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  • MFSL Original Master Record Sleeves (50) MFSL Original Master Record Sleeves (50) Quick View

    $19.99
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    MFSL Original Master Record Sleeves (50)


    Quantity Discounts Available:


    2+ Packs - $18 each

    4+ Packs - $17 each

    10+ Packs - $16 each

    20+ Packs - $15 each



    Please update quantity in cart to receive discount.


    Imitation is the highest form of flattery, but don't be fooled! Only the Original Master Sleeves from Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab offer the finest protection for your valuable records. These imported, three-ply, anti-static, premium record sleeves have been used in MFSL LP packaging for decades and now you can use them to care for all your vinyl!

    Mobile Fidelity
    $19.99
    Rice Paper Record Sleeves Buy Now
  • Mobile Fidelity's PURE Record Rinse Mobile Fidelity's PURE Record Rinse Quick View

    $19.99
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    Mobile Fidelity's PURE Record Rinse

    Mobile Fidelity PURE RECORD RINSE is the Purest of All Record Rinses... PERIOD! You Cannot Find a Fluid Anywhere this... PURE!


    Recommended as a Final Rinse Stage to Be Used With ANY Record Cleaning Solution to Remove Any and All Residual Detergents and Debris!


    Mobile Fidelity's PURE Record Rinse is the purest water you can find for cleaning records. Ultra-high purity Mobile Fidelity PURE Record Rinse is also used as the base of our other record cleaning fluids and is perfect for use as the final rinse step before putting LPs back into their sleeves (preferably into MoFi inner sleeves!).


    Every serious vinyl fan knows you should never rinse your records with tap water. Tap water contains trace minerals, chemicals and microscopic organic matter all of which can be deposited in freshly cleaned grooves. Bottled water comes from either the same sources as tap water or from natural springs which have an even larger amount of minerals.


    Purified water isnt subject to the same restrictions and regulations that apply to food or drugs, so purified doesn't necesarily mean PURE. Distilled water without additives is harder to find than ever and even water that has been distilled once or twice can still have contaminants.


    We highly recommend rinsing with Mobile Fidelity PURE Record Rinse. PURE is water that has gone through four stages of deionization, after which it is triple-distilled, then treated with high intensity ultraviolet light to kill all bacteria and microbiological particles. This leaves nothing in PURE to damage your vinyl.


    Mobile Fidelity has a history of setting industry standards. Now, we are the first to provide this extraordinary level of quality in our rinse water. Call us today to learn more about how analog lovers can benefit from Mobile Fidelity PURE Record Rinse.

    Mobile Fidelity
    $19.99
    32 oz. Record Cleaning Solution Buy Now
  • Little Feat (On Sale) Little Feat (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $34.99 $31.49 Save $3.50 (10%)

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    Little Feat (On Sale)

    Little Feat's self-titled debut instantly established the band as a fresh slice of musical Americana. Steeped in their love of rock, R&B, blues and country with just a pinch of New Orleans spice - the album received nearly unanimous critical acclaim!

    *
    New liner notes by legendary producer Russ Titelman. (Mofi exclusive)

    *
    Numbered Limited Edition Japanese Mini Sleeve gatefold packaging


    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Snakes on Everything

    2. Strawberry Flats

    3. Truck Stop Girl

    4. Brides of Jesus

    5. Willin'

    6. Hamburger Midnight

    7. Forty Four Blues/How Many More years

    8. Crack in Your Door

    9. I've Been the One

    10. Takin' My Time

    11. Crazy Captain Gunboat Willie

    Little Feat
    $34.99 $31.49 Save $3.50 (10%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Nylon Curtain (On Sale) The Nylon Curtain (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $49.99 $44.99 Save $5.00 (10%)

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    The Nylon Curtain (On Sale)

    The Nylon Curtain on Numbered Limited Edition 180 Gram 45RPM 2LP from Mobile Fidelity


    Legendary Singer-Songwriter Channels John Lennon on Musically Ambitious and Socially Poignant Baby Boomer-Themed Set


    Mobile Fidelity Edition Broadens Expanse of Orchestral Arrangements, Sweep of Melodic Breadth, and Microdynamic Reach


    Multi-Platinum 1982 Song Cycle Includes "Allentown," "Laura," "Pressure," "Goodnight Saigon"


    Having triumphantly asserted himself as a take-no-mess singer-songwriter on 1980's hard-rocking Glass Houses, Billy Joel continues to push his creative impulses on The Nylon Curtain, a fascinating song cycle that pays tribute to John Lennon and stands as the most ambitious project of his career. Enriched by sweeping orchestral arrangements and socially conscious lyrics, the 1982 set addresses unemployment, war, and realities of the Reagan era with exacting precision. Insightful and clever, the album's Baby Boomer-themed narratives continue to resonate.


    A requisite piece of Mobile Fidelity's Billy Joel catalog restoration series, The Nylon Curtain is mastered from the original master tapes and pressed on 180 gram LP at RTI. The myriad nuances amidst Phil Ramone's crisp production assume greater tonality, texture, and detail. What was a very good-sounding album is now an audiophile-caliber favorite, with transparency, clarity, and microdynamics enhancing the poignant connection between Joel's expressiveness and the listener's emotions. The Nylon Curtain is now an even more personal experience, a brilliant distillation of sadness, loss, hope, and anger.


    Harnessing concerns, obsessions, reflections, and feelings that consumed a majority of the Baby Boomer generation near the beginning of the Reagan Era, Joel delves into job loss ("Allentown"), wartime fallout ("Goodbye Saigon"), and, of course, romantic longing ("She's Right on Time"). Rather than take a long-view perspective, Joel gets up and close to the issues, infusing the fare with a mix of sadness, frustration, cautious optimism, and moodiness that he wears on his sleeve. Joel's melodies, too, ricochet with unmistakably personal sentiment, as he constructs arrangements in tribute to Lennon, whose ghost arises on pieces like "Scandinavian Skies" and "Laura."


    Pop culture author Chuck Klosterman addresses the Beatles link and The Nylon Curtain's timeless appeal in Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs, writing: "'Laura' and 'Where's the Orchestra' really are as good as what's on The White Album. This is because the first song says things so directly that its words shouldn't make sense to anyone else (and yet they do), while the latter is so metaphorically vague that anybody should be able to understand what he's implying."


    But relate and understand audiences do: The Nylon Curtain remains a pop marvel, introspective juggernaut, and finally, courtesy of Mobile Fidelity, a sonic landmark. Joel's anguish, regrets, sorrow, and worries transcend both tastes and time. Somewhat underappreciated upon its original release, the 55-minute effort is now regarded as a conceptual masterpiece.


    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Allentown
    2. Laura
    3. Pressure
    4. Goodnight Saigon
    5. She's Right on Time
    6. A Room of Our Own
    7. Surprises
    8. Scandinavian Skies
    9. Where's the Orchestra
    Billy Joel
    $49.99 $44.99 Save $5.00 (10%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP 45 RPM - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Weezer (Green Album) (Awaiting Repress) (On Sale) Weezer (Green Album) (Awaiting Repress) (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $34.99 $31.49 Save $3.50 (10%)

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    Weezer (Green Album) (Awaiting Repress) (On Sale)

    Weezer (Green Album) on Numbered Limited Edition 180 Gram LP from Mobile Fidelity


    Concise, Tightly Played 2001 Power-Pop Album Features Back-to-Basics Approach


    Weezer's Fastest-Selling Release Includes "Hash Pipe," "Island in the Sun," "Don't Let Go"


    Record Launched One of Most Memorable Return-from-the-Dead Comebacks in History


    Mastered from the Original Master Tapes: Smooth, Big-Guitar Sound Resonates Like Never Before


    Weezer's self-titled third album, collectively known as the Green Album, nearly never came to pass. The band had all but broken apart, with leader Rivers Cuomo choosing to go back to college and the other members dismayed at the initial reception to 1996's Pinkerton. Persuaded at the turn of the century to return to the concert stage, the foursome launched one of the most enduring comeback stories in history, and in the process, penned 75 songs, the choicest of which grace 2001's concise, tightly played Green Album.


    Mastered from the original master tapes and pressed on 180 gram LP at RTI, Mobile Fidelity's reissue presents the music with by far the most dynamic range it's ever enjoyed. Cars icon Ric Ocasek's production comes into fuller relief, with guitar notes ringing with front-to-back depth and superb imaging. Cuomo's singing gains focus and clarity, and the rhythms that help give the tunes their incessant catchiness are better defined, with the low end finally present.


    That nearly everything on Green Album-from the cover to the producer to sonics-reflects those of Weezer's blockbuster debut isn't merely coincidence. The quartet, not yet realizing that Pinkerton had already become a cult classic (and, soon after, would be hailed as one of the most prized albums of its generation), intentionally pursued a back-to-basics approach that echoed its roots. Unadorned simplicity, skyscraper-sized hooks, and short-but-sweet arrangements are the hallmarks here, each a signpost on how rock albums can work their way into a listener's head and provide limitless satisfaction.


    Of course, however crucial, the music is just one component in Weezer's arsenal. Akin to its sibling efforts, Green Album wouldn't be the same devoid of Cuomo's lyrics, which exude charming personality and boyish awkwardness. Absent is the heart-on-a-sleeve obviousness of the fare of Pinkerton. The material here echoes with a related emotional universality whereby romantic yearning, fear of rejection, and getaway fantasies spark with the winking promise of enthusiasm and attainment. There's a reason every passage remains so accessible; playfulness and wryness abound. Power-pop efforts don't come more perfect.


    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Don't Let Go
    2. Photograph
    3. Hash Pipe
    4. Island in the Sun
    5. Crab
    6. Knock-Down Drag-Out
    7. Smile
    8. Simple Pages
    9. Glorious Day
    10. O Girlfriend
    Weezer
    $34.99 $31.49 Save $3.50 (10%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Every Picture Tells A Story (Awaiting Repress) (On Sale) Every Picture Tells A Story (Awaiting Repress) (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $24.99 $22.49 Save $2.50 (10%)

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    Every Picture Tells A Story (Awaiting Repress) (On Sale)

    Numbered Limited Edition



    Ranked 172/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.


    Rod the Mod's Definitive Album: Timeless Feel-Good Set Contains Eternal Chart-Topper Maggie May, Introspective (Find A) Reason to Believe



    Stewart's Band Includes His Faces Mates: Ron Wood, Ian McLagan Shine



    Mastered on Mobile Fidelity's World-Renowned Mastering System and Pressed at RTI (The Best Plant in America): LP Boasts Organic Warmth and Full-Range Extension



    Rod Stewart owned the early 1970s. When he wasn't recording great sets with the Faces, he was redefining how folk, country, and soul music could be folded under rock's umbrella. Filled with first-rate originals and terrific interpretations of classics, Every Picture Tells A Story remains Stewart's watershed moment, a brilliant synthesis of organic warmth, earthy tones, raucous romance, and loose performances. Those who only know Stewart from his later evolution into a sappy balladeer will be overwhelmed.



    Mastered on Mobile Fidelity's world-renowned mastering system and pressed at RTI (the best record plant in America), MoFi Silver Labels' numbered limited edition LP presents the 1971 smash in the most transparent, warm, and full-range sound the music has ever enjoyed. Stewart's supremely soulful vocals come on with insouciant passion and joyous persuasion, the detail allowing listeners to hear into his lungs and feel every breath he draws. His equally superb band is presented amidst an expanded soundstage that's free of artificial ceilings and harshness introduced by several digital remastering editions. The explosive sound is akin to watching a fledgling group come into its own in a small club.



    Kicking up the tempo and slightly increasing the edge from his previous solo effort, Stewart transforms blues, folk, country, and soul into a hard-rocking hybrid that maintains acoustic properties but isn't afraid to step out and report on what it's like to have a night out on the town. Anchored by Mick Waller's free-swinging percussion, every song triumphs, with Stewart's slightly hoarse and eminently emotive vocals communicating each word as if they're literally sewn as hearts on his sleeve. Ron Wood's slide guitar and gritty chords complement the singer's earnest conviction, and Ian McLagan's organ adds bittersweet accents. Nothing here is blue; Every Picture Tells A Story is a celebration.



    Stewart combines American and British folk styles on the strolling Mandolin Wind, the touching song epitomizing the simple, direct approach that underpins the entire album. On the breathless title track, Stewart embraces his inner playboy, the tune's likable crude-and-rude swagger sent up on crackling rhythms and visceral harmonies. The British native handles Bob Dylan's Tomorrow Is A Long Time and the evergreen That's All Right as if he wrote them. The best aspect of Every Picture Tells A Story relates to how genuine and believable Stewart and his good-natured company sound throughout.

    If you are a fan of rock, soul, folk, or the blues, you owe it to yourself to have a superb copy of this timeless record that shows off its translucent and organic tones, extraordinary vocal performances, and crack backing band. Mobile Fidelity's Silver Label numbered limited edition LP does just that. And it restores one of the most iconic album covers in history. As for that Classic Edition statement that's always hovered at the top of the record? Never truer than now.


    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Every Picture Tells a Story (Rod Stewart, Ronnie Wood)
    2. Seems Like a Long Time (Theodore Anderson)
    3. That's All Right (Arthur Crudup)
    4. Amazing Grace
    5. Tomorrow Is a Long Time (Bob Dylan)
    6. O. Henry (Martin Quittenton)
    7. Maggie May (Rod Stewart, Martin Quittenton)
    8. Mandolin Wind (Rod Stewart)
    9. I Know) I'm Losing You (Norman Whitfield, Eddie Holland, Cornelius Grant)
    10. Reason to Believe (Tim Hardin)
    Rod Stewart
    $24.99 $22.49 Save $2.50 (10%)
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Blues Jam At Chess (Pure Pleasure) Blues Jam At Chess (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Blues Jam At Chess (Pure Pleasure)

    No introduction needed for this fabulous release. Arguably one of the greatest blues recordings laid down in the last 40 years! Just checking out the personnel above says it all. Originally released on Mike Vernon's highly collectable and revered Blue Horizon label in 1969, this pressing will become a must for all serious collectors and muso's alike!




    Musicians:



    • Fleetwood Mac

    • Otis Spann

    • Willie Dixon

    • Shakey Horton

    • J.T. Brown

    • Guitar Buddy

    • Honey Boy Edwards

    • S.P. Leary




    Recording: January 1969 at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago

    Production: Mike Vernon and Marshall Chess



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Side One

    1. Watch Out

    2. South Indiana - Take 1

    3. South Indiana - Take 2

    4. Last Night

    5. Red Hot Jam



    Side Two

    6. I'm Worried

    7. I Held My Baby Last Night

    8. Madison Blues

    9. I Can't Hold

    10. I Need Your Love

    11. I Got the Blues



    Side Three

    12. World's in a Tangle

    13. Talk with You

    14. Like it This Way

    15. Someday Soon Baby

    16. Hungry Country Girl



    Side Four

    17. Black Jack Blues

    18. Everyday I Have the Blues

    19. Rockin' Boogie

    20. Sugar Mama

    21. Homework

    Fleetwood Mac
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Blue Light 'Til Dawn (Pure Pleasure) Blue Light 'Til Dawn (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Blue Light 'Til Dawn (Pure Pleasure)

    Cassandra Wilson started out as a jazz singer, doing gigs with several innovative bands (including Brooklyn's experimental M-Base collective) and at the same time recording typical jazz-singer let-me-entertain-you stuff - Night and Day and Blue Skies and shooby dooby dooby. Eventually the Mississippi-born New York-based vocalist, who reigned among the elite jazz singers of the 1980s, became restless, and began to look beyond torch songs for inspiration.




    Musicians:



    • Cassandra Wilson (vocal)

    • Don Byron (clarinet)

    • Olu Dara (cornet)

    • Brandon Ross, Chris Whitley (guitar)

    • Charlie Burnham (violin, mandocello)

    • Kenny Davis, Lonnie Plaxico (bass)

    • Tony Cedras (accordion)

    • Lance Carter, Bill McClellan (drums, percussion)



    Format: 2 LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. You Don't Know What Love Is
    2. Come On In My Kitchen
    3. Tell Me You'll Wait For Me
    4. Children of the Night
    5. Hellhound On My Trail
    6. Black Crow
    7. Sankofa
    8. Estrellas
    9. Redbone
    10. Tupelo Honey
    11. Blue Light 'Til Dawn
    12. I Can't Stand The Rain
    Cassandra Wilson
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner) Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner)

    It was clear from the start that Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, with its air of solemnity in the final chorus, which calls for brotherly love just as the New Year comes in, would become a musical part of our world's cultural legacy. Hundreds of minds, Beethoven researcher Karl Nef prophesied, have been set in motion by this music in the most varied ways, and it will continue not only to bestow pleasure upon countless thousands, but also to stimulate mental life right at the most fundamental level.



    There are certainly only a very few truly cerebral interpretations which stand out from the fathomless mass of recordings. One of those upon which "The Absolute Sound" journal has stamped its coveted seal of approval is the recording with Georg Solti and his perfectly honed symphony musicians from Chicago. Here, this usually somewhat daring baton-wielder plumbs the very depths of the score and allows Beethoven's rich abundance of ideas to ferment into a great whole.



    The four soloists prove their worth as first choice for the richly detailed and balanced synopsis of this fissured work. They captivate us as much in the solo as in the group singing with their natural and expressive intonation. The dry, very present sound highlights the fact that this is an artistic performance at the highest level.




    Musicians:



    • Pilar Lorengar, Stuart Burrows, and other soloists

    • The Chicago Symphony Chorus & Orchestra

    • Sir Georg Solti (conductor)




    Recording: May 1972 in the Krannert Centre of the University of Illinois, Chicago, by Kenneth Wilkinson and Gordon Parry

    Production: David Harvey



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    Ludwig Van Beethoven
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • How Hi The Fi (Pure Pleasure) How Hi The Fi (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    How Hi The Fi (Pure Pleasure)

    The Buck Clayton LP "How Hi The Fi" was the first issue in 1954 from the famous Buck Clayton jam sessions. It was recorded at Columbia's 30th Street Studios, which was one of the greatest recording sites in the world (the studio has since been abandoned, which must be one of the most stupid decisions executed by the corporate record industry), with a sound that's still instantly recognisable. These Buck Clayton jam sessions were among the first large scale projects to utilise the potential of the new LP technology.



    The exciting music on this long out-of-print LP is now available again on 180gram vinyl, with the cuts How Hi The Fi and Blue Moon being the most memorable. Buck and fellow musicians are all in inspired form. The most memorable soloists are the rambunctious Trummy Young, the harmonically advanced chordings of Jimmy Jones and an exuberant Woody Herman who was rarely heard in this type of jam session setting. With Clayton having worked out some ensemble riffs for the horns beforehand and plenty of space left for spontaneity, this music is timeless magic.



    Musicians:



    • Buck Clayton, Joe Newman (trumpet)

    • Urbie Green, Benny Powell (trombone)

    • Woody Herman (clarinet)

    • Julian Dash, Al Cohn (tenor saxophone)

    • Jimmy Jones (piano)

    • Steve Jordan (guitar)

    • Walter Page (bass)

    • Jo Jones (drums)




    Recording: December 1953 and March 1954 at Columbia Studios, New York

    Production: George Avakian and John Hammond



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Side 1:


    How Hi The Fi and Blue Moon

    recorded March 31st 1954
    Buck Clayton
    Joe Thomas : trumpet

    Urbie Green
    Trummy Young : trombone

    Woody Herman : clarinet
    Lem Davis : alto saxophone
    Julian Dash
    Al Cohn : tenor saxophone

    Jimmy Jones : piano
    Steve Jordan : guitar
    Walter Page : bass
    Jo Jones : drums


    Side 2:


    Sentimental Journey and Moten Swing
    recorded December 14th 1953
    Buck Clayton
    Joe Newman : trumpet

    Urbie Green
    Benny Powell : trombone

    Lem Davis : alto saxophone
    Julian Dash : tenor saxophone
    Charlie Fowlkes : baritone saxophone

    Sir Charles Thompson : piano
    Freddie Green : guitar
    Walter Page : bass
    Jo Jones : drums

    Buck Clayton
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Duke Ellington's 70th Birthday Concert (Pure Pleasure) Duke Ellington's 70th Birthday Concert (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Duke Ellington's 70th Birthday Concert (Pure Pleasure)

    This double LP ranks as one of Duke Ellington's finest recordings of his final decade. The live performance gives listeners a good idea as to just how Duke's ensemble sounded in concert, and it serves as both a retrospective and a display of the strengths of Ellington's mighty band. Among the many highlights are definitive renditions of Rockin' in Rhythm and Take the 'A' Train (the latter has some wonderful Cootie Williams trumpet), a few features for altoist Johnny Hodges, a tenor battle on In Triplicate, a few guest spots for organist Wild Bill Davis, and a 16-and-a-half-minute, nine-song medley that really works well. The most memorable chorus of all is an incredible high-note display by Cat Anderson on Satin Doll that is arguably his most miraculous solo ever; each note he hits is virtually impossible to play on the trumpet, and is in tune, too. This gem is essential for all serious jazz collections.



    Musicians:



    • Duke Ellington (piano)

    • Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope (saxophone)

    • Cat Anderson, Mercer Ellington (trumpet)

    • Lawrence Brown (trombone)

    • Wild Bill Davis (organ)

    • Victor Gaskin (bass)

    • Rufus "Speedy" Jones (drums)




    Recording: November 1969 live by Bob Auger

    Production: Noel Walker



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Side one:


    Rockin In Rhythm
    B.P.
    Take The A Train

    Tootie For Cootie


    Side Two:


    4:30 Blues
    El Gato
    Black Butterfly

    Things Aint What They Used To Be

    Laying On Mellow


    Side Three:


    Satin Doll
    Azure
    In Triplicate

    Perdido
    Fifi



    Side Four:


    Medley:
    Prelude To A Kiss

    Im Just A Lucky So And So

    I Let A Song Go Out Of My Heart
    Do Nothin Til You Hear From Me
    Just Squeeze Me
    Dont Get Around Much Anymore

    Mood Indigo
    Sophisticated Lady

    Caravan
    Black Swan
    Final Ellington Speech

    Duke Ellington
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Painting Signs (Pure Pleasure) Painting Signs (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $44.99
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    Painting Signs (Pure Pleasure)

    Painting Signs stands up as a complete work from beginning to end. Eric Bibb makes a fine case for blues as a music of introspection, warmth, and supreme nuance. Easily his most mature album to date, Painting Signs continues Bibb's formula of socially aware songs performed from an acutely personal point-of-view; standout tracks Don't Ever Let Nobody Drag Your Spirit Down and a cover of Hope In A Hopeless World hammer home his message of individual freedom and the responsibilities that accompany it. (It's no coincidence that Pops Staples, to whom Bibb dedicates this album, once recorded the latter song.) That's not to say Painting Signs is overly didactic or, indeed, 'heavy' in any way; even the most serious songs here, like the plea for peace and unity Got To Do Better, are leavened by a musical backdrop that's soulful and immediately accessible. Gospel-leaning backing vocals by Linda Tillery and her Cultural Heritage Choir help flesh out several cuts, and robust accordion fills by Bibb's longtime accompanist Janne Petersson add a subtle Louisiana flavor to the rolling, propulsive Kokomo and, to surprisingly good effect, the deep-grooved version of Jimmy Reed's Honest I Do. Elsewhere, he keeps a minimalist tone dominated by acoustic guitar, an arrangement that's particularly mesmerizing on the chilling title track. With its emphasis on sophisticated songcraft and its gentle blend of folk, gospel, and country influences, Painting Signs presents Bibb as an artist intent on blurring the line between blues and 'roots music' in general.



    Musicians:



    • Eric Bibb (vocal, guitar)

    • Wilson Pickett (vocal)

    • Dave Bronze (bass, guitar, vocal)

    • Robbie McIntosh (guitar)

    • Hans Theesink (mandolin)

    • Janne Petersson (organ, piano, electric piano, accordion)

    • Henry Spinetti (drums)

    • Linda Tillery & The Cultural Heritage Choir (backing vocal)



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Kokomo
    2. Hope In A Hopeless World
    3. Five Miles Above
    4. I Heard The Angels Singing

    5. Delia's Gone
    6. Got To Do Better
    7. The Light Was Worth The Candle

    8. Angel
    9. Walkin' Home

    10. To Know You
    11. Honest I Do
    12. Paintin' Signs
    13. Don't Ever Let Nobody Drag Your Spirit Down
    Eric Bibb
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Concierto (Pure Pleasure) Concierto (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $44.99
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    Concierto (Pure Pleasure)

    Jim Hall's Concierto was arguably a masterpiece and possibly the greatest LP in the history of CTI. With two legendary players in the frontline, trumpeter Chet Baker and Paul Desmond, Hall interprets standards and engaging originals. A master of melody who never wastes notes, the centerpiece for this release is Hall's interpretation of one movement from Rodrigo's Guitar Concerto, arranged by Don Sebesky. New tracks include alternate takes of You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To and Rock Skippin', plus Unfinished Business, an incomplete track that fades following Desmond's solo just as Hall starts to play (This song is actually La Paloma Azul, a Mexican folk tune played by Paul Desmond while with the Dave Brubeck Quartet about a decade earlier, also known as The Blue Dove).



    Musicians:



    • Jim Hall (guitar)

    • Chet Baker (trumpet)

    • Paul Desmond (alto saxophone)

    • Roland Hanna (piano)

    • Ron Carter (bass)

    • Steve Gadd (drums)



    Recording: April 1975 at Van Gelder's Recording Studio, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., USA by Rudy Van Gelder

    Production: Creed Taylor



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To
    2. Two's Blues
    3. The Answer Is Yes

    4. Concierto de Aranjuez
    5. Rock Skippin'
    6. Unfinished Business

    Bonus Tracks
    7. You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To (alternate take)

    8. The Answer Is Yes (alternate take)
    9. Rock Skippin' (alternate take)
    Jim Hall
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Plays W.C. Handy (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Plays W.C. Handy (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Plays W.C. Handy (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress)

    The excellence of Louis' band is so high and so consistent that every man deserves commendation for his part in making this remarkably fine record. Trummy Young particularly should be singled out for his driving solos and for the way he 'boots' Louis in the final ensembles. The way I feel about this record can be summed up in this way: When I die, I want people to say, "That's the guy that if it hadn't been for him and Louis Armstrong and W. C. Handy, there wouldn't have been that great record, Louis Armstrong Plays W. C. Handy."
    (excerpt from the sleeve notes by George Avakian)



    Musicians:



    • Louis Armstrong (trumpet, vocal)

    • Velma Middleton (vocal)

    • Trummy Young (trombone)

    • Barney Bigard (clarinet)

    • Billy Kyle (piano)

    • Arvell Shaw (bass)

    • Barrett Deems (drums)



    Recording: July 1954 by Mason Coppinger
    Production: George Avakian




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. St Louis Blues
    2. Yellow Dog Blues
    3. Loveless Love
    4. Aunt Hagars Blues
    5. Long Gone (From Bowling Green)
    6. Memphis Blues
    7. Beale Street Blues
    8. Ole Miss Blues
    9. Chantez Les Bas (Sing Em Low)
    10. Hesitating Blues
    11. Atlanta Blues (Make Me One Pallet On Your Floor)

    12. George Avakians Interview With W.C. Handy

    13. Loveless Love (rehearsal sequence)
    14. Hesitating Blues (rehearsal sequence)
    15. Alligator Story
    16. Long Gone (From Bowling Green) (rehearsal sequence)
    Louis Armstrong
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Couldn't Stand The Weather (Pure Pleasure) Couldn't Stand The Weather (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
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    Couldn't Stand The Weather (Pure Pleasure)

    With his astonishingly accomplished guitar playing, Stevie Ray Vaughan ignited the blues revival of the '80's. Vaughan drew equally from bluesmen like Albert King, Otis Rush, and Muddy Waters and rock & roll players like Jimi Hendrix and Lonnie Mack, as well as the stray jazz guitarist like Kenny Burrell, developing a uniquely eclectic and fiery style that sounded like no other guitarist, regardless of genre. Vaughan bridged the gap between blues and rock like no other artist had since the late '60s. For the next seven years, Stevie Ray was the leading light in American blues, consistently selling out concerts while his albums regularly went gold. His tragic death in 1990 only emphasized his influence in blues and American rock & roll.

    Musicians:



    • Stevie Ray Vaughan (vocal, guitar)

    • Jimmie Vaughan (guitar)

    • Stan Harrison (tenor saxophone)

    • Tommy Shannon (bass)

    • Chris "Whipper" Layton, Fran Christina (drums)



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / standard sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    Side 1
    1. Scuttlebuttin'
    2. Couldn't Stand The Weather
    3. Things That I Used To Do


    Side 2
    4. Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)
    5. Cold Shot


    Side 3
    6. Tin Pan Alley
    7. Honey Bee
    8. Stang's Swang


    Side 4
    9. SRV Speaks
    10. Hide Away
    11. Look at Little Sister
    12. Give Me Back My Wig
    13. Come On (Pt.3)

    Stevie Ray Vaughan
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure) Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure)

    The material - many of the Dylan classics - is unsurpassable. Her voice is at its zenith, young, supple - neither undisciplined (as in her 1st records) nor the later, low vibrato warble. There is none of the self-conscious and silly Dylan vocal imitation found in Baez's later recording. Where Dylan's own singing is wonderfully raw and rough, Baez is clear and pure. Both are great for me, but very, very different from each other. These lovely renditions are like no one else's. Just pure Joan in her finest voice.



    She is backed here by several of the very best of '70s Nashville session musicians (pickers). Some folks think of Nashville sidemen as inevitably bound up with Country Music. While this is not counter-country, it fits much more into folk - as the names Dylan and Baez rightly connote.



    One Too Many Mornings is too often overlooked among Dylan's compositions, and this is among the best renditions I've heard. The full-length, unhurried treatment Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowland is spell-binding and satisfying. Perhaps my favorite, though, is the subtle and poignant Spanish Boots of Spanish Leather. Dylan's lyrical genius is fully manifest, in his gorgeous melody and Joan Baez's a wonderful performance.
    For many of us who listened both then and recently, this pristine work inevitably reminds us how much has aged in the decades since this earlier era - also recaptured so vividly in Dylan's own Chronicles. These are timely works, both for reminiscence and to introduce newbies to the non-acid experiences that stirred an earlier generation. But regardless of any social import, this is simply beautiful poetry and music.



    Musicians:



    • Joan Baez (guitar, vocal)

    • Fred Carter (mandolin)

    • Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (keyboards)

    • Stephen Stills, Pete Drake, Harold Rugg (guitar)

    • Tommy Jackson, Johnny Gimble (violin)




    Recording: 1968 by Selby Cofeen

    Production: Maynard Solomon



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Love Minus Zero/No Limit
    2. North Country Blues
    3. You Ain't Going Nowhere
    4. Drifter's Escape
    5. I Pity the Poor Immigrant

    6. Tears of Rage
    7. Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands
    8. Love Is Just a Four-Letter Word
    9. I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine

    10. The Walls of Redwing
    11. Dear Landlord
    12. One Too Many Mornings
    13. I Shall Be Released
    14. Boots of Spanish Leather
    15. Walkin' Down the Line

    16. Restless Farewell
    Joan Baez
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Manhattan Symphonie (Pure Pleasure) Manhattan Symphonie (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Manhattan Symphonie (Pure Pleasure)

    During the autumn of his illustrious career, Dexter Gordon (1923-1990) was on a winning streak. In 1976, the sophisticated giant of the tenor saxophone had returned to America after 14 successful years in Europe (with occasional visits to his native country); when he played a homecoming engagement at New York's fabled Village Vanguard, the seats were filled each night with adoring fans and enraptured critics. Two years later, Gordon recorded Manhattan Symphonie, his third album for Columbia and the first with his exceptional working rhythm section of pianist George Cables, bassist Rufus Reid, and drummer Eddie Gladden.



    From the opening notes of the classic ballad As Time Goes By, we are fully aware that we're in the presence of a master. The tone is luminous; the placement of the notes, impeccable; the feeling profoundly affecting. More than almost any other improviser of his caliber, Gordon understands exactly why »the fundamental things apply«. The rest of the set combines bright new material, such as Gordon's jauntily bopping blues LTD (which stands for Long Tall Dexter) and Cables' samba I Told You So with updates of two post-bop staples: Donald Byrd's Tanya (which Gordon had recorded for Blue Note in 1964) and John Coltrane's propulsive Moment's Notice. But the masterpiece herein - indeed one of Gordon's all-time surpassing performances - is Body and Soul, in which Gordon, an early crucial influence on Coltrane's approach to the tenor, returns the favour by taking a page out of Coltrane's (and McCoy Tyner's) harmonic book.



    This expanded issue of Manhattan Symphonie includes two bonus tracks, also from 1978: Thelonius Monk's lustrous "Ruby My Dear", and a previously unreleased on vinyl rendition of "Secret Love", a Dexter favourite. In addition to the acclaimed writer Pete Hamill's wonderful original liner notes, there is a lovely reminiscence from pianist George Cables.



    Musicians:



    • Dexter Gordon (tenor saxophone)

    • George Cables (piano)

    • Rufus Reid (bass)

    • Eddie Gladden (drums)



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    As Time Goes By/ Moments Notice
    Tanya/ Body and Soul
    I Told You So / Ltd
    Ruby, My Dear/ Secret Love*
    Dexter Gordon
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Newport Jazz Festival: Live At Carnegie Hall (Pure Pleasure) Newport Jazz Festival: Live At Carnegie Hall (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
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    Newport Jazz Festival: Live At Carnegie Hall (Pure Pleasure)

    This is a wonderful live album. Recorded toward the end of Ella's career, by concert's end it is apparent that she has about lost her voice, but not the audience's adoration. The album showcases her in various settings: with the (obviously) reconstituted Chick Webb Orchestra, with Ellis Larkins, with Joe Pass and with Tommy Flanagan (of course); the album also has some nods to the Webb Orchestra, noteworthy for late-career blowing by 'Lockjaw' Davis. Highlights: Nice Work If You Can Get It, Good Morning Heartache (an intended and most worthy tribute to Lady Day), Miss Otis Regrets, the first encore of Some of these Days, and intended set-ender of Ella doing what she does best, scatting through Lemon Drop.



    Musicians:



    • Ella Fitzgerald (vocal)

    • Chick Webb Orchestra




    Recording: July 1973 at Carnegie Hall, New York



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. I've Gotta Be Me
    2. Good Morning Heartache
    3. Miss Otis Regrets
    4. Medley: Don't Worry 'Bout Me/These Foolish Things
    5. Any Old Blues
    6. A-Tisket A-Tasket
    7. Indian Summer
    8. Smooth Sailing
    9. You Turned The Tables On Me
    10. Nice Work If You Can Get It
    11. I've Got A Crush On You
    12. Medley: I Can't Get Started/The Young Man With The Horn/'Round Midnight
    13. Star Dust
    14. C Jam Blues
    15. Medley: Taking A Chance On Love/I'm In The Mood For Love
    16. Lemon Drop
    17. Some Of These Days
    18. People
    Ella Fitzgerald
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Sugar (Pure Pleasure) Sugar (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Sugar (Pure Pleasure)

    If ever there were a record that both fit perfectly and stood outside the CTI Records' stable sound, it is Sugar by Stanley Turrentine. Turrentine, a veteran of the soul-jazz scene since the '50s, was accompanied by a who's who of groove players, including guitarist George Benson, Lonnie Liston Smith on electric piano, Freddie Hubbard on trumpet, bassist Ron Carter, organist Butch Cornell, and drummer Billy Kaye, among others. The title track is a deep soul blues workout with a swinging backbeat and the rhythm section fluidly streaming through fours and eights as Benson, Hubbard, and Turrentine begin slowly and crank up the heat, making the pace and stride of the cut simmer then pop - especially in Hubbard's solo. This is truly midnight blue, and the party's at the point of getting really serious or about to break up. By the time Benson picks up his break, full of slick, shiny, warm arpeggios, the seams are bursting and couples are edging into corners. Butch Cornell's Sunshine Alley is a solid, funky groover, paced by organ and double fours by Kaye. Turrentine and Hubbard stride into the melody and keep the vamp in the pocket, riding out past the blues line into a tag that just revs the thing up even further. But the big surprise is in the final track, one of the most solidly swinging, from-the-gut emotional rides of John Coltrane's Impressions ever taken. Turrentine is deep inside his horn, ringing out in legato with everything he has - and it is considerable. Ron Carter's bass playing flows through the modal interludes, creating a basis for some beautifully intervallic invention by Benson and Smith by building a series of harmonic bridges through the mode to solos. It's hard to believe this is Turrentine, yet is could be no one else. If jazz fans are interested in Turrentine beyond the Blue Note period - and they should be - this is a heck of a place to listen for satisfaction.



    Musicians:



    • Freddie Hubbard (trumpet)

    • Stanley Turrentine (tenor saxophone)

    • Lonnie Liston Smith (electric piano)

    • Butch Cornell (organ)

    • George Benson (guitar), Ron Carter (bass), Billy Kaye (drums)

    • Richard Pablo Landrum (conga)




    Recording: November 1970 at Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA

    Production: Creed Taylor



    Format: 1LP 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Sugar
    2. Sunshine Alley
    3. Impressions
    4. Sugar (previously unreleased, live, bonus track)
    Stanley Turrentine
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Friends (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale) Friends (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $49.99 $34.99 Save $15.00 (30%)

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    Friends (Pure Pleasure) (On Sale)

    Friends is the accurate and revealing title for New York bluesman Eric Bibb's tenth album since 1997. The cuts here feature rootsy folk and blues collaborations with different 'friends' in differing small group settings. The set starts with a killer acoustic slide duet between Bibb and Guy Davis on the nugget 99 ½ Won't Do. The contrast between Davis' sweet and smoky delivery and Bibb's husky wail - akin to Blind Willie Johnson's in places - offers a double-sided dimension in interpretation for the listener, as well. Elsewhere, Charlie Musselwhite gives a killer snaky harmonica performance on Six O' Clock Blues. Taj Mahal makes two appearances; one in a duet on Goin' Down Slow, and one in a trio with Bibb and Malian guitarist Djelimady Tounkara on a medley of the traditional Kulanjan and Bibb's own Sebastian's Tune. Speaking of Mali, and Mahal, Bibb also covers the elder bluesman's classic Lovin' in My Baby's Eyes, with the great kora player Mamadou Diabate that rivals the original. There's also a gorgeous version of Guy and Susanna Clark's The Cape, with guitarist Martin Simpson, Bibb's moving For You with Ruthie Foster, and Tain't No Such Thing, a bright new folk song written and sung with legendary folksinger Odetta. Mohan Veena ace Harry Manx performs with Bibb on the high lonesome, droning blues of Needed Time, and with Kristina Olsen on her If I Stayed. The set closes with the tender Dance Me to the End of Love, (an original, not the Leonard Cohen tune) with the Lovin' Spoonful Jerry Yester playing piano. Given that most records of this type are mixed bags at best, with 'star-studded' collabs serving to muck up or water down rather than enhance performances, Friends is an anomaly. There is nothing that's obvious or overblown here, everything is subtly shaded, and the performers serve the songs and not themselves. The listener gets no sense of back-patting or self-congratulation, only the great pleasure of hearing this music in a revealing, emotionally honest way. Bravo.



    Musicians:



    • Eric Bibb (arranger, guitar, vocal)

    • Odetta (vocal)

    • Ruthie Foster (vocal)

    • Guy Davis (arranger, harpsichord, vocal, guitar)

    • Taj Mahal (guitar, vocal, banjo)

    • Charlie Musselwhite (harpsichord)

    • Mamadou Diabate (kora)

    • Martin Simpson (guitar)

    • Michael Jerome Browne (fiddle, vocal, guitar, mandolin)





    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. 99 1/2 Won't Do
    2. Six O'Clock Blues
    3. Goin' Down Slow
    4. Lovin' In My Baby's Eyes
    5. For You
    6. The Cape
    7. 'Tain't Such A Much
    8. Needed Time
    9. If I Stayed
    10. Connected
    11. Ribbons And Bows
    12. Just Look Up
    13. Cowgirl Queen
    14. Kulanjan/Sebastian's Tune
    15. Dance Me To The End Of Love
    Eric Bibb
    $49.99 $34.99 Save $15.00 (30%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Desmond Blue (Pure Pleasure) Desmond Blue (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Desmond Blue (Pure Pleasure)

    As intended, this album presents alto sax specialist Paul Desmond as never featured before, with the backing of a string orchestra. The record, filled with such beautiful jazz standards as My Funny Valentine, I've Got You Under My Skin, and Body and Soul, is very rich in texture, yet subtle and mellow overall in mood. It's unyielding purpose: to soothe the souls of its listeners. Desmond's style and tone shine with an alluring quality, and the record is filled with melodies that don't fail to stimulate the sophisticated jazz listener. Desmond's melodies are eloquently detailed and charmingly spun in the midst of the string orchestra arranged and conducted by Bob Prince. The legendary Jim Hall is featured as guest guitarist, playing yet another scintillating role and using his classic comping style. Hall is perhaps the most highly respected of all jazz guitarists for his good taste and witty inventiveness. Desmond has always been most familiar to the jazz public for his sweeping scale passages and his seemingly effortless spontaneity during periods of improvisation, although here he is often featured in a more lyrical ballad style on such romantic tunes as My Funny Valentine, Late Lament, and Then I'll Be Tired of You. This album is a highly innovative and meticulously crafted work, reflecting the ongoing success of both Desmond and Hall within the 1960s and the cool jazz period. Both of these musicians spent time working with Dave Brubeck and later lent themselves to many of Antonio Carlos Jobim's bossa nova projects. The arrangements are extraordinary throughout this collection, including the charming Valentine, which begins with a fantastic Elizabethan flavor. The intro sets up the mood to carry Desmond into the first chorus, which then glides into a 20th century style. The tune I Should Care is »a shimmering debt to Ibert and one of the most imaginative blendings you will ever hear of strings, reeds, French horn and harp,« according to the liner notes. The tone of the album: lush, reflective, thought-provoking, and soul-stirring. This work is quite a plus for any listener and especially those who consider themselves avid fans of Paul Desmond.



    Musicians:



    • Paul Desmond (saxophone)

    • Jim Hall (guitar)

    • Bob Prince (arranger, conductor & strings)



    Recording: 1962 at Webster Hall, New York City, by Ray Hall

    Production: George Aviakan



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. My Funny Valentine
    2. Desmond Blue
    3. Then I'll Be Tired of You
    4. I've Got You Under My Skin
    5. Late Lament
    6. I Should Care
    7. Like Someone In Love
    8. Ill Wind
    9. Body and Soul
    Paul Desmond
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Texas Flood (Pure Pleasure) Texas Flood (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Texas Flood (Pure Pleasure)

    It's hard to overestimate the impact Stevie Ray Vaughan's debut, Texas Flood, had upon its release in 1983. At that point, blues was no longer hip, the way it was in the '60s. Texas Flood changed all that, climbing into the Top 40 and spending over half a year on the charts, which was practically unheard of for a blues recording. Vaughan became a genuine star and, in doing so, sparked a revitalization of the blues. This was a monumental impact, but his critics claimed that, no matter how prodigious Vaughan's instrumental talents were, he didn't forge a distinctive voice; instead, he wore his influences on his sleeve, whether it was Albert King's pinched yet muscular soloing or Larry Davis' emotive singing. There's a certain element of truth in that, but that was sort of the point of Texas Flood. Vaughan didn't hide his influences; he celebrated them, pumping fresh blood into a familiar genre.



    When Vaughan and Double Trouble cut the album over the course of three days in 1982, he had already played his set lists countless times; he knew how to turn this material inside out or goose it up for maximum impact. The album is paced like a club show, kicking off with Vaughan's two best self-penned songs, Love Struck Baby and Pride and Joy, then settling into a pair of covers, the slow-burning title track and an exciting reading of Howlin' Wolf's Tell Me, before building to the climax of Dirty Pool and I'm Crying. Vaughan caps the entire thing with Lenny, a lyrical, jazzy tribute to his wife.




    Musicians:



    • Texas Flood - Stevie Ray Vaughan (g, voc)

    • Tommy Shannon (b)

    • Chris "Whipper" Layton (dr)




    Recording: November 1982 at Down Town Studios, Los Angeles, and Riverside Sound, Austin (Texas) by Richard Mullen / September 1983 at The Palace, Hollywood, California

    Production: Stevie Ray Vaughan, Richard Mullen & Double Troubledeutsch



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Love Struck Baby
    2. Pride And Joy
    3. Texas Flood
    4. Tell Me
    5. Testify
    6. Rude Mood
    7. Mary Had A Little Lamb
    8. Dirty Pool
    9. Im Cryin
    10. Lenny


    Bonus Tracks:
    11. SRV Speaks
    12. Tin Pan Alley (AKA Roughest Place In Town)
    13. Testify (live)
    14. Mary Had A Little Lamb (live)
    15. Wham! (live)

    Stevie Ray Vaughan
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Mahler - Symphony #3 (Speakers Corner) Mahler - Symphony #3 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Mahler - Symphony #3 (Speakers Corner)

    "My symphony will be something the world has never heard before. The whole of Nature will be lent a voice in it and will impart such deep secrets as those one might imagine in one's dreams." Mahler's vision of music which reflects the world finds its monumental culmination in his Third Symphony. The god Pan awakes to dull drum beats and rumbling basses. From afar a lied theme feels its way to the fore. The mild season of Spring dawns with song, sounds of nature and the budding of vegetation; then at last Summer marches in, grotesquely distorted in its exuberance, expressing the dualism of the innocence of Nature and its terrifying primeval force. Only in the finale are these contrarieties united in glorious harmony - although an undercurrent of doubt is always present.



    Sir Georg Solti and the London Symphony Orchestra are absolutely ideal for performing this mammoth, highly complex, multi-layered work. With fairly brisk tempi, clearly differentiated strings, and the usual excellent brass, Solti gives a gripping performance which no Mahler fan should miss - even if already has other recordings of the work in his collection.



    Musicians:



    • The London Symphony Orchestra

    • Sir Georg Solti (conductor)





    Recording: January 1968 at Kingsway Hall, London by Gordon Parry and James Lock

    Production: David Harvey




    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve, booklet



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Gustav Mahler
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Mahler - Symphony #2 (Speakers Corner) (On Sale) Mahler - Symphony #2 (Speakers Corner) (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $69.99 $48.99 Save $21.00 (30%)

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    x

    Mahler - Symphony #2 (Speakers Corner) (On Sale)

    The search for the extra-musical world in Gustav Mahler's philosophical and programmatic works will doubtless continue to occupy future generations of music scholars. Today's music lovers, however, are wholly satisfied with the highly varied interpretations and impressive sound reproduction - which is precisely what Mahler himself wished for his rugged works. For decades Mahler's dramatic musical masterpieces were misunderstood and scorned as "kapellmeister music". Luckily interest in his works was revived and all nine symphonies were recorded in the 1960s by the recently deceased conductor Sir Georg Solti. Right up to this very day, his cycle has clearly lost nothing of its aura, its reputation for "never having been surpassed" - how could it otherwise have been so successful for so many years in the light of all the highly competitive, more recent recordings?



    After the success of the new pressing of Mahler's First Symphony (DECCA SXL 6113), it was high time that the Resurrection-Symphony became available on LP once more. And the result is most impressive. One can only hope that the complete Mahler cycle will one day be resurrected in vinyl.



    Musicians:



    • Heather Harper

    • Helen Watts

    • London Symphony Orchestra and Chorus

    • Sir Georg Solti (conductor)





    Recording : May 1966 at Kingsway Hall, London by Gordon Parry

    Production: David Harvey



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve, booklet



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Gustav Mahler
    $69.99 $48.99 Save $21.00 (30%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
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