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  • The Distance To Here The Distance To Here Quick View

    $39.99
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    The Distance To Here


    Limited First Pressing Of 2.000 Numbered Copies On 180 Gram Orange Vinyl, Black Vinyl Thereafter


    Includes 4 Page Insert With Song Lyrics And Credits


    Special Embossed Sleeve


    Featuring The Hit Single The Dolphin's Cry, Run To The Water And They Stood Up For Love


    The Distance to Here is the fourth studio album by the band Live, where the band called on producer Jerry Harrison to recapture their unique raw energy and emotion. It debuted at #4 on the Billboard 200, selling 138,000 copies in its first week and was certified Platinum by the RIAA in the same year.


    The Distance to Here is filled with plenty of guitar riffs, thunderous tempos and a mystical aura andregains the aggressive intensity of Throwing Copper [MOVLP414] from 1994. The album derived three hit singles including The Dolphin's Cry, Run To The Water and They Stood Up For Love.


    During the Worldwide Reunion Tour 2017 by LIVE, two of their in-demand albums will finally be made available on vinyl again. The 1997 double album Secret Samadhi and the 1999 album The Distance To Here will follow-up the Throwing Copper release pressed in 2012 by Music On Vinyl.


    Since the reunion is a special moment for the band and fans, Music On Vinyl believes there is no better way than celebrating the tour by repressing the two albums and making these epic releases for fans and listeners finally available on vinyl again.

    1. The Dolphin's Cry
    2. The Distance
    3. Sparkle
    4. Run To The Water
    5. Sun
    6. Voodoo Lady
    7. Where Fishes Go
    8. Face And Ghost (The Children's Song)
    9. Feel The Quiet River Rage
    10. Meltdown
    11. They Stood Up For Love
    12. We Walk In The Dream
    13. Dance With You
    Live
    $39.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Secret Samadhi Secret Samadhi Quick View

    $42.99
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    Secret Samadhi


    Limited First Pressing Of 2,000 Numbered Copies On 180 Gram Silver Vinyl, Black Vinyl Thereafter


    Includes Poster With Song Lyrics And Credits


    Special Drip-off Colour Sleeve


    20th Year Anniversary Edition


    Featuring The Hit Songs Lakini's Juice, Rattlesnake, Turn My Head And Freaks


    Live spikes their third album Secret Samadhi with Eastern-tinged strings, sitars, and powerful guitars. It took its name from Samadhi, a state of Hindu meditation. The album is co-produced by the band and Jay Healy and debuted in 1997 at number one on the charts.


    Secret Samadhi contains four modern rock hit singles including Lakini's Juice, Rattlesnake, Turn My Head and Freaks. The first hit Lakini's Juice opens with some abrasive staccato guitar and features an orchestra towards the end.


    During the Worldwide Reunion Tour 2017 by Live, two of their in-demand albums will finally be made available on vinyl again. The 1997 double album Secret Samadhi and the 1999 album The Distance To Here [MOVLP1886] will follow-up the Throwing Copper [MOVLP414] release pressed in 2012 by Music On Vinyl.


    Since the reunion is a special moment for the band and fans, Music On Vinyl believes there is no better way than celebrating the tour by repressing the two albums and making these epic releases for fans and listeners finally available on vinyl again.

    LP 1
    1. Rattlesnake
    2. Lakini's Juice
    3. Graze
    4. Century
    5. Ghost
    6. Unsheathed


    LP 2
    1. Insomnia And The Hole In The Universe
    2. Turn My Head
    3. Heropsychodreamer
    4. Freaks
    5. Merica
    6. Gas Hed Goes West

    Live
    $42.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Live With Intronaut Live With Intronaut Quick View

    $22.99
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    Live With Intronaut

    For years this was asked on various message boards across the internet. This author posed the same question after a friend from Columbus sent a link saying "this is from a guy around here who gives away his music for free". This was before that was a cool thing to do. This was before Bandcamp. This was before "pay what you like" was a phrase.


    Every now and then a new record or EP would appear online. There was no label 'hype machine', no build up, no marketing, just great music and word of mouth. The mystery grew and eventually Cloudkicker was tracked down.


    Cloudkicker is Ben Sharp, a one-man project hailing from Columbus, Ohio. He gave short interviews here and there, pieces were put together; he had a day job, music was for fun, he does everything on his own and he'd never tour or never work with a label.


    Credit Los Angeles post-prog metallers, Intronaut for helping break one of his statutes. In early 2014 it was announced that Cloudkicker would tour North America with none other than Intronaut as his backing band.


    It was either Sacha (Dunable, Intronaut vocalist/guitarist) or Dave (Timnick, Intronaut guitarist) or both who floated the idea of using Intronaut as Cloudkicker's band. I thought it was a nice gesture but didn't really take it seriously since I figured there wouldn't be any way to make a live show happen given the distance between us and my work schedule that has me traveling 3-4 days a week. Fast forward to this past fall when they came through Columbus again and we spent the evening discussing what the realities of a tour like that would be. It was definitely a fun topic to discuss, but moreover I was impressed by their genuine excitement to maybe, one day, have the opportunity to do this. And the fact that they are musicians of such caliber and professionalism made it obvious that there would be no problems handling the music and translating it to a live show with minimal time in the same room rehearsing it, so long as I provided them with appropriate materials with which to prepare.


    That he did and at the tail end of March, 2014, Sharp played his first show as Cloudkicker with Intronaut as his backing band in his hometown. A month of shows followed and luckily enough, the guys found time to enter a studio in Texas and record the set live.


    With Intronaut being tied to Century Media Records, another one of Cloudkicker's statutes was broken. Cloudkicker's Live With Intronaut will be released on 11/25 through Century Media, marking the first time ever prog's most enigmatic artists will find his records available to retailers and in stores. An historic event on all levels.

    1. Subsume Part 1
    2. Subsume Part 2
    3. We Are Going To Invert.../Here, Wait A Minute, Damn It!
    4. We're Goin' In, We're Going Down
    5. Seriosity
    6. You And Yours
    7. Dysphoria
    8. Subsume Part 8
    9. Push It Way Up!
    Cloudkicker
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Hard Believer Hard Believer Quick View

    $29.99
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    Hard Believer

    Hard Believer is the eagerly-awaited new studio album from Fink: Fin Greenall (vocals/guitar), together with Tim Thornton (drums/guitar) and Guy Whittaker (bass). It will be their first release on the R'COUP'D imprint, a label newly created by Greenall with the backing of the Ninja Tune team.


    Recorded in seventeen days at Hollywood's legendary Sound Factory studios with producer Billy Bush (Garbage, Beck, Foster the People), Hard Believer is shot through with rawness and controlled aggression; an album replete with calm beginnings seguing into powerfully hypnotic loops and climactic finales. It is a masterful collection of songs from an artist at the peak of his creative powers.


    "We wanted to go deeper this time, and be more ambitious with the music," Fin explains, "to move the sound forward without losing touch of where we're from."


    Urban, bluesy, and alive, the album presents ten brand new songs, including the mighty "Shakespeare", a tale of young love gone tragically sour as the mood darkens from acoustic to guttural rock; the spiky yet delicate "Looking Too Closely", riding an irresistible piano-and-guitar groove; "Green and the Blue", on which a vulnerable Greenall meditates on the constants in life that see you through tough times; "Two Days Later", a deeply personal lament and one of only two songs on the record that start and remain down-tempo; and the breathtaking "Pilgrim", the latest collaboration with songwriter Blair Mackichan, co-writer of "This Is The Thing" from Fink's 2007 album Distance and Time, and "Honesty" from 2011's Perfect Darkness.


    Since making the transition from world-class club DJ and electronic producer, to the first ever singer-songwriter signed to legendary British label Ninja Tune, Greenall has released four critically acclaimed albums, worked in the studio with the likes of John Legend, Ximena SariƱana, Amy Winehouse and Professor Green and enjoyed incredible live success with the hugely popular 18-month Perfect Darkness world tour, which accumulated two live records: 2012's Wheels Turn Beneath My Feet, and 2013's Fink Meets the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra. All this and Fink is still a name which - while evoking an impassioned response from many a fellow artist and from the avid fanbase - remains a mystery to a wider majority. This looks set to change...


    The term Hard Believer comes from deep-south Americana; it means somebody who is difficult to persuade, who requires proof. In truth, all anyone has to do here is listen to the powerful collection of songs on Hard Believer. The belief will surely follow.

    1. Hard Believer
    2. Green and the Blue
    3. White Flag
    4. Pilgrim
    5. Two Days Later
    6. Shakespeare
    7. Truth Begins
    8. Looking Too Closely
    9. Too Late
    10. Keep Falling
    Fink
    $29.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • J Roddy Walston & The Business J Roddy Walston & The Business Quick View

    $19.99
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    J Roddy Walston & The Business

    Not too many bands would move to Baltimore, MD in search of their big break -- as the city's most famous citizen, John Waters, once put it, No one moves here -- and fewer still would consider making the jump to Charm City from Chattanooga, TN. But J. Roddy Walston and the Business are clearly not your average rock & roll band, and after listening to their self-titled second album (and first for Vagrant Records), this trajectory actually makes some sense. The band's music suggests a meeting of the minds between the Deep South and the East Coast -- Walston's raw, twangy vocals and rollicking piano style and Billy C. Gordon's thick guitar lines cut with sharp interjections of slide, could both come straight from a Tennessee roadhouse, but the heavy stomp of Logan Davis' bass and Steve Colmus' drums is all-beef, no-filler hard rock stomp, the stuff of guys who've spent half their life trying to perfect Led Zeppelin's glorious thud and are within spitting distance of catching it. Put these two sides together, have them spend a few hundred nights playing bars where they struggle to be heard over flying beer bottles and shouts for more bourbon, and you could get something a lot like J. Roddy Walston and the Business.


    These ten songs have swagger to spare, but there's little in the way of crowd-pleasing gestures; this band is here to rock but you have to take or leave them on their own terms, and the material is strong enough that plenty of listeners are likely to climb aboard for the ride. Whether they're living on the edge in Brave Man's Death, sharing tales of unsatisfying lovers in Pigs and Pearls, or mixing risky metaphors in Don't Break the Needle, J. Roddy Walston and the Business are a real-deal, roots-conscious hard rock band in an era when such things are believed to have gone the way of the 8-track tape. Picture a band that captures the lean and glorious Southern arrogance of the early Black Crowes and the FTW attitude of Appetite for Destruction-era Guns N' Roses -- all without obviously lifting licks from either act -- and you get one enjoyably butt-kicking surprise of an album.


    - Mark Deming (All Music Guide)

    1. Don't Break The Needle
    2. Full Growing Man
    3. Used To Did
    4. Pies N' Pearls
    5. Brave Man's Death
    6. Don't Get Old
    7. I Don't Wanna Hear It
    8. Uh Oh Rock N' Roll
    9. Caroline
    10. Use Your Language
    J Roddy Walston And The Business
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Forever Forever Quick View

    $16.99
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    Forever

    For their debut full-length Forever, this San Francisco duo pairs classic pop structures with modern electronic production to create instantly memorable melodies that show no sign of their virtual patchwork beginnings.


    Whether living four states away or four blocks away, Reese Donohue and Christopher Prudhomme have always used the Internet -- at first out of necessity, later out of preference -- to collaborate on their songwriting.


    Although the cousins grew up together in Lafayette, Louisiana, Donohue eventually moved to San Francisco, while Prudhomme stayed near New Orleans.


    The newfound distance between them forced the pair to start sending song ideas back and forth via e-mail, a virtual exchange that quickly spawned Painted Palms' first release, Canopy, which was discovered by of Montreal's Kevin Barnes


    Tours with of Montreal, Braids and STRFKR soon followed before Prudhomme moved out west to San Francisco, where Donohue still lived.


    Yet, despite being in the same place for the first time in years, the duo continued writing songs apart from one another -- completing individual ideas in isolation and piecing them together through the computer.


    And so, the songs that would eventually form their debut full-length Forever, came together as if the musicians were still separated by 2000 miles: Donohue sending a short, looping beat and Prudhomme replying with a vocal melody before continuing to bounce the track back and forth between them until it was complete, this time focusing on creating songs with classic pop structures.


    As if crafted by tailors so skilled you can never find the seams, the songs on Forever provide no hint of their patchwork beginnings. Instead, the album is permeated with blissfully buoyant tracks like Here It Comes and Forever, which glide smoothly on a foundation of instantly memorable melodies.


    Elsewhere, touches of Painted Palms' most prominent influences -- '60s psych pop paired with modern electronic production -- are clearly evident, as on the dark and driving hooks that propel lead single Spinning Signs.


    Don't be fooled, though. Underneath the sunny sonic exterior, the lyrics on Forever exist in a different place, with much of the focus centered on how it feels to be caught between the external world and one's own thoughts.


    Thinking about myself too much I can see that / I don't know what to be, sings Prudhomme on Forever's title cut.


    And in that moment a hint of irony is apparent, for as much as the members of Painted Palms want to get out of their own heads, they're awfully good at writing songs that will immediately get stuck in yours.

    1. Too High
    2. Here It Comes
    3. Hypnotic
    4. Forever
    5. Soft Hammer
    6. Carousel
    7. Not Really There
    8. Hope That You See It Now
    9. Spinning Signs
    10. Sleepwalking
    11. Empty Gun
    12. Angels
    Painted Palms
    $16.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • It's Alive It's Alive Quick View

    $13.99
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    It's Alive

    Seattle's La Luz recorded their debut EP, Damp Face, in a small trailer on a hot August day. But barring the inevitable "no-AC-in-the-van" summer tour calamity, La Luz runs cool. Their brand of coolness isn't about distance or affect; it's a mood, and-sue me, but I'm about to totally rip off Zelda Fitzgerald: Something about this music vibrates to the dusky, dreamy smell of dying moons and shadows. So yeah, that kind of cool.


    Still, La Luz's live shows, more than most these days, are about connection. It's evident that the four ridiculously talented ladies on stage are not only playing music with each other, but for each other. And they engage their audience as well. Like a proper punk band-which they are not- they give you shit for not dancing. They convey a gritty self-possession, a sense that they've been there and back again. And, like the expert, but seemingly effortless, surf licks and meandering bass lines that rise and fall throughout their songs, their mocking is playful and dreamy and disarming enough to get most of the crowd (and sometimes the keyboard player) dancing down the center line of a soul train.


    But as any half-assed Freudian will tell you, there can be no meaningful connection without first weathering some dark and lonely times. Here comes the chilly part: What makes La Luz stand out-and stand out fast-the band has only been playing together for a year and people took notice almost immediately-is that this is a band that embodies that most elusive slant on the human condition: longing, and the fleeting relief that tags alongside deep desire.


    In Spanish, La Luz means "light" and that's the perfect thing to evoke when your songs give the illusion of veering in the opposite direction. But lift out most any lyric-which is a good excuse to give a closer listen to the delicate, four-part harmonies that are fast becoming the band's signature-and you'll find that the aches and pains of love and loss, of living in a world where no foothold is ever a promise-all this is delivered with a nuanced dose of perfectly timed exhilaration, like the whole thing might just be worth it in the end.


    Last spring, La Luz returned to that steamy trailer park to record It's Alive - the much-anticipated follow up to Damp Face - with their friend and engineer Johnny Goss. From the first get-psyched drum roll and eerie chords of "Sure As Spring", the dinged-up pop gem that opens the album, the rest moves like a slow drive on a dangerous road, slinking and bending as the terrain shifts. On "What Good Am I?", the lead vocals, and the swirl of harmonies that surround it, recall the Spartan haze of Mazzy Star's misty-eyed super hit. Smack in the middle is the title track. "It's Alive" is a jangly rocker with a spooky refrain, oodles of ooohs, and a marauding narrative that nails down the misty logic of the rest of the album. Two instrumentals, "Sunstroke" and "Phantom Feelings", showcase the band's beach jam surf chops, and fall perfectly between the chilled out heartache that surrounds them.


    Imagine all of the Shangri-La's trying, precariously, to balance on top of Link Wray's surfboard.

    -- Pitchfork


    The kind of sweet surf rock with a touch of melancholy that should be the soundtrack to the slow-dancing-at-prom scene in every teen movie.

    -- The Stranger

    1. Sure As Spring
    2. All the Time
    3. Morning High
    4. What Good Am I?
    5. Sunstroke
    6. It's Alive
    7. Big Big Blood
    8. Call Me in the Day
    9. Pink Slime
    10. Phantom Feelings
    11. You Can Never Know
    La Luz
    $13.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Loyalty Loyalty Quick View

    $21.99
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    Loyalty

    The record was called Loyalty from the beginning-it was the first decision I made about it. It's a word you
    usually see written in copperplate script, a virtue: LOYALTY. But the songs don't treat it that way, just as a
    thing to unpack. It's a force that you have to reckon with: loyalty to the dream, to the "work," to the mythical idea of "you" that somebody thought they saw. It can be a weakness as much as a strength; it can keep you from the reality of your own life, your own self. - Tamara Lindeman


    In excess virtue lies danger, or at least limits to pragmatic action-it's a lesson hard learned by anyone
    disillusioned by the erosion of youthful mythologies. Strict fealty to a fixed ideal of identity doesn't do us
    any favors as adults. Loyalty, the third and finest album yet by The Weather Station (and the first for
    Paradise of Bachelors) wrestles with these knotty notions of faithfulness/faithlessness-to our idealism,
    our constructs of character, our memories, and to our family, friends, and lovers-representing a bold
    step forward into new sonic and psychological inscapes. It's a natural progression for Toronto artist
    Tamara Lindeman's acclaimed songwriting practice. Recorded at La Frette Studios just outside Paris in
    the winter of 2014, in close collaboration with Afie Jurvanen (Bahamas) and Robbie Lackritz (Feist),
    the record crystallizes her lapidary songcraft into eleven emotionally charged vignettes and intimate
    portraits, redolent of fellow Canadians Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen, and David Wiffen, but utterly her
    own.


    Lindeman describes La Frette, housed in an enormous, crumbling 19th-century mansion, as
    "a secret garden, a place of enchantment and grace": walls mantled in ivy and lions, corridors piled high
    with discarded tape machines, old reels, and priceless guitars. As she puts it, "Recording where we did
    meant we embraced beauty-we weren't afraid of it being beautiful." Like the record itself, it's a quietly
    radical statement, especially since certain passages achieve a diaphanous eeriness and harmonic and
    rhythmic tension new to The Weather Station. The stacked vocal harmonies of "Tapes," the drifting,
    jazz-inflected chording in "Life's Work," and the glacial percussion in "Personal Eclipse" contribute to a
    pervading sense of clock-stopping bloom and smolder, recalling the spooky avant-soul of Terry Callier's
    Occasional Rain.


    Beyond the decaying decadence and vintage gear, the brokedown palace atmosphere of
    La Frette afforded a more significant interior luxury as well, one stated with brutal honesty in the
    stunning "Shy Women": "it seemed to me that luxury would be to be not so ashamed, not to look away."


    Accordingly, Loyalty brings a freshly unflinching self-examining gaze and emotional and musical control
    to The Weather Station's songs. She is an extraordinary singer and instrumentalist-on Loyalty she plays
    guitar, banjo, keys, and vibes-but Lindeman has always been a songwriter's songwriter, recognized for
    her intricate, carefully worded verse, filled with double meanings, ambiguities, and complex metaphors.
    Though more moving than ever, her writing here is almost clinical in its discipline, its deliberate wording
    and exacting delivery, evoking similarly idiosyncratic songsters from Linda Perhacs to Bill Callahan.


    Outside her musical practice, Lindeman also happens to be an accomplished film and
    television actor, and it's her directorial eye for quietly compelling characters and the rich details of the
    everyday, Bressonian in its specificity and scope, that drives the limpid singularity of The Weather
    Station's songs. As in Bresson's films, there is no trace of theater here, no brittle singer-songwriter
    histrionics, but rather a powerful performative focus and narrative restraint, a commitment to what the
    auteur called the "simultaneous precision and imprecision of music." Despite the descriptive delicacy, the
    album never lapses into preciousness or sentimentality, instead retaining its barbs and bristles and
    remaining resolutely clear-eyed and thick-skinned. Lyrically, Loyalty inverts and involutes the language
    of confession, of regret, of our most private and muddled mental feelings, by externalizing those
    anxieties through exquisite observation of the things and people we accumulate, the modest meanings
    accreted during even our most ostensibly mundane domestic moments. ("Your trouble is like a lens," she
    discerns in "I Mined," "through which the whole world bends.")


    "Tapes" and "I Could Only Stand By" expose and exalt the quotidian-"the little tapes"
    hidden beneath a lover's bed, "the sunken old moorings" at the "bruise-colored lake"-without romanticizing
    these scenes of, respectively, grief and guilt. "Like Sisters" analyzes the darker contours of a
    friendship with devastating scrutiny. The breathless momentum of "Way It Is, Way It Could Be"-"both
    are," she sings of the way we sometimes live, for better or for worse, amid multiple truths-hinges on a
    mysterious moment when two brown dogs die underwheel, then don't, and that gut-sickness is
    overturned, a sin redeemed with a second glance. "Floodplain" and "Personal Eclipse" are also road songs
    about traveling through, and owning, the empty places in-between, literally and figuratively-what
    Lindeman deems "the various ways people try to disappear from themselves, in physical distance, in
    politeness."


    To invoke Melville (author of PoB's namesake story), "extreme loyalty to the piety of love"
    can be a destabilizing force, a kind of bondage from which we must emancipate ourselves. The line is
    from his strange masterpiece Pierre, or the Ambiguities; The Weather Station's Loyalty could quite easily
    support the same subtitle for the fascinating ways it navigates the deep canyons between certainty and
    uncertainty, faith and doubt.

    1. Way It Is, Way It Could Be
    2. Loyalty
    3. Floodplain
    4. Shy Women
    5. Personal Eclipse
    6. Life's Work
    7. Like Sisters
    8. I Mined
    9. Tapes
    10. I Could Only Stand By
    11. At Full Height
    The Weather Station
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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