Vinyl. Our way of life since 2004 (877) 929-8729

VPI Dealer Authorized & Certified
Site Search
Menu Free shipping on domestic orders over $49.99! - We ship worldwide!
20% Off Vinyl - LP20
Home > Products for: '

James Carter

'
  • 1
Results per page:
  • Dreamland Dreamland Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Dreamland

    Dreamland (1996) is the first album by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Madeleine Peyroux. This wide-ranging set features Peyroux singing swing standards, originals and tunes that hint at country and folk music. Her supporting cast, which changes on each selection, includes a restrained James Carter on tenor and bass clarinet, Marc Ribot on dobro and guitar, trumpeter Marcus Printup, pianist Cyrus Chestnut, Vernon Reid on guitar and violinist Regina Carter, among others. Highlights include Walkin' After Midnight, I'm Gonna Sit Right Down And Write Myself A Letter, La Vie En Rose and Muddy Water.
    1. Walkin' After Midnight
    2. Hey Sweet Man
    3. I'm Gonna Sit Right Down And Write Myself A Letter 3
    4. (Getting Some) Fun Out Of Life
    5. La Vie En Rose
    6. Always A Use
    7. A Prayer
    8. Muddy Water
    9. Was I?
    10. Dreamland
    11. Reckless Blues
    12. Lovesick Blues
    Madeleine Peyroux
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Fuchsia Swing Song Fuchsia Swing Song Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Fuchsia Swing Song

    During the Blue Note 75th anniversary celebration the label released 100 essential Blue Note LPs and asked New York Times readers what titles they'd like to see make the list. This album is one of five new reissues that were hand-selected by Blue Note President, Don Was, based on New York Times reader recommendations.


    Recorded in 1964 immediately after leaving the Miles Davis Quintet, Sam Rivers' Fuchsia Swing Song is one of the more auspicious debuts the label released in the mid-'60s. Rivers was a seasoned session player (his excellent work on Larry Young's Into Somethin' is a case in point) and a former member of Herb Pomeroy's Big Band before he went out with Davis. By the time of his debut, Rivers had been deep under the influence of Coltrane and Coleman, but wasn't willing to give up the blues just yet. Hence the sound on Fuchsia Swing Song is one of an artist who is at once very self-assured, and in transition.


    Using a rhythm section that included Tony Williams (whose Life Time he had guested on), pianist Jaki Byard, and bassist Ron Carter, Rivers took the hard bop and blues of his roots and poured them through the avant-garde colander. Today, players like Joshua Redman, Branford Marsalis, and James Carter do it all the time, but in 1964 it was unheard of. You either played hard bop or free; Davis' entire modal thing hadn't even completely blasted off yet. The title and opening track is a case in point.


    Rivers opens with an angular figure that is quickly translated by the band into sweeping, bopping blues. Rivers legato is lightning quick and his phrasing touches upon Coleman Hawkins, Sonny Rollins, Coleman, and Coltrane, but his embouchure is all his. He strikes the balance and then takes off on both sides of the aisle. Byard's comping is actually far more than that, building in rhythmic figures in striated minors just behind the tenor. Downstairs Blues Upstairs sounds, initially anyway, like it might have come out of the Davis book so deep is its blue root. But courtesy of Byard and Williams, Rivers goes to the left after only four choruses, moving onto the ledge a bit at a time, running knotty arpeggios through the center of the melody and increasingly bending his notes into succeeding intervals while shifting keys and times signatures


    He never goes completely over the edge as he would on his later Blue Note dates. The most difficult cut on the date is Luminous Monolith, with its swing-like figure introducing the melody. Eight bars in, the syncopation of the rhythm sections begins a stutter stem around the time and then the harmony with Byard building dense chords for Rivers to jump off of. On the Connoisseur Series CD (shame on Blue Note once again for making some of its best outside records limited editions; titles like this should be as readily available as Horace Silver's Song for My Father, but the label had been playing it ever so safe for a while and making fans buy the limited number of titles over and again) there are alternate takes of Luminous Monolith and three more of Downstairs Blues Upstairs, making it a very worthwhile look at the entire session.


    This is a highly recommended date. Rivers never played quite like this again.


    - Thom Jurek

    1. Fuchsia Swing Song

    2. Downstairs Blues Upstairs

    3. Cyclic Episode
    4. Luminous Monolith

    5. Beatrice
    6. Ellipsis
    Sam Rivers
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Press On Press On Quick View

    $15.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Press On

    June Carter Cash has lived a charmed life: as a child member of her name-sake kin, The Carter Family, late-night duets with Elvis Presley, a movie appearance with Robert Duvall, romance with James Dean, and a Grammy Award-winning performing and songwriting career with her husband Johnny Cash.



    But, to hear her sing such moving hymns as Diamonds in the Rough is to enjoy the holy, country hospitality of a simple countrywoman of a pure and spiritual heart. On Press On are other such gems as a touching, acoustic version of Ring of Fire, which June co-wrote. Throughout this album, June plays the Autoharp, a type of strummed dulcimer that lends a light, bouncy feel to these pieces that often contain no traditional rhythm section. She displays a worldly sensibility on such folk-rock numbers as the bitter Losin You and humor mixed with wisdom in Tiffany Anastasia Lowe,a song for her granddaughter, the child of daughter Carlene Carter and husband Nick Lowe. June concludes this warm and personal release as she began it, with a moving spiritual rendition of her familys standard, Will the Circle Be Unbroken.



    Press On was originally released in 1999 on the tiny Risk Records label. The album immediately garnered tremendous press accolades, culminating with a Grammy award that year. Risk Records went under shortly after release and Press On has been out of print ever since. Dualtone is proud to make this album available on vinyl for the very first time. Press On features guest performances from Johnny Cash, Marty Stuart, Rodney Crowell and Norman Blake.

    Side 1.
    1. Diamonds In The Rough
    2. Ring Of Fire
    3. The Far Side Banks Of Jordan
    4. Losin You
    5. Gatsbys Restaurant
    6. Wings Of Angels
    7. The L&N Dont Stop Here Anymore


    Side 2.
    1. Once Before I Die
    2. I Used To Be Somebody
    3. Tall Lover Man
    4. Tiffany Anastasia Lowe
    5. Meeting In The Air
    6. Will The Circle Be Unbroken

    June Carter Cash
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sweet Honey Bee Sweet Honey Bee Quick View

    $15.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Sweet Honey Bee

    Pianist/composer Duke Pearson leads an all-star group on this run-through of seven of his compositions. The musicians (trumpeter Freddie Hubbard, altoist James Spaulding, Joe Henderson on tenor, bassist Ron Carter, drummer Mickey Roker, and the pianist/leader) are actually more impressive than many of the compositions, although the swinging minor-toned Big Bertha deserved to become a standard. The frameworks are quite intelligent (and everyone doesn't solo on each selection), and the improvisations are concise and clearly related to each tune's melody and mood.


    Released 1967

    Recorded December 7, 1966

    1. Sweet Honey Bee
    2. Sudel
    3. After The Rain
    4. Gaslight
    5. Big Bertha
    6. Empathy
    7. Ready Rudy?
    Duke Pearson
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP Reissue - Sealed Buy Now
  • Afro Classic (Speakers Corner) Afro Classic (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Afro Classic (Speakers Corner)

    In the Seventies, fusion was a popular pigeonhole for music somewhere between jazz and pop. At the same time it was also an often used, belittling term employed by critics and representatives of 'pure' jazz, who never wanted to listen to it, let alone include any of the numerous LPs in their collection.



    Forty years later, the dust has settled. Flautist Hubert Laws' recordings not only for the Atlantic but also the CTI labels are treasured - especially the present LP, which was produced by the 'Master of Sound' Creed Taylor. Now these crossover numbers from the worlds of classic, jazz, pop and easy listening are available once more. Discover, for example, Al Kooper's composition Fire And Rain (more familiar are the versions from Blood, Sweat & Tears and James Taylor), the famous theme music from the film Love Story, and three classical compositions by J. S. Bach and Mozart. All have been given a facelift and with such super sidemen ranging from Ron Carter to Bob James and a superb Freddie Waits on the drums, they are a real treat.
    So cast aside any preconceptions and enjoy this meticulous production and the clear reproduction on vinyl.



    Musicians:



    • Hubert Laws (flute)

    • Don Sebesky (arranger)

    • Fred Alston, Jr. (bassoon)

    • Bob James (electric piano)

    • Gene Bertoncini (guitar)

    • David Friedman (vibraphone)

    • Ron Carter (bass)

    • Airto, Richie 'Pablo' Landrum (percussion)

    • Fred Waits (drums)




    Recording: December 1970 at Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA

    Production: Creed Taylor





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Fire and Rain
    2. Allegro from Concerto No. 3 in D
    3. Theme from Love Story
    4. Passacaglia in C Minor
    5. Flute Sonata in F
    Hubert Laws
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Nachash Nachash Quick View

    $25.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Nachash

    Signed to Spinefarm Records worldwide and featuring members & previous members of Cry For Silence, Hexes, Gallows & SikTh, Krokodil have just put
    the seal on their debut studio album.


    With all of the personnel coming complete with 'other lives', it's taken a genuine commitment to the cause to launch something new, plus a collective
    excitement at what that 'something new' might be in this case, a record that, according to Krokodil guitarist Daniel P Carter of Radio One Rock Show
    and Hexes repute, "will be the start of something pretty special ".


    Flanking Carter on beards, riffs, rhythms and roars are a choice selection of players whose many and varied abilities to make a glorious racket are already
    well documented; there's the SikTh rhythm section of Dan 'Loord' Foord (drums) and James Leach (bass); there's Cry For Silence guitarist, Alessandro
    Venturella; Laurent Barnard, from the heady world of Gallows; and upfront at the mic, Liber Necris vocalist Simon Wright, the six coming together to
    create a body of work that succeeds in marrying brutal aggression to haunting melody, heavy groove and coiled-spring dynamics; music that isn't afraid to
    (sometimes) take the less travelled path

    1. Shatter
    2. Skin Of The Earth
    3. Dead Man's Path
    4. A Life Live In Copper, But Painted In Gold
    5. Reptilia Familiar
    6. Porcelain Bones
    7. The Collapse
    8. Sleep Well, Medusa
    9. Ragnarock
    10. Sun Riders
    11. Sobek
    12. Phyllotaxis
    Krokodil
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Wild Horses Rock Steady Wild Horses Rock Steady Quick View

    $14.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Wild Horses Rock Steady

    Johnny Hammond's 1972 soul-jazz beauty is another stunning example of great creativity at Creed Taylor's Kudu label through the mid-'70s. Arranged by Bob James, Hammond's trademark B-3 work is showcased here on six extended cover versions of tunes from the pop vernacular. The lineup includes guitarists George Benson, Eric Gale, and Melvin Sparks, saxophonists Grover Washington, Jr. and Pepper Adams, bassist Ron Carter (playing electric as well as double bass), and drummers Bernard Purdie and Billy Cobham! There are grooves galore in this wondrously mixed set, from the smoking guitar breaks in the read of Aretha Franklin's Rock Steady to the syncopated organ pyrotechnics in It's Impossible, with Washington playing his ass off around Hammond's organ breaks, and the beautiful horn arrangements by James in Peace Train. The funky-butt glimmer in I Don't Know How to Love Him could have been played by the Stax/Volt horns with a Funk Brothers rhythm section. James weaves a string section in harmonic counterpoint to Hammond's organ in the melody, creating a moving tapestry of textures against the backbeat. But nothing can prepare the listener for the closing cover of Jagger and Richard's Wild Horses, with a military snare beat providing an unlikely intro to an All Along the Watchtower-like progression that transforms itself seamlessly into a darkly minor reading of the original melody, with beautiful fills by Benson and Sparks. When the horns kick in during the refrain with plenty of fuzz guitar and bass over the top, the listener falls headlong into the magic of dirty groove and roll.

    - Thom Jurek (All Music)
    1. Rock Steady
    2. Who Is Sylvia?
    3. Peace Train
    4. I Don't Know How to Love Him
    5. It's Impossible
    6. Wild Horses
    Johnny Hammond
    $14.99
    Vinyl LP Reissue - Sealed Buy Now
  • Body Talk (Speakers Corner) Body Talk (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Body Talk (Speakers Corner)

    Just listen to the first thirty seconds of this LP and you know that it's all about the 'Godfather of Soul' - the unique James Brown.



    But it's just as obvious that such a great artist as George Benson doesn't just present "Greatest Hits" in a new guise. Six of his own compositions plus one by Donny Hathaway/Gene McDaniels provide the guitarist and singer with a great platform to launch from. He shoots off into orbit, accompanied by first-class guest soloists such as Jon Faddis, Frank Foster, Earl Klugh and Jack DeJohnnette. Ron Carter's bass doesn't boom in the low register but offers a light and airy, yet solid, base.



    Body Talk is by no means the declaration of a world-shaking, new and avant-garde jazz. It is, however, a successful blend of jazz, soul and fusion. And when such a superb arranger as Pee Wee Ellis has his finger in the pie - or rather: his pen on the manuscript paper - then one can be sure that the almost 50-minute-long LP is a great success from beginning to end. Finally, one shouldn't forget the helping hand of the producer Creed Taylor, who made a significant contribution to this milestone on the CTI label.



    Musicians:



    • George Benson (guitar, vocal)

    • Frank Foster (tenor saxophone)

    • Gerald Chamberlain, Dick Griffin (trombone)

    • Jon Faddis, John Gatchell, Waymon Reed (fluegel horn, trumpet)

    • Harold Mabern (electric piano)

    • Earl Klugh (guitar)

    • Ron Carter, Gary King (bass)

    • Jack DeJohnette (drums)

    • Mobutu (percussion)



    Recording: July 1973 at Van Gelder Studios, Englewood Cliffs, NJ (USA), by Rudy Van Gelder

    Production: Creed Taylor



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Dance
    2. When Love Has Grown
    3. Plum
    4. Body Talk
    5. Top Of The World
    George Benson
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Gerry Mulligan & Chet Baker: Carnegie Hall Concert (Speakers Corner) Gerry Mulligan & Chet Baker: Carnegie Hall Concert (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Gerry Mulligan & Chet Baker: Carnegie Hall Concert (Speakers Corner)

    The third encounter of the cool, swinging art of Gerry Mulligan and Chet Baker took place in New York's Carnegie Hall on a cold November day in 1974. So-called Cool Jazz had long since arrived and become popular on the East Coast with the result that the concert hall must have been filled to the last seat. The two hadn't performed together on stage for ten years, rivalry and who knows what else had put an end to the highly successful pianoless quartet.



    In spite of the enormously high expectations - the Carnegie Hall fills all musicians with awe due to the echoes of concerts given by such classical and jazz great as Artur Rubinstein, George Gershwin and their successors over many generations - every melody is wonderfully relaxed from the very first note on. This is surely due to the excellent rhythm group (with piano!). This is made up of musicians from the 'new generation' - musicians who were sucking on dummies in their prams when the two veterans came together for the first time in 1952.
    Oldies such as Bernie's Tune, My Funny Valentine and Line For Lyons, and new compositions like Song For Strayhorn and Song For An Unfinished Woman constitute a successful blend both for the two performers on stage and the audience alike. And there is no experimenting - no one wants to play or hear that - however the high level of communication is tangible everywhere.



    It makes sense to release the two individual LPs as a double album. What's more: the cover photo is exactly the same for both releases and you get almost 80 minutes of West Coast cool-hot jazz at its very best!



    Musicians:



    • Gerry Mulligan (bassoon)

    • Chet Baker (trumpet)

    • Ed Byrne (trombone)

    • Bob James (piano, electric piano)

    • John Scofield (guitar)

    • Dave Samuels (vibraphone)

    • Ron Carter (bass)

    • Harvey Mason (drums)




    Recording: November 1974 at Carnegie Hall, New York, by Dave Hewitt and John Venable

    Production: Creed Taylor





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Line for Lyons
    2. For an Unfinished Woman
    3. My Funny Valentine
    4. Song for Strayhorn
    5. It's Sandy at the Beach
    6. K-4 Pacific
    7. There Will Never Be Another You
    8. Bernie's Tune
    Gerry Mulligan
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Womanchild Womanchild Quick View

    $35.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Womanchild

    When CÉcile McLorin Salvant arrived at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC to compete in the finals of the 2010 Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition, she was not only the youngest finalist, but also a mystery woman with the most unusual background of any of the participants. When she walked away with first place in the jazz world's most prestigious contest, the buzz began almost immediately. If anything, it has intensified in the months leading up to the launch of her Mack Avenue Records debut, WomanChild.


    "She has poise, elegance, soul, humor, sensuality, power, virtuosity, range, insight, intelligence, depth and grace," Wynton Marsalis asserts. "I've never heard a singer of her generation who has such a command of styles," remarks pianist Aaron Diehl. "She radiates authority," critic Ben Ratliff wrote in The New York Times in response to one of her post-competition performances, and a few weeks later his colleague Stephen Holden announced that "Ms. McLorin Salvant has it all.... If anyone can extend the lineage of the Big Three-Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughan and Ella Fitzgerald-it is this 23-year-old virtuoso."


    Yet at almost every step of the way, McLorin Salvant has followed a different path from her peers. Born in Miami to a French mother and Haitian father, McLorin Salvant's first language was French. She immersed herself in the classical music tradition, long before she turned to jazz-starting on piano at age five and joining the Miami Choral Society at age eight. When it came time for college, McLorin Salvant bypassed all the US conservatories and jazz schools, heading instead to Aix-en-Provence in France, where she continued to develop as a singer, but with an emphasis on classical and baroque vocal music as well as jazz.
    There, thousands of miles away from jazz's land of origin, McLorin Salvant entered into a fruitful partnership with reed player and teacher Jean-François Bonnel, first as a student and soon as a performer. Before returning to the US, she gave concerts in Paris, recorded with Bonnel's quintet, and immersed herself in the early jazz and blues vocal tradition. By the time she returned to her home country to take the stage in the Monk Competition, she had drawn on this unusual set of formative experiences in shaping a personal style of jazz singing, surprising and dramatic by turns, and very much in contrast to that of the other participants and McLorin Salvant's contemporaries.


    In the aftermath of McLorin Salvant's triumph at the Monk Competition, the jazz world eagerly awaited the winner's first US recording. Answering that call with WomanChild, McLorin Salvant draws on songs spanning three centuries of American music. "I like to choose songs that are a little unknown or have been recorded very few times," McLorin Salvant notes. "While these songs aren't recognized as standards, many should be because they are so beautifully crafted."


    On the album, her repertoire ranges from the 19th century ballad "John Henry," refreshed in a spirited up-to- date arrangement, to McLorin Salvant's own 21st century waltz "Le Front CachÉ Sur Tes Genoux" which draws on a poem by Haitian writer Ida Salomon Faubert for its lyric. She is joined by a world class band who share her concern for creating jazz of today by drawing on vibrant traditions of the past: pianist Aaron Diehl and bassist Rodney Whitaker (both of whom are Mack Avenue label mates), guitarist James Chirillo and master drummer Herlin Riley.


    The old and new rub shoulders throughout this album, but this singer's attitude is neither beholden to the past nor trying to anticipate the trends of the future. Her captivating singing is immersed in the immediacy of the present moment. So much so, that those who have seen McLorin Salvant in concert marvel at how she radiates the confidence and poise of a mature artist even though she is just at the dawn of her own career.


    McLorin Salvant may have the deepest roots of any singer of her generation. She knows the sounds and styles of modern jazz but also possesses complete command of the classic blues and early American vocal tradition. She has studied the entire recorded legacy of the great Bessie Smith (1894-1937), often called the Empress of the Blues, and also has deep familiarity with Valaida Snow, Bert Williams and other early masters of American music. For her, these musicians are exponents of living traditions that she has drawn into the orbit of her own work.


    However, McLorin Salvant can't be pinned down as a jazz traditionalist. Alongside fellow Monk Competition winner Jacky Terrasson, she has recorded works by John Lennon/Yoko Ono and Erik Satie, and can sing in French, Spanish or English as the mood and situation warrant. Knowledgeable jazz fans will identify the influence and inspiration from some of the most distinctive modern jazz stylists, such as Betty Carter, Carmen McRae and Abbey Lincoln. She is also currently continuing her studies of the classical and baroque tradition. In short, McLorin Salvant is a seeker and a creative spirit who is determined to push ahead, even while she shows an extraordinary command of the tradition that has preceded her.


    In his article in The New York Times, critic Stephen Holden listed some of the virtues of McLorin Salvant's singing: "perfect pitch and enunciation, a playful sense of humor, a rich and varied tonal palette, a supple sense of swing, exquisite taste in songs and phrasing, and a deep connection to lyrics." Her musical skills are considerable, but they are matched by an interpretive ability that is almost more akin to an actor's than a singer's. She draws out the story hidden inside the song, and can draw on the elements of her own personality and a full gamut of emotional stances-from the darkly troubling to the richly comic-in bringing lyrics to life.


    "I want to get as close to the center of the song as I can," McLorin Salvant explains. "When I find something beautiful and touching I try to get close to it, and share that with the audience."


    On WomanChild, McLorin Salvant gives music lovers the chance to hear why the illustrious judges at the Monk Competition gave her top honors. McLorin Salvant is still a bit of a mystery, but she will hardly be a secret any longer.

    1. St. Louis Gal
    2. I Didn't Know What Time It Was
    3. Nobody
    4. WomanChild
    5. Prelude/There's A Lull In My Life
    6. You Bring Out The Savage In Me
    7. Baby Have Pity On Me
    8. John Henry
    9. Jitterbug Waltz
    10. What A Little Moonlight Can Do
    11. Deep Dark Blue
    Cecile McLorin Salvant
    $35.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • 1
Go to top