brown, who, by the way, and so typically American, regarded himself as an Entertainer.



    Musicians:



    • Oscar Brown Jr. (vocal)

    • Phil Bodner (saxophone)

    • Billy Butterfield (trumpet)

    • Floyd Morris (piano)

    • Don Arnone (guitar)

    • George Duvivier (bass)

    • Osie Johnson (drums)




    Recording: June - October 1960




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Work Song
    2. But I Was Cool
    3. Bid 'em High
    4. Signifyin' Monkey
    5. Watermelon Man
    6. Somebody By Me A Drink
    7. Rags and Old Iron
    8. Dat Dere
    9. Brown Baby
    10. Humdrum Blues
    11. Sleepy
    12. Afro Blue
    Oscar Brown Jr.
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Movin' On Movin' On Quick View

    $14.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Movin' On

    1. A Dime Away From A Hotdog

    2. Walk Away
    3. Feel The Fire
    4. A Ladiesman
    5. No Place To Be Somebody
    6. To Stay In Good With You
    7. Gang Bang
    8. First Lady
    9. Young Man
    Oscar Brown, Jr.
    $14.99
    Vinyl LP Reissue - Sealed Buy Now
  • Portrait Of Sheila Portrait Of Sheila Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Portrait Of Sheila

    During the Blue Note 75th anniversary celebration the label released 100 essential Blue Note LPs and asked New York Times readers what titles they'd like to see make the list. This album is one of five new reissues that were hand-selected by Blue Note President, Don Was, based on New York Times reader recommendations.


    Sheila Jordan's debut recording was one of the very few vocal records made for Blue Note during Alfred Lion's reign. Accompanied by the subtle guitarist Barry Galbraith, bassist Steve Swallow, and drummer Denzil Best, Jordan sounds quite distinctive, cool-toned, and adventurous during her classic date. Her interpretations of Oscar Brown, Jr.'s Hum Drum Blues and 11 standards (including Falling in Love With Love, Dat Dere, Baltimore Oriole, and I'm a Fool to Want You) are both swinging and haunting. Possibly because of her originality, Sheila Jordan would not record again for over a dozen years, making this highly recommended set quite historic.

    - Scott Yanow (All Music)

    1. Falling In Love With Love
    2. If You Could See Me Now
    3. Am I Blue
    4. Dat Dere
    5. When The World Was Young
    6. Let's Face The Music And Dance
    7. Laugh, Clown, Laugh
    8. Who Can I Turn To
    9. Baltimore Oriole
    10. I'm A Fool To Want You
    11. Hum Drum Blues
    12. Willow Weep For Me
    Sheila Jordan
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sin & Soul (Speakers Corner) (Bend In Cover) Sin & Soul (Speakers Corner) (Bend In Cover) Quick View

    $27.99
    x

    Sin & Soul (Speakers Corner) (Bend In Cover)

    When Oscar Brown died at the age of 78 in 2005, one journalist at least, from The New York Times, was unsure as to how to describe the artist to whom America had just bid a final farewell. To write in his obituary that he was a jazz singer seemed too platitudinous, because Brown didn't just sing his songs, he performed them. But it would have been just as wrong to honour him as a jazz songwriter, despite his collaborations with Miles Davis and Max Roach, because he was more closely associated with gospel, folk and blues.
    His vocal qualities lie in a recitative-like, dry declamation, sharp as a knife, as is clearly heard in Work Song. The pain brought on by life's adversities can be cried out internally even if you appear to remain unaffected outwardly (But I Was Cool). A portion of sarcasm is necessary when the singsong of a slave trader constantly calls for higher bids (Bid 'Em In), and when a babbling child can pester its daddy with both banal and existential questions (Dat Dere).



    The generously manned band does not often play all together as in the springy Signifyin' Monkey. Here we have just a few chords on the piano (Watermelon Man), there a gently plucked guitar (Brown Baby), or a quiet pulsating rhythm (Afro Blue) - very often not much more was needed for a sin and soul performance by Oscar Brown, who, by the way, and so typically American, regarded himself as an Entertainer.



    Musicians:



    • Oscar Brown Jr. (vocal)

    • Phil Bodner (saxophone)

    • Billy Butterfield (trumpet)

    • Floyd Morris (piano)

    • Don Arnone (guitar)

    • George Duvivier (bass)

    • Osie Johnson (drums)




    Recording: June - October 1960




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Work Song
    2. But I Was Cool
    3. Bid 'em High
    4. Signifyin' Monkey
    5. Watermelon Man
    6. Somebody By Me A Drink
    7. Rags and Old Iron
    8. Dat Dere
    9. Brown Baby
    10. Humdrum Blues
    11. Sleepy
    12. Afro Blue
    Oscar Brown Jr.
    $27.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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