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John Coltrane And Johnny Hartman

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  • John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman Quick View

    $24.99
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    John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman

    1. They Say It's Wonderful
    2. Dedicated To You
    3. My One And Only Love
    4. Lush Life
    5. You Are Too Beautiful
    6. Autumn Serenade
    John Coltrane
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP -Sealed Buy Now
  • I Just Dropped By To Say Hello I Just Dropped By To Say Hello Quick View

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    I Just Dropped By To Say Hello

    The second Impulse session for ballad singer Johnny Hartman followed his classic collaboration with John Coltrane. Hartman is heard in peak form throughout these 11 pieces, which include In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning, Sleepin' Bee, Stairway to the Stars, & even Charade. Tenor saxophonist Illinois Jacquet is on five of the songs, guitarists Kenny Burrell & Jim Hall help out on a few tunes, & Hartman is accompanied by pianist Hank Jones, bassist Milt Hinton, & drummer Elvin Jones.
    1. Charade
    2. In The Wee Small Hours Of The Morning
    3. Sleepin' Bee
    4. Don't You Know I Care
    5. Kiss Run
    6. If I'm Lucky
    7. I Just Dropped By To Say Hello
    8. Stairway To The Stars
    9. Our Time
    10. Don't Call It Love
    11. How Sweet It Is To Be In Love
    Johnny Hartman
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Ellington & Coltrane Ellington & Coltrane Quick View

    $27.99
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    Ellington & Coltrane

    180 Gram Vinyl


    Includes Bonus Track


    Duke Ellington & John Coltrane is a jazz album by Duke Ellington and John Coltrane recorded on September 26, 1962 and released in February 1963 on Impulse! Records.


    For Ellington, it was one of many collaborations with fellow jazz-greats in the early 1960s, including Count Basie, Louis Armstrong, Coleman Hawkins, Max Roach and Charles Mingus. More unusually, it placed him in a jazz quartet setting (in this case, saxophone, piano, bass and drums), rather than his usual one in a big band.


    For Coltrane, it was an opportunity to work with one of jazz's all-time greats. It was one of several albums he recorded in the early 1960s in a more conservative and accessible style, alongside John Coltrane and Johnny Hartman and Ballads. Despite their differences in background, style and age (Ellington was 63 and Coltrane 36 when the tracks were recorded), it has been said that the two interacted seamlessly and subtly, neither one outshining the other.


    The quartet was filled out by the bassist and drummer from either of their bands. The tracks they recorded featured Ellington standards (In a Sentimental Mood), new Ellington compositions and a new Coltrane composition (Big Nick).


    Coltrane felt very honoured to work with Ellington: I was really honoured to have the opportunity of working with Duke. It was a wonderful experience. He has set standards I haven't caught up with yet. I would have liked to have worked over all those numbers again, but then I guess the performances wouldn't have had the same spontaneity. And they mightn't have been any better!

    1. In A Sentimental Mood
    2. Take The Coltrane
    3. Big Nick
    4. Stevie
    5. My Little Brown Book
    6. Angelica
    7. The Feeling Of Jazz
    8. I Got It Bad and That Ain't Good*


    *Bonus Track

    Duke Ellington & John Coltrane
    $27.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Ballads Ballads Quick View

    $27.99
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    Ballads

    Throughout John Coltrane's discography there are a handful of decisive and controversial albums that split his listening camp into factions. Generally, these occur in his later-period works such as Om and Ascension, which push into some pretty heady blowing. As a contrast, Ballads is often criticized as too easy and as too much of a compromise between Coltrane and Impulse! (the two had just entered into the first year of label representation). Seen as an answer to critics who found his work complicated with too many notes and too thin a concept, Ballads has even been accused of being a record that Coltrane didn't want to make. These conspiracy theories (and there are more) really just get in the way of enjoying a perfectly fine album of Coltrane doing what he always did -- exploring new avenues and modes in an inexhaustible search for personal and artistic enlightenment. With Ballads he looks into the warmer side of things, a path he would take with both Johnny Hartman (on John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman) and with Duke Ellington (on Duke Ellington and John Coltrane). Here he lays out for McCoy Tyner mostly, and the results positively shimmer at times. He's not aggressive, and he's not outwardly. Instead he's introspective and at times even predictable, but that is precisely Ballads' draw.

    -All Music Guide
    1. Say It (Over And Over Again)
    2. You Don't Know What Love Is
    3. Too Young To Go Steady
    4. All or Nothing At All
    5. I Wish I Knew
    6. What's New
    7. It's Easy To Remember
    8. Nancy (With THe Laughing Face)
    9. Greensleeves*


    *Bonus Track

    John Coltrane
    $27.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Opium Opium Quick View

    $15.99
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    Opium

    It was in 1996 that Jay-Jay Johanson, a young man from a cold climate, fascinated by the Bristol sound they called trip-hop and Portishead in particular, first tapped delicately on our eardrums. In only a few songs he revealed a family tree that spread its roots far and wide: on one branch Chet Baker and Lee Hazelwood, on the other John Coltrane with Johnny Hartman, and in between a whole army of jazz or symphonic recordings sampled from everywhere imaginable. Almost 20 years later he has returned with an incredible new album called Opium. It contains the very essence of Johanson's music: an ease with inventing melodies, a voice that gently caresses, and the jacked up, heady rhythms that lift and carry the songs. From the peaceful harmonica opening of Drowsy / Too Young To Say Good Night to the smoke-wreathed love song I Don't Know Much About Loving, via titles with a sporadic and light groove (NDE, Alone Too Long), Opium is a courageous offering. Johanson opens his heart with fearlessness and modesty, gracefully lowering his guard and evoking the questions that torment men of his age: love, solitude, fatherhood, immaturity. The songwriting is unerving, the words have a suppressed poetry. This new Jay-Jay Johanson is the work of a guy who has survived the avalanches, who is no longer looking for answers and is content to sketch out the perspectives in as many songs. Some titles are serious (Harakiri), but others immediately take up the reins casting a more gentle, peaceful light, like Scarecrow, a collaboration with Robin Guthrie that would not have sounded out of place on a Cocteau Twins album, or of the strange positivity of Be Yourself or I Love Him So. The strength of Opium is that it asks questions that don't necessarily have an answer; it offers a collection of songs freed from any certitude but which convince through their modesty, through their precision. In short, Jay-Jay Johanson at his best.
    1. Drowsy / Too Young To Say Good Night
    2. Moonshine
    3. Be Yourself
    4. I Love Him So
    5. NDE
    6. I Don't Know Much About Loving
    7. Scarecrow
    8. I Can Count On You
    9. Alone Too Long
    10. Celebrate The Wonders
    Jay-Jay Johanson
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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