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I Think You Think Too Much Of Me

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  • i think you think too much of me i think you think too much of me Quick View

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    i think you think too much of me

    Pressed On Clear Vinyl


    Shortly after his End Credits tour, Ng announced his new EP, I Think You Think Too Much of Me. The first single, Sex, was released on June 10, 2016. The single has a greater focus on vocals and instrumentation.


    The EP features other songs that have been released before under The Eden Project, such as Circles, Fumes, and XO.

    1. sex
    2. drugs
    3. and
    4. rock + roll
    5. Fumes
    6. XO
    7. Circles
    EDEN
    $13.99
    Colored Vinyl EP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I Know What Love Isn't I Know What Love Isn't Quick View

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    I Know What Love Isn't

    Tracey Thorn wrote a song that reached Jens Lekman in the early stages of his new album, I Know What Love Isn't. In her song she sang Oh Jens, oh Jens/your songs seem to look through a different lens/you're still so young, love ends just as easy as it's begun. A touching moment for the Swedish songwriter, having been a fan since his teens. But it came to him in a time when he found himself very confused and in doubt. He was changing and, subsequently, so were his songs. They weren't looking through that lens anymore.



    I Know What Love Isn't came out of a break up, something Jens didn't see as worth writing about at first. The songs began more fleeting than the last go around, on his 2007 album Night Falls Over Kortedala. The songs began building from images and memories and soon began to take their own route, one that Lekman wasn't privy to their destination.



    In The World Moves On he paints a picture of a sweltering summer in the city of Melbourne where he lived while writing and recording the album. The hot days that led up to the Black Saturday bushfires, but also more mundane images of feeding possums in a park or getting in trouble with some guy on a scooter. It seems to lead nowhere at first but the aimlessness in itself reaches heartbreaking conclusions later on, summed up by the soaring chorus and you don't get over a broken heart, you just learn to carry it gracefully. Like Joan Didion once said that she writes entirely to find out what she's thinking, Jens wrote until he caught up with his thoughts. And of course they led him right back to the break up.



    Musically, I Know What Love Isn't chooses an economic route. From the vast palette he created for Kortedala, he's only chosen a few somber colors this time around. There are strings but not a string section, an upright piano and not a grand, a single saxophone and gracenotes from a flute. The songs are lighter, almost aerodynamic, Jens explains, I wanted the songs to take off almost unnoticeably, where the chorus is separated from the verse only through a small detail like a tambourine or a harmony. Like when you're in an airplane taking off and you look out the window and realize you're already in the air.



    A dry country piano makes Become Someone Else's lift high. Vocals from Melbourne singer Sophie Brous makes the chorus in Erica America soar. Strings pick up the title track and send it up to the sky without much effort or force. In the latter, Lekman once again points the way to distill essential truths from every day life vignettes while singing about a sham marriage. I thought of the Friday nights when I'd be cruising up and down the street with my best friend in her old crappy Holden, talking about getting married to get me into the country.



    The idea was so appealing, that we would build this constructed relationship around a purpose rather than some vague feeling that could change at anytime. But in the end, the sham marriage is much too great a story to be kept secret. At least when you make a living from telling stories. And that's what I Know What Love Isn't is. A collection of songs that grew to a story that had to be told. A story that is not new, but essentially human. The story of the grey areas of love that you have to excavate and explore, using the method of exclusion, to find out what love is.

    1. Every Little Hair Knows Your Name
    2. Erica America
    3. Become Someone Else's
    4. She Just Don't Want To Be With You Anymore
    5. Some Dandruff On Your Shoulder
    6. I Want A Pair Of Cowboy Boots
    7. The World Moves On
    8. The End Of The World Is Bigger Than Love
    9. I Know What Love Isn't
    10. Every Little Hair Knows Your Name
    Jens Lekman
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Out Of The Black Out Of The Black Quick View

    $24.99
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    Out Of The Black

    The raucous, schizophrenic sound of Out Of The Black - much like previous Boys Noize records - has as much to do more with Ridha's attention span as his choice in gear. "I get bored really easily with sounds," he explains, "The exciting part for me is trying to come up with new sounds, putting new sounds in a new dress. I'm sound obsessed. I buy a lot of machines and synths, and I'm always looking for a way to destroy sounds in an unconventional way. I'm always drawn to music and productions that sound entirely different or really naïve or sometimes just stupid. I don´t like it when it sounds too clean and generic, there needs to be some sort of soul. I guess that explains a lot about my sound which I think I instinctually capture. But I do try to keep in mind what I loved about dance music when I started doing this and how it made me feel. Those thoughts were also very much on my mind when I was making this record."


    The new album nicely bridges the gap between his previous two efforts; providing the requisite in-your-face electro bang of classic Boys Noize on tracks like "What You Want", "Rocky 2" and "XTC", or more melodic songs like "Ich R U" and "Reality". At a time when mainstream electronic music-particularly the pervasive cultures of EDM and dubstep-have moved dance music out of the clubs and into the stadiums, Ridha is quick to acknowledge the old school house and acid records that shaped him as a DJ; the very same records that continue to bubble up as an influence on Out of the Black.


    "I never compromise when it comes to creative or musical things," says Ridha. "I only do what I think is cool and what I like. It's not about what the market wants or what people expect. Maintaining artistic freedom has always been the most important thing to me - for my own music or for anyone on my label." As for the title of his new record, Ridha explains that this music isn't coming from out of the blue. In fact, it's the opposite. "I tend to make and produce music only at night," he says. "I also generally only perform at night, so this is music that's coming totally out of the black. Also, they say the color black can absorb all other colors, which is a cool way to think about making music. You absorb every other kind of music-every possible sound-and what comes out of you is something new, something out of the black."

    1. What You Want
    2. XTC
    3. Missile
    4. ICH R U
    5. Rocky 2
    6. Ich Jack
    7. Circus Full Of Clowns (feat. Gizzle)
    8. Touch It
    9. Conchord (feat. Siriusmo)
    10. Reality
    11. Merlin
    12. Got It (feat. Snoop Dogg)
    13. Stop
    14. Yellow (feat. Siriusmo)
    Boys Noize
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP + CD - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Guilt Trips Guilt Trips Quick View

    $19.99
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    Guilt Trips

    Canada's own Ryan Hemsworth has become one of the fastest rising producers and remix artist in the past couple of years. Since his first official release in 2012 Last Words on West Coast label Wedidit Collective, he's gained notoriety for his original production and collaborations, and has since then amassed fans and charmed critics all over the world- meanwhile touring Europe, Australia, and North America with the likes of Bauuer, Daedelus, and others.


    Now, the man some call "The Internet Zack Morris" and "The Remix Ryan Gosling" is proud to announce his debut album Guilt Trips on famed label Last Gang Records due out in 2013.


    On this newest full length, Hemsworth digs deeper beyond the hip hop, r&b and dance music world to inspirations that sprout from a time before he made the type of music that people have come to expect.


    "For this project, I wanted to just expand on everything, lay as much as I could out on the table," he explains. "There's a lot more of me on this than my last projects. With a lot of the songs, I had high school in mind and during that time I was making music with my voice, guitar, and samples, so I've gone back to the first two a bit more, and also getting help from vocalists. Some of the club music that I've been surrounded by in the past year can be really cold, so I think once you throw in more melody and emotion that can only come from the human voice and guitar, it becomes a lot warmer."


    "I reached out to friends and people I admire really. I wanted kind of unexpected collaborations and people with a uniqueness to them, instead of just reaching out to random top-liners. Someone like Lofty305, who has a weird, certainly not trained voice, made sense for "Against A Wall" because I wanted it to match the mood of the track. That's so much more important to me than making a perfect song. I just wanted to flesh out that charming imperfection on a lot of the tracks. When I asked the people on it to do their parts, I didn't direct them too much but just asked them to think of a breakup or a time when they felt weird or shitty from love. All of my music is sparked from love in some form or another I think, so this album is kind of just a capsule of different moods caused by love."

    1. Small + Lost (featuring Sinead Harnett)
    2. Against A Wall (featuring Lofty 305)
    3. Weird Life
    4. Still Cold (featuring Baths)
    5. Avec Vous
    6. Happiness & Dreams Forever
    7. Yaeko Mitamura Is Lonely
    8. Ryan Must Be Destroyed
    9. One For Me (featuring Tinashe)
    10. Day/Night/Sleep System (featuring Haleek Maul and Kitty)
    Ryan Hemsworth
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Feel The Noise Feel The Noise Quick View

    $18.99
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    Feel The Noise

    Yeah, it's a concept man. Rock n' roll... remember that? Well I do, like it was yesterday. Standing on the corner of Hollywood & Vine in LA or on Columbus & Broadway in front of Aquarius Records in North Beach San Francisco circa 1975... Thinking that all I wanted to do is rock out, so sick of everything I was hearing on the radio, all those bands seemed to suck to me, I couldn't understand what happened to the real rock n roll that I grew up on. Where did it go ? Where were the balls? Where were the guts? Where were the songs that blew my mind, the guitar licks, the harmonies... what happened? For too many years after that all I heard was the same old thing... "rock n roll is dead". Every time I heard it, it made me mad, it made me think... yeah... FUCK YOU! Then I heard the Ramones, and things got better for a while, and then it got bad again. Then I heard Nirvana and things got better again for a while, then they got bad again, but at that point I didn't really care anymore because I knew that Rock N Roll was never gonna die... you know why? Because there will always be a new generation of kids who will dig this shit as much as I do... Feel The Noise! Remember kids, the future is in your hands! Keep on Rocking!

    Paul Collins
    1. Feel The Noise
    2. Only Girl
    3. Baby I Want You
    4. I Need My Rock 'n' Roll
    5. Don't Know How to Treat A Lady
    6. With A Girl Like You
    7. For All Eyes To See
    8. Little Suzy
    9. Can't Get You Off My Mind
    10. Baby I'm In Love With You
    11. Reach Out I'll Be There
    12. Walk Away
    Paul Collins
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I'm Not The Devil I'm Not The Devil Quick View

    $24.99
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    I'm Not The Devil

    Cody Jinks was raised on country music but he cut his teeth on metal. "Metallica was king. They set the tone for me and I spent a good part of my youth wanting to be James Hetfield." After a dedicated stint as a frontman in a thrash metal band, Jinks willingly found himself back to where it all began. "My dad loved the outlaw country icons, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings and Merle Haggard. That never ending consistency of incredible music growing up laid some very deep seeds. I'm mean, come on nothing better than mentally diving into 'The Hag' and metal when it comes time for me to write songs."


    Always avoiding trends and ferociously choosing his direction was the only option from day one, even though that very path could have prevented success. "What is success if you can't wake up everyday being who you really are. In the end, that will catch up with you." Jinks has been tested countless times by his career choices. The better part of the last 15 years have included numerous empty bar rooms and a never ending financial loss. "Yeah, I've been pretty good at losing money. Not the greatest feeling in the world to be gone from home for long stretches of time, only to walk in the door broke. Luckily I've got a damn good woman in my life. She has stood by me with unmeasurable strength to say the least and it is an absolute fact that I seriously overplayed my hand when landing her."


    His long, dark beard and endless array of tattoos are no fad. They unquestionably define Cody Jinks. His prototypical metal/hard rock band frontman look is not a well orchestrated image, but again, define Cody Jinks. Diving into to his album, I'm Not the Devil is the perpetual truth of who he is and where he has found himself at this point in his career. "I'm just glad that I ended up where I am now," Jinks said. "It makes complete sense that I'm at this place in my life. Country music found me when I was young and chased me down as I grew older"


    Jinks' latest project is his deepest, darkest and most provocative album to date, with a metal common denominator, the apocalypse, running throughout the record. "It's a pretty scary time," Jinks said. "There are some evil people running things in the world. It hits me since I have a six and three-year old."
    There's not a weightier song than the aptly titled "Heavy Load." It's the most apocalyptic song on the album but the dense cut, with a pretty violin break, is a gorgeous tune. The vocal hook grabs ears when Jinks croons "Train Jumps Tracks Some Time Ago/You Can't Root That Heavy Load." "That was the last song I wrote on the record," Jinks said. "I couldn't be happier how that one turned out."


    "All You Can" features a pretty piano line and sobering wordplay. When Jinks belts out 'What Are You Living For," you can't help but think about the serious question posed in what is becoming an increasingly shallow existence. "I was really tired when I wrote that song," Jinks said. "We had been on the road for awhile. The bottom line is that if you're not helping people, you're not doing your job as a human being. It's time to quit feeling sorry for yourself and do something."
    One of Jinks' favorite songs on the album is "The Way I Am," a cover of a Merle Haggard classic. "I love that song," Jinks says. "I wrapped it up just before Merle died. The song always resonated with me. I relate to that one since there are times I would rather be out fishing."


    "No Words" is a stunner of a gritty, autobiographical love song, which is a throwback to how songs used to be written. It is a tuneful gem, inspired by reality. Jinks starts out dark as night. "My Whole View of the World has Changed/ I Guess that Comes with Age/I Don't Believe there is Good in Every Man Like I Did Back Then/I May Drink More Than I Should/You've Seen Me on the Floor/I Spent my Lifetime in this Cage I Built Around Me." But the song is actually a tip of the hat to his beloved wife of 19 years. "There Aint' No Words/ To Say How Much I Need You/With You Here/ You Make This Life I Lead Worth Living." "It's about my wife," Jinks says. "But the funny thing is that she doesn't like it. She thinks it sounds too sad."


    With the title track "I'm Not the Devil," Jinks wakes us all up to the realities of mistakes and the heartfelt desire to be forgiven. "We are all guilty of mistakes and very guilty of pointing out the mistakes of others. Forgiveness feels so much better or so I think."


    It's impressive how Jinks is getting his message across. Jinks utilizes space well in his songs. Notes aren't crammed in. Jinks lets his songs breathe. "After all I've experienced, I think I've matured," Jinks says. "I think you can hear it in the music. I've grown up."


    Even though he still looks the part of the headbanger he was back in the day, he has moved on. "It's all for the best, Jinks says. "I'm where I was meant to be."


    It's all about the music and the fans, who are the fuel that drives Jinks. "They come out night after night giving up hard earned money and precious time to see me play," Jinks says. " It's truly is amazing when you really think about it. The best way I can say thanks is by giving back with effort and gratitude."

    1. The Same
    2. I'm Not the Devil
    3. No Guarantees
    4. No Words
    5. Give All You Can
    6. She's All Mine
    7. The Way I Am
    8. Chase That Song
    9. Heavy Load
    10. Grey
    11. Church at Gaylor Creek
    12. Vampires
    13. Hand Me Down
    Cody Jinks
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I'm Only Dreaming I'm Only Dreaming Quick View

    $19.99
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    I'm Only Dreaming

    Tyler, TX-based indie pop outfit Eisley has announced I'm Only Dreaming, the band's fifth full-length, which was produced by Will Yip (Circa Survive, Balance & Composure, Lauryn Hill) and will be released via Equal Vision Records.


    Vocalist/guitarist Sherri DuPree-Bemis opened up about "You Are Mine" revealing, "This song is about loving someone deeply and the beauty and challenges that come with being in a long-term, committed relationship. You're going to argue, you're going to rub each other wrong and disagree and drive each other absolutely crazy sometimes but at the end of the day you just want to be together. ('You're my everything, my sun and moon, you make me swoon; Wake me up, talk too much, piss me off, but you are mine')."


    I'm Only Dreaming stays true to form of the band's signature dreamy sound, with DuPree-Bemis elaborating, "Musically, you could say it's classic Eisley, in the sense that it's melodic, moody pop and is written from the heart. Lyrically, it's very whimsical; it has a vibe that will take you into its own world and let you escape your normal life for a few minutes. I like to cloak things in a little mystery and romance; I think it's part of what makes all of Eisley's songs sound like they're from the same world. Every record is like opening and reading a book in a series."

    1. Always Wrong
    2. Defeatist
    3. A Song for the Birds
    4. Sparking
    5. My Best Friend
    6. Rabbit Hole
    7. Louder Than a Lion
    8. You Are Mine
    9. When You Fall
    10. Snowfall
    11. Brightest Fire
    Eisley
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Nightbringers (Pre-Order) Nightbringers (Pre-Order) Quick View

    $25.99
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    Nightbringers (Pre-Order)

    Any band that has earned an army of devout followers through dropping seven killer full-lengths - and touring their collective ass off for sixteen years - could perhaps be forgiven for thinking they could take it easy as they wade into their eighth release. But that's just not The Black Dahlia Murder's style, and Nightbringers is testament to that. Having released their most accomplished, aggressive, and emotionally diverse music to date in the form of 2015's Abysmal, the Michigan quintet have once more pushed themselves to new heights, and the 34 minutes of searing melodic death metal that comprises Nightbringers is riveting listening. "I always feel a responsibility to the people who support this band when we start making a new record," asserts vocalist Trevor Strnad. "The pressure that comes from people being excited to hear what you come up with next can be intimidating, but it's so exciting that those people love you so much for just doing what you do. It makes you want to honor what you've done in the past, but also excite them with where you go next, and that definitely drove us on Nightbringers. When we started writing I honestly didn't know we had this album in us, and I feel really proud of it. It's a great moment for us."


    Rather than meticulously plan things out or stick rigidly to any kind of template, when it comes to writing The Black Dahlia Murder prefer to let things happen organically. In the hands of guitarist Brian Eschbach - who co-founded the band with Strnad in 2001 - and new recruit Brandon Ellis (Cannabis Corpse/ex-Arsis) Nightbringers is rich with dynamic riffs that are at once fresh and classic TBDM, resulting in a collection that shifts through many moods and effortlessly incorporates various elements of extreme metal. With guitarist Ryan Knight having amicably stepped down in 2016, the addition of twenty-four-year-old Ellis to the band's ranks has helped usher in an exciting new era. "He's very professional for his age, I think he's skilled far beyond his years, and his live energy is exceptional. When Max (Lavelle, bass) joined the band he challenged a lot of us on stage to raise our personal bar, and Brandon's pushed that even further," states Strnad. "Brandon coming into the band and writing a bunch of songs was an awesome surprise too. He really took the reins, and this record is also the most involved that Alan (Cassidy drums) has been too. The way that we were doing the demos and bouncing things back and forth he had a lot of room to do what he wanted to do, and I think it's definitely a more colorful album for that. I also think as we get older the emotional content goes up. I think we better realize how to grip the listener. Personally, I try to write lyrics that are going to match each part, and kind of ramp up those feelings that we're putting across." Strnad's statements are vividly borne out by every moment of Nightbringers. For fans attending 2017's Summer Slaughter tour, the first taste of of the record came with the inclusion of the title track in their set, which has an undeniable immediacy to it, rich with hooks and boasting a "circusy, evil and playful" air. By contrast, "Catacomb Hecatomb" is suffused with tragedy, the mournful tone of its slower passages deeply affecting. This too is dramatically different to "As Good As Dead", which has some swagger to it that Strnad likens to Megadeth, or "Matriarch", described by Eschbach as a "wild, neoclassical romp" and stands as one of the most cutthroat and all out aggressive tracks in the quintet's arsenal. Upon first hearing the latter, Strnad was intent on matching its visceral intensity. "I felt inspired to write very violent lyrics to it. It's told from the perspective of a woman who is trying to have a child and not having any luck, and she goes kind of crazy and stalks this other woman who is due to have a child. She finds her moment to take it from her, cutting it right out of her stomach." While Strnad explores a variety of themes and ideas with his lyrics, they are united by the album's title, which embraces a tenet that has been central to The Black Dahlia Murder's output since the very beginning. "A lot of archaic ideas that are still upheld - such as marriage and monogamy - came from Christianity, whether people want to acknowledge it or not, and to me, death metal has always been bucking that. It's 'being-the-villain music', because we're the enemy of Christianity, the enemy of all that is good and traditional. Death metal is for free thinkers, it's for showing people the path to inner strength and operating on your own will, instead of being told what to do and living in fear, and songs like the title track and "Kings Of The Nightworld" are about leading a legion of awakened minds into battle." Following this theme also motivated Strnad to forge into ever-darker territory, even when this meant tearing things up and starting over. "I felt I needed to rise to the occasion to make as much of the blood and guts and heinousness as possible, and there was actually a couple of points where I rewrote some songs. I just didn't feel like they were dark enough, or violent enough, so I was really trying to ramp up the monstrous aspects of things, and definitely trying in different ways to take down tradition."


    Rather than decamp to a single studio, the members split off when it came time to start laying down the songs - all well versed in how to get the best out of their individual performances. With former bassist Ryan Williams once again assisting, the drums were tracked at The Pipe Yard in Plymouth, Michigan and rhythm guitars in the band's practice space in Warren, Michigan [was bass tracked there too?]. Ellis then recorded his many blistering solos in his home studio, while Strnad headed to Full Force Studios on Long Island, with Joe Cincotta (Suffocation, Internal Bleeding) overseeing his sessions. For the unique and haunting cover art they turned to Kristian Wåhlin, aka Necrolord, who has designed seminal artwork for the likes of At The Gates, Bathory, Emperor and also TBDM's 2007 release, Nocturnal. "I think he's the most prominent artist when it comes to classic releases in the melodic death metal genre, and kind of bringing things full circle with it being the ten-year anniversary of Nocturnal felt right. By now people probably wouldn't have expected us to go back to him, so it's kind of a surprise, but at the same time it's a very classic cover too." With the band celebrating the 10-year anniversary of the aforementioned album by playing it in its entirety on Summer Slaughter, it has given them a moment to reflect not only on the road that has led them to here but also that which lies ahead. "When I think back to when we started the band I feel very proud of everything we've done, and I also see a lot of improvement over the years," says Strnad. "In the early songs I can hear us as kids, and then segueing into our adulthood as musicians and writers, but sixteen years in I still feel young as a band. I feel like we have a shit ton left to do, and I think we're sitting pretty with the best lineup we've ever had. I also think Nightbringers could be our finest hour yet. I feel very strongly that it will affect people, I want to get all of these songs in people's ears, and I want them to check out everything we've got on this record. There's so much variety and so many great ideas, and I think that this could take us to another place."

    1. Widowmaker
    2. Of God and Serpent, of Spectre and Snake
    3. Matriarch
    4. Nightbringers
    5. Jars
    6. Kings of the Nightworld
    7. Catacomb Hecatomb
    8. As Good as Dead
    9. The Lonely Deceased
    The Black Dahlia Murder
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed PRE-ORDER Buy Now
  • Front Porch Sessions Front Porch Sessions Quick View

    $18.99
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    Front Porch Sessions

    Southern Indiana-bred singer-guitarist Reverend Peyton is the bigger-than-life frontman of Reverend Peyton's Big Damn Band. He has earned a reputation as both a singularly compelling performer and a persuasive evangelist for the rootsy country blues styles that captured his imagination early in life and inspired him and his band to make pilgrimages to Clarksdale, Mississippi to study under such blues masters as T-Model Ford, Robert Belfour and David "Honeyboy" Edwards.


    That passionate inspiration has made Reverend Peyton's Big Damn Band America's foremost country blues outfit and fuels the Rev's new release, The Front Porch Sessions. Peyton's dazzling guitar mastery is equaled here by his knack for vivid, emotionally impactful songwriting, and his originals are matched in their authenticity by the deeply felt vintage blues tunes that he covers. The album showcases the Rev's irrepressible personality while echoing the enduring spirit of such acoustic blues icons as Charlie Patton, Blind Willie Johnson, Bukka White and Furry Lewis, whose "When My Baby Left Me" receives a memorable reading.


    "It started as a literal whim on my part, but it turned into something really special," Reverend Peyton says of this new collection. "I wanted it to feel like you're on my front porch. You can almost hear the wood creaking."


    The Front Porch Sessions maintains a potent level of intensity throughout, from the upbeat optimism of the album-opener "We Deserve a Happy Ending" to the blunt slice-of-life rural reality of "One More Thing" to the rollicking, playful swagger of "Shakey Shirley," "One Bad Shoe" and "Cornbread and Butterbeans." Meanwhile, the instrumentals "It's All Night Long" and "Flying Squirrels" demonstrate the Rev's nimble, imaginative guitar work."


    I didn't have much planned when I went into the studio," the Reverend notes. "I went into the studio with some new songs and some old songs that I've always wanted to try. At first, I thought 'Well, maybe we'll make it a download or release a single.' But it took on a life of its own, and when it was all said and done, I was as proud of it as anything I've ever done. To me, it was a lesson in not overthinking things; I just went in and let my gut guide me."


    We recorded this album at a studio called Farm Fresh, which is right down the street from my house," he continues. "It's in the shade of the oldest poplar tree in Indiana, and there's a graveyard next to it and train tracks run across there. In fact, I think you can hear the train on one track on this record. The studio's in an old church, and the main sanctuary is the tracking room, so the haunting reverb that you hear is that room.


    "We used a lot of vintage gear in the recording. I love that organic sound, and I'm always chasing that in everything I do. I just like things that feel timeless. Feeling timeless to me is way more important than feeling old. When you try to make something sound old, you're trying too hard."


    That lifelong pursuit of musical authenticity was instilled in his musical consciousness while Peyton was growing up in rural Indiana, where his early love for blues, ragtime, folk, country and other traditional styles gave him a sense of direction that would soon manifest itself in his own music. He and the Big Damn Band won a large and loyal fan base, thanks to their tireless touring efforts and high-energy showmanship, along with such acclaimed albums as Big Damn Nation, The Gospel Album, The Whole Fam Damnily, The Wages, Between the Ditches, So Delicious and the Charlie Patton tribute disc Peyton on Patton.


    Despite his prior achievements, the Rev views The Front Porch Sessions as a personal creative milestone.


    "This record's very personal for me, because so much of it is just me," he says. "The Big Damn Band is on there, but it's mostly me. There's washboard only in a couple of songs, and the drum kit is a suitcase drum set that we put together in the studio. It's a snapshot of the week we spent in the studio, but it also represents a lifetime of me building up to it."


    The Front Porch Sessions has also spawned a series of audio-vÉritÉ companion videos, many of them shot on the Rev's actual front porch, that embody the album's intimacy and immediacy. "A lot of these songs started on the porch, and that's what the videos are," he says. "I'd be pickin' and go, 'I like the way this sounds, let me get my camera.'"


    Reverend Peyton has already begun to integrate The Front Porch Sessions' spare approach into the Big Damn Band's expansive live shows, which are renowned for their intensity and abandon.


    "In a lot of our shows in the past few years, we'll take a break and I'll come out and do a song or two by myself," he explains. "That brings things down and allows me to do some songs like this. We're definitely gonna be doing more of that, so there's definitely gonna be moments in the shows where you're gonna hear a lot of these songs. We may also do some Front Porch Sessions shows, and maybe present some of our other songs in a more stripped-down way. We did one earlier this year as kind of a test, and that worked really well.


    "Over the years, our shows have gotten more dynamic," he continues. "The ups are more up and the downs are more down. That's something that's important to me. If I go and see a show and someone's just standing there and staring at their feet and singing their songs, I feel insulted. That's not a performance. I want to know that you're living that song, not just regurgitating it. I don't think artists should seem like they're too cool for their audience."


    The Rev's dedication to delivering the goods on stage is reflected in his flamboyant performance persona. "The Rev is me," he states. "Sometimes that freaks people out, because the person who's on stage is exactly the way I am offstage. I don't know how to separate myself from my music, because it's so personal to me. My mom calls me Rev; it's been my nickname since I was a teenager. It was a name that was given to me by some friends, and it sort of stuck.


    "I'm one of those people who feels everything really hard, for better or worse," he continues. "If I'm angry, I'm really angry. If I'm sad, I'm really sad. If I'm happy, I'm really happy. So onstage, I tap into that. There are certain songs that I can't play on some nights, because they're just too sad. That may be the rantings of a crazy person, but it's the God's honest truth."


    With The Front Porch Sessions showcasing his expanded musical palette, Reverend Peyton is excited about bringing his new music to his fans.


    "I really think it's one of the best things I've ever done," he asserts. "I'm interested in making hand-made American music, and the goal is to be timeless."

    1. We Deserve a Happy Ending
    2. When My Baby Left Me
    3. Shakey Shirley
    4. What You Did to the Boy Ain't Right
    5. One Bad Shoe
    6. It's All Night Long
    7. One More Thing
    8. Flying Squirrels
    9. Let Your Light Shine
    10. When You Lose Your Money
    11. Cornbread and Butterbeans
    Reverend Peyton's Big Damn Band
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Satanist (Awaiting Repress) The Satanist (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

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    The Satanist (Awaiting Repress)


    Exclusive Bonus Track


    Double Gatefold Jacket


    24-Page LP Sized Book


    "The Satanist is magic. It's dangerous. It's adventurous, and it's organic," states Nergal, the driving force behind Behemoth since their inception in 1991, and brief exposure to the band's tenth album more than supports this statement. While instantly recognizable as the work of the Polish blackened death quartet it takes their sound in previously unimagined and riveting directions. A writhing, densely layered, brutally violent and sinister record, it is quite unlike anything ever unleashed within the canon of heavy music. As such it demands attention, offering ever greater sonic and emotional depths with every listen. "You may hear the title and think it's very primitive and one-dimensional, and yes it is, but when you look beyond that it's as primitive as it is complex and multidimensional, and that applies to everything about the record."


    It has been a rocky road leading to the realization of the album. Having dropped 2009s Evangelion to almost universal critical acclaim they saw it top the chart in their native country and dramatically expand their following around the world, and playing some of the best shows of their lives the band seemed truly unstoppable. But, in August 2010 Nergal was diagnosed with leukemia, stopping them in their tracks. Forced to abandon their ongoing tour in support of Evangelion Nergal was hospitalized, and both he and Behemoth faced an uncertain future. With the search for a bone marrow donor ultimately successful Nergal underwent a transplant, leaving the hospital after six months and beginning down the long road to rehabilitation. "I knew I was pretty much fucked and there was a battle to be won, and I had no fucking idea if it was going to take six months or twelve months or maybe four years, because with cancer you never know. I learned from being in the hospital that there are things in life that you can control and things that you can't control. The sooner you realize which is which it's going to make your life so much easier, and since then I started to focus on the right things. I could be determined, I could have discipline, I could have faith, but everything else is not under my control, and it really was a case of just crossing fingers for the best possible outcome. I was fortunate enough that that recovery period was relatively fast, and that I was really strong and very determined to get back into shape made a real difference."


    Rather than immediately getting down to working on a new album, the band - also comprised of drummer Inferno, bassist Orion, and guitarist Seth - set out to complete the abandoned touring cycle for Evangelion, hitting the road for the aptly titled Phoenix Rising Tour. Wanting to prove they were stronger than ever the first show was the only time doubts crept into Nergal's mind. "I was a fucking wreck, and I almost didn't make it to the end of the set. The venue was really smoky, and that was stuffing my nose and my lungs, and physically I felt that I couldn't pull it off. I did, but I was close to passing out on stage. I was literally shocked by this, I remember thinking while we were playing shit, what if I can't do this anymore? I'm just a human being after all. Going into the next show I had no sleep because of all the nerves and anxiety, but it was fucking amazing. With every following show I would get stronger and stronger and grow more confident, and aware of the fact that yes, we will do this."


    Having returned to full force the band were ready to once more move forward, and they began work on what would become The Satanist. While many bands might be concerned with how to follow up a record as devastatingly powerful - and successful - as Evangelion Nergal faced no such doubts. "I don't race myself, and I don't need to prove anything to anyone. Evangelion was a very important record to us, and yes, it was very successful too, but in making The Satanist it wasn't a point of beating that. The point was to do what was organic, and make a natural and honest and sincere album, and that's it. Now the record is finished I like to think of it as an album that is just so different that you can't really compare it to our previous works, which is the best outcome I could hope for." One thing is inarguable, and that is the record is the most sonically rich and complex released under the Behemoth name. With layer upon layer of sound it has great sonic density, but there is intricacy to this, and nothing is forced or contrived. "I don't have a kid but I think the process of raising one is comparable: you invest a lot of your energy and effort and wisdom and money and you educate them, but there's never a one hundred percent guarantee he's going to become a lawyer and not a serial killer. It's the same story with the records - we supply the elements but we just don't know how these elements mixed together are going to come out, and I think it's fortunate that we don't have one hundred percent control over it! It makes for something special."


    The title of the record itself is undeniable in its power, and Nergal sees it as capturing the primal wisdom that the band have always tried to maintain. "To me it's not pretentious at all. It's very straight up, very sincere, and a devastating, conquering statement. There's no compromise or bullshit or gimmicks. What I love about it is that it just speaks for itself. On one hand it's a very black and white title: The Satanist is like a fucking nail through the hand of Jesus Christ, period. No more, no less. But then again, as with everything else you put a hundred people together and ask them what the name The Satanist means to them and you're going to hear a hundred different opinions, which they can then discuss and fight over." Likewise, Nergal views the lyrical content of the record as similarly open to interpretation, encouraging this. "There's a lot of symbolism and reflections and impressions in there, and it's using millions of metaphors to express a certain very sinister and very captivating atmosphere, but there are no answers. People always like to have a deeper insight into what we do, but that's not what we want to give with this record. The way I see it is that between us we can make a huge fucking pyre and set the world on fire, but what we're doing is just giving you the matches, giving you the spark, what you want to do with it is up to you. Personally, if I sat down with the lyrics in front of me I too would probably come up with a lot of different interpretations and concepts, it's a never ending process, and that's exciting to me."


    Twenty-three years and ten albums into their career, that Behemoth is still in the ascendant is a statement to their commitment, determination and capacity for writing such powerful music. If ever a band was to go out on a high The Satanist would make for one hell of a swan song, but don't expect them to disappear any time soon. "I remember before we we had a record deal I was having a conversation with Baal, the band's original drummer, and we said okay, if one day we manage to record an album and put it out how cool would it be to split up right after that? It would be one record and no more, and there was something about that that had an appeal, but y'know what, it doesn't work like that for individuals like myself. Hunger has always driven me through life, and I can never sit in one place and relax for too long because I have the need to explore this whole universe in every possible way. Now, over two decades later it's the same story. I can tell you I have no problems with finishing my career after this record. Just say the title itself: The Satanist. How the fuck am I gonna beat that title? It sounds like the ultimate definition of our art - but then again, I remember that conversation with Baal, and I know it doesn't work like that, so I know there will probably be other incarnations of our artistic identity, one way or another. All I know is I love being here and now, and I just want to underline that I couldn't be more proud and happy with my own music. It really drives me through the day, and now I just want to sit back and hear any and all opinions of it."

    1. Blow Your Trumpets Gabriel
    2. Furor Divinus
    3. Messe Noire
    4. Ora Pro Nobis Lucifer
    5. Amen
    6. The Satanist
    7. Ben Sahar
    8. In the Absence ov Light
    9. O Father O Satan O Sun!
    Behemoth
    $44.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Sorceress (Black Vinyl) Sorceress (Black Vinyl) Quick View

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    Sorceress (Black Vinyl)

    Pressed On Black Vinyl


    There are few bands that can or will match Sweden's Opeth. Since forming in the tiny Stockholm suburb of Bandhagen in 1990, the Swedes have eclipsed convention, defiantly crushed the odds, and, most importantly, crafted 12 stunningly beautiful, become one of the best bands on the planet; on album or on stage. Ask any Opeth fan. Enquire with any band that's shared the proverbial pine with the Swedes. Or, get a label representative to talk Opeth. They'll all tell you the same thing: Opeth are peerless. And they're only getting better.


    Opeth's new album, Sorceress, their first for Nuclear Blast via the band's imprint label Moderbolaget Records, is proof chief architect Mikael Åkerfeldt has a near-endless well of greatness inside. From the album's opener "Persephone" to "The Wilde Flowers" and "Strange Brew" to the album's counterpart title tracks "Sorceress" and "Sorceress II", Opeth's twelfth full-length is an unparalleled adventure, where visions cleverly and secretly change, colours mute as if weathered by time, and sounds challenge profoundly. Sorceress is, by definition, moored in Åkerfeldt's impressive record collection-his one true vice-but, as always, there's more invention than appropriation at play.


    "This time around I didn't think about what I wanted to do," Åkerfeldt reveals. "I was forced to write. But once I started, it was easy. This record, like the last record, didn't take long to write. Like five or six months. The thoughts behind this record developed as I was writing. The only thing I was thinking about with this record was to write that songs didn't musically connect. I made sure if I had a song that was new sounding for this record, I'd make the next song completely different. I think the songs are very different from one another. It's very diverse."


    Certainly, every Opeth record has had diversity. In 1995, Orchid reset the rules of death metal. Six years later, Blackwater Park hit the high note for musicality in a genre generally devoid of it. Damnation, in 2003, was the work of a band determined to upend the norm. Five years after that, Watershed closed Opeth's chapter on death metal by visiting its darkest corners and holding its native brutality aloft. And in 2014, Pale Communion officially bridged the progressive music gap by twisting the intrepid sounds of '60s, '70s, and '80s into contemporary brilliance. So, really, what's so different about Sorceress?


    "My music taste got a little wider," grins Åkerfeldt. "I started listening to jazz. I bought a lot of Coltrane records. I never really thought Coltrane would be for me because I like 'dinner jazz.' I like comfortable, soft, nice, and lovely jazz. Like Miles Davis' '50s stuff. Porgy and Bess, for example. I guess Dave Brubeck fits in there, too. So, that's the only new influx of musical inspiration for me. Other than that, I've been buying the same type of records I always have. Prog, symphonic rock, singer/songwriter, metal, hard rock But there wasn't anything that set me off like The Zombies or Scott Walker. Nothing got me going this time."


    Actually, that's not entirely true. Åkerfeldt's always mining for progressive gold. Good, rare music is particularly good at getting his motor running. He found double-gold in one-off Italian outfit Il Paese dei Balocchi and Bobak, Jons, Malone's ultra-obscure Motherlight album. To wit, get Åkerfeldt talking about either and he's all too pleased to discuss the finer points of Il Paese dei Balocchi's string-based darkness or how he fan-boyed Malone via email to get the famed British orchestrator and one-time Iron Maiden producer to contribute to Sorceress.


    "I absolutely love Il Paese dei Balocchi," Åkerfeldt professes. "They did one album. It's insanely good. It has everything I love about progressive rock in it. This album is so orchestrated and epic. It's got lots of string sections. It's very moody, dark, and sad. It's a mystery they didn't do any more. As for Will Malone, he did the strings and stuff for the Sabbath records-Sabotage and Never Say Die! But now he does strings for pop artists like Joss Stone, The Verve, Depeche Mode. I looked him up, mostly because he was the house engineer for Morgan Studios in the '60s. He was also in a few bands. Like Orange Bicycle and played on the Motherlight album. He also had a solo record, which is also amazing and superbly rare. It's orchestral. The bulk of it is strings. It's kind of like Nick Drake."


    Åkerfeldt's quick to point out, however, his newfound progressive music loves didn't directly inspire him to write Sorceress. The majority of the album was penned in Opeth's rehearsal space, where, nestled comfortably in a corner, a computer, a keyboard, and a microphone sit ready for the next Opeth epic. It isn't plush, but it's exactly the type of environment the frontman needs to focus his creative self into song.


    "When I'm in a writing mode, I have tunnel vision," says Åkerfeldt. "I have a really good work ethic. I go down to the studio everyday early in the morning and I work. I absolutely love it. It's so much fun. It's much easier now, too. I write complete demos. I sequence the songs in the order I want them to be on the record. I do mixing. I do overdubs. Once I'm done, I give copies to the guys so they can listen to the album. They practice to it on their own. When it's time to go into the studio, everybody does their own thing. It obviously works."


    For Sorceress, Opeth returned to Rockfield Studios in Wales, where the Swedes had tracked Pale Communion in 2014 with Tom Dalgety. The experience was so positive and historical-the countryside studio was also home to pivotal Budgie, Queen, Rush, Judas Priest, and Mike Oldfield recordings-there really was no other option for Opeth and crew. Rockfield Studios or bust! The studio, with Dalgety yet again in tow, provided the necessary isolation, the right bucolic atmosphere, the best gear, and three square meals a day for Sorceress to come out the other end spitting fire. All in 12 bittersweet days, too.


    "There was a time when I came out of our recordings a wreck," Åkerfeldt bemoans. "But now I come out with a wish. I wish it wouldn't have gone so quickly. There's emptiness after I leave the studio. I love writing and recording in the studio. It's lovely at Rockfield. It's in the sticks. It's got horses and cows. There's lots of sheep in Wales. But the studio is just a studio. It's so beautiful there. So quiet. It's a residential studio as well, so we live there while we're recording. We have chefs for us, too. So, we can just be there, playing, recording, and hanging out."


    If life is like a Peter Max poster, the lyrics to Sorceress aren't. There's color, but they've been treated, corrupted, and befouled. That is to say, they're much darker. Some of bleak lyrical tones stem from Åkerfeldt's personal life-and are thusly contorted beyond recognition-while others touch grimly on topics like love and what happens to people on the other side of it. In fact, some of the lyrical ideas are similar to what was happening on Blackwater Park.


    "I made sure to write good lyrics," Åkerfeldt laughs. "This sounds very old-fashioned black metal to say, but the lyrics are misanthropic. It's not a concept record, so there's no theme running through the record. Most of the record deals with love. The negative aspects of love. The jealously, the bitterness, the paranoia, and the mind games of love. So, it's a love record. Love songs. Love can be like a disease or a spell."


    Luckily, for Åkerfeldt and crew-bassist Martín MÉndez, drummer Martin Axenrot, guitarist Fredrik Åkesson, and keyboardist Joakim Svalberg-the lineup doesn't have to deal with Sorceress' main theme. They've been together since Heritage was completed, and according to Åkerfeldt he's not been in a better band situation before. Not since Orchid. Not since Still Life. Not since Ghost Reveries.


    "It's the best band situation I've ever had. Fans will look at our eras and have their favorite lineup, but this is the best. Even the happiest days of the first and second lineups aren't comparable to what I have now. We never fight. It's like a good work team. We know each other professionally and personally. As much as we're a band, we're also friends. We hang out when we're not doing Opeth."


    A core team is a good thing, when Opeth's credibility is in full view of fans and critics. Åkerfeldt's very aware of what the masses have had to say about Opeth since Watershed. While some disliked the musical shift on Heritage, most have applauded it. They've come to expect something new from Opeth. True to form, Sorceress will give long-time fans and weary critics reason to re-think Opeth and what it takes to be musically fearless.


    "I hope they'll like the record," posits Åkerfeldt. "I can only talk from my perspective and taste here, but we offer diversity that's not really present in the scene today. Whatever genre. We've always been a special band. We've gotten a lot of shit for being different. We still do. Our time will come, I think. It comes down to perseverance. It comes down to not giving up or giving in to public opinion. Music is about doing your own thing or going your own way."

    1. Persephone
    2. Sorceress
    3. The Wilde Flowers
    4. Will O The Wisp
    5. Chrysalis
    6. Sorceress 2
    7. The Seventh Sojourn
    8. Strange Brew
    9. A Fleeting Glance
    10. Era
    11. Persephone (Slight Return)
    12. The Ward
    13. Spring MCMLXXIV
    Opeth
    $29.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Europe '72 Vol. 2 (Awaiting Repress) Europe '72 Vol. 2 (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $69.99
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    Europe '72 Vol. 2 (Awaiting Repress)

    This exclusive Record Store Day vinyl version of Europe 72 Vol. 2. LP includes a bonus track not found on the CD version; Big Railroad Blues recorded at the Tivoli Concert Hall in Copenhagen (4/17/72).


    Europe '72, a triple live album documenting its historic trek across Europe became not only one of the band's best-selling releases, but also set the gold standard for live Dead. Now the group proves you can never get too much of a good thing when it revisits that legendary collection with Europe '71 Vol. 2, an essential continuation of the original that includes more than two hours of unreleased performances from that storied tour.


    Grateful Dead archivist David Lemieux, who produced this 20-track compilation, says he only chose song titles that did not appear on Europe '72 as a way to complement the original. I think this album, coupled with Europe '72, represents a complete overview of the tour in every way, he says. In fact, songs like Beat It On Down The Line, Next Time You See Me and Sing Me Back Home were selected by the Grateful Dead for the first set, but were left off because there wasn't enough room.


    In a nod to the original, Vol. 2 features new cover art by Stanley Mouse, the artist who helped create the iconic artwork from Europe '72, which features the return of the legendary Ice Cream Kid. Trouble comes in many flavors. Ice Cream Kid is in hot water. The jury is out. His only defense is love, says Mouse of the Kid's return.


    Recorded at various locations during the band's 22-show tour, the collection captures the Dead in white-hot moments of improvisational revelry as the band explores a number of its most enduring songs, like Bertha, Sugaree and Playing In the Band, plus relatively obscure cuts like Black-Throated Wind and Pigpen's Chinatown Shuffle.


    As a special treat, the set includes an epic hour-plus jam that combines Dark Star and The Other One. Recorded at the Bickershaw Festival, it was the only show on this tour where the band broke out both of these beloved improvisational showpieces. Vol. 2 also includes Good Lovin and Dire Wolf from the April 26 show at Jahrhundert Halle in Frankfurt, West Germany. While much of that concert was released on 1995's Hundred Year Hall, these particular tracks were not included and have remained unreleased until now.

    LP1
    Side 1
    1. Bertha (Tivoli Concert Hall, Copenhagen, Denmark 4/14/1972)
    2. Me And My Uncle (Wembley Empire Pool, London, England 4/7/72)
    3. Chinatown Shuffle (Tivoli Concert Hall, Copenhagen, Denmark 4/14/1972)
    4. Sugaree (Olympia Theatre, Paris, France 5/3/72)


    Side 2
    1. Black-Throated Wind (Tivoli Concert Hall, Copenhagen, Denmark 4/14/1972)
    2. Loser (Tivoli Concert Hall, Copenhagen, Denmark 4/14/1972)
    3. Next Time You See Me (Olympia Theatre, Paris, France 5/4/72)


    LP2
    Side 1
    1. Beat It On Down The Line (La Grande Salle Du Grand Theatre De Luxembourg, Luxembourg 5/16/72)
    2. Dire Wolf (Jahnrhundert Halle, Frankfurt, West Germany 4/26/72)
    3. Good Lovin (Jahnrhundert Halle, Frankfurt, West Germany 4/26/72)


    Side 2
    1. Greatest Story Ever Told (Olympia Theatre, Paris, France 5/3/72)
    2. Deal (Olympia Theatre, Paris, France 5/4/72)
    3. Playing In The Band (Lyceum Theatre, London, England 5/24/72)


    LP3
    Side 1
    1. Dark Star (Bickershaw Festival, Wigan, England 5/7/72)
    2. Drums (Bickershaw Festival, Wigan, England 5/7/72)


    Side 2
    1. The Other One (Bickershaw Festival, Wigan, England 5/7/72) [Part 1]


    LP4
    Side 1
    1. The Other One (Bickershaw Festival, Wigan, England 5/7/72) [Part 2]
    2. Sing Me Back Home (Lyceum Theatre, London, England 5/26/72)


    Side 2
    1. Big Railroad Blues (Tivoli Concert Hall, Copenhagen, Denmark 4/17/1972)
    2. Not Fade Away (Wembley Empire Pool, London, England 4/7/72)
    3. Not Fade Away (Wembley Empire Pool, London, England 4/7/72)

    Grateful Dead
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 4 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Rest In Chaos Rest In Chaos Quick View

    $25.99
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    Rest In Chaos

    Let me explain what it's like to summarize Rest in Chaos. What you have here is, in the first place, the book of Genesis as deftly reconceived by Todd Snider who has been inhabited by a spirit resembling Philip K. Dick. The rest of the Hard Working Americans are under the direction (or perhaps in the thrall) of an older wiser Jimi Hendrix and a Frank Zappa no less exacting than he was when he departed. It is rock'n'roll music, past, present and future, and that's no dream, it's just a fact. There are moments here when the walls of Babel might be falling, there are moments when they are reinvented and every time you try to pin it down, it shows you something else. "Half Ass Moses," the third song, ends by declaring "The song wasn't all that complicated."


    Like hell it isn't. When, in the very next song, "Dope is Dope," Todd Snider is a voice more inflammatory and gritty than I have ever heard from him before, "His mother didn't understand him / Whose mother ever does?" am I supposed to laugh, cry, applaud or beg for mercy. All that's really sure is, you're not leaving 'til the show's over. Even if you want to. There's nowhere else to go, and even if there were, the music's too good.


    So much for metaphysics. The actual physics of the thing is seven billion people out for what they only think is a stroll, armed with nothing more than some quite treacherous Roman candles Rest in Chaos might, if these Hard Working Americans were scientists of something other than sound, be the story of the entropy of the universe, and if you think I'm kidding that's only because you haven't taken the deep dive into its complexity, which if not quantum is at least a quandary. Albums aren't this good anymore; they're not this ambitious; their parts are not so finely conceived, the risks they take are not so reckless, the ways they resolve contradictions are not so elegant. Most of all they don't kick you in the preconceptions anywhere near so often. (How did they manage to create harmonies in "Something Else" that recall both the Hollies and the Mothers of Invention?)


    Todd's songs sound like he swiped part of them from Billy Joe Shaver and part from Tim Buckley and welded them together with spare parts from Iggy and Paul McCartney. There's a nightmare embedded here, and what cares the weight of it, the aspect of doom and the hint of doom is Dave Schools' bass. Neal Casal, who might be the most under-rated guitarist in rock, is constantly making the chaos more beautiful than you'd think possible. The roots of the sound are in the jam bands and Americana groups and singer-songwriter sessions the band members have played in but when they get to "Throwing Goats" (OK, maybe I should have said Thomas Pynchon or John Barth rather than Dick) and "Something Else" (both parts), they've joined the ranks of the rockers who no longer look for interstellar overdrive, because they've already found it.


    All this is, of course, metaphor. Well, most of it. Some of it. The part about how strong it is, how smart, how completely the product of the past ("stand up for your brother, stick it to the man") and how anticipatory of one of the best futures anyone has shown us is straight up. It's one of the most well-sustained albums I've heard in years, and what it sustains is not only my faith in rock'n'roll or even how hard the Hard Working Americans really do work to make their magic, but how much it means to them, which is the only way it can mean very much to the rest of us.


    Let me put it this way: I've heard Rest in Chaos any number of times and there's no way I'm done with it. I can tell you about its surface but I haven't gotten to the bottom of it. I'm not really sure there is one. It is humbling to confront it, and reassuring to know that there is all the rest of our lives for that. "The High Price of Inspiration"? A bargain.

    1. Opening Statement
    2. It Runs Together
    3. Half Ass Moses
    4. Dope Is Dope
    5. Burn Out Shoes
    6. Roman Candles
    7. Ascending Into Madness
    8. Throwing The Goats
    9. Something Else
    10. Massacre
    11. The High Price of Inspiration
    12. Acid
    13. Purple Mountain Jamboree
    Hard Working Americans
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Charlie Watts Meets The Danish Radio Big Band Charlie Watts Meets The Danish Radio Big Band Quick View

    $25.99
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    Charlie Watts Meets The Danish Radio Big Band

    Before Charlie Watts became the best-known drummer on the planet with The Greatest rock 'n' Roll Band in the World he lived for a few months in Denmark. According to English trumpeter and flugelhorn player, Gerard Presencer, who is also a member of the Danish Radio Big Band, it was something he only found out about by chance when he and Charlie talked on the telephone in 2009


    "I landed a job with Danish Radio Big Band in 2009. A week or two after arriving in Copenhagen I got a call from Charlie. Later the idea dawned upon me for a return to his Jazz days over here after nearly 50 years. I spoke with my boss at the Danish Radio Big Band and went about putting this live project together. We agreed upon a week in Copenhagen in October 2010."


    They rehearsed for 4 days, then played a concert on the fifth day at the newly opened Danish Radio Concert Hall in Copenhagen. This concert was recorded for broadcast by Danish National Radio. Charlie and his long-time bassist Dave Green went to record shops and strolled around the city, with no need for security guards. Charlie made it clear that he did not want to be placed on a big riser above the band, as he found that this did not help the musicians to bond.


    In choosing the material, it was important to focus on the groove. According to Prescencer, "Having Dave Green on bass as special guest was an essential ingredient, as these two boyhood friends (next door neighbours growing up in Wembley, North London) have unspoken psychic connections that bassists and drummers, so there are times on this recording where their abundant empathy makes the rest of the band comfortable enough to really play out and take chances."


    The album includes seven tracks, including two Mick and Keith compositions, 'Paint it Black' and 'You Can't Always Get What You Want', both arranged by Prescencer and another one, 'Faction' that is based on another Stones' classic. There are also two by Charlie himself, both written with fellow drummer Jim Keltner.


    A day or two after the broadcast Prescencer began to think that the concert was so good it deserved to be heard more widely. "The Danish Radio needed very little convincing to hand over the recordings to me to work on, as well as Søren Frost our regular drummer and rhythm section consultant from the big band and the brilliant recording engineer, Lars C. Bruun. So, after several years work on this, we have produced this collection of music from our gig."


    Charlie Watts meets the Danish Radio Big Band is the kind of album that many jazz fans had probably given up hope of hearing. In the glory days of big band jazz and arrangers like Oliver Nelson coming up with brilliant music, albums like this were, if not commonplace, at least more readily available. The truth is there is nothing commonplace about this album, it is a sheer delight.


    Anyone who knows Charlie, knows how much he loves jazz. A few years ago when he and I were looking at a photo of the Stones playing in the 1960s he pointed at a particular cymbal and said, "I've still got that cymbal, but I don't use it on Stones' gigs, it's too good for them. I just use it on my jazz gigs." There's no doubt, that's the cymbal you hear on the first part of the 'Elvin Suite'.


    Charlie Watts is one of the great ambassadors for jazz and every jazz lover will relish this record, and the fact that Charlie is involved may bring jazz to the attention of some that are not sure if they like jazz. Listen to this and you know you do.

    1. Elvin Suite - Part 1
    2. Elvin Suite - Part 2
    3. Faction (AKA Satisfaction)
    4. I Should Care
    5. You Can't Always Get What You Want
    6. Paint It Black
    7. Molasses
    Charlie Watts & The Danish Radio Big Band
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Crooked Teeth Crooked Teeth Quick View

    $19.99
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    Crooked Teeth

    Papa Roach has never taken the easy way out and they aren't going to start now. Over the past two decades the group have established themselves as true trendsetters in heavy music: They've been nominated for two Grammys, toured the globe with everyone from Eminem to Marilyn Manson and crafted the nÜ metal anthem "Last Resort," which is still in heavy rotation on rock radio seventeen years after its release. However, the group's tenth full-length Crooked Teeth sees the band returning to their humble-and hungry-roots. The album was recorded in a cramped West Hollywood studio with up-and-coming producers Nicholas "RAS" Furlong and Colin Brittain, who grew up listening to Papa Roach and inspired them to revisit some of the traits that personally endeared the band to them, most notably frontman Jacoby Shaddix's remarkable rapping technique.


    "We've always kind of considered ourselves to be the bastard cousins of everything we've every been involved with so we wanted to be true to that and switch things up this time around," Shaddix says. "The first time we met up with RAS and Colin, they said that [2000's] Infest was on constant rotation when they were growing up and they wanted to bring back some of that fire." The connection between the artists and producers was immediate and the first song Papa Roach-which also features guitarist Jerry Horton, bassist Tobin Esperance, and drummer Tony Palermo-came up with for Crooked Teeth was "My Medication," an instantly catchy banger that sees Shaddix spitting verses in between massive choruses and ambient accents. "I really felt like we had a personal connection and the music was just there waiting to be written and once we nailed that song things really clicked and we knew exactly what we had to do" Furlong explains. "We really followed our instincts and tried something unproven with this record and because of that we ended up with a bold, courageous and more adventurous version of Papa Roach." It was in this studio that "old school" Papa Roach ways, morphed to create this "new school" Papa Roach sound.


    From the instantly infectious nature of the title track to the atmospheric sheen of the ballad "Periscope" (which features Skylar Grey) and the hip-hop rock mashup "Sunrise Trailer Park" (which features an impassioned verse from Machine Gun Kelly). Crooked Teeth displays the various sides of Papa Roach and illustrates why they've managed to remain relevant while musical trends ebb and flow. "We didn't go into this album with the intention of trying to write radio singles," Horton explains. "The collection of songs was really about bookending everything that we've done prior to this album and reintroducing Papa Roach to people who didn't realize the depth that we have," says Palermo. "The whole idea was to take the classic elements of Papa Roach that everyone loved and revamp them into a modern version of the sound through the creative process," adds Furlong. "We just wanted to flip everything on its head and see what would happen and it turned out more amazing than any of us could have expected."


    "The people who have wanted to hear me rap for years are gonna love some of the viscousness on this record," Shaddix explains adding that while he had his own initial reservations about some of the album's more unorthodox moments - such as the 808 bass drop into a metal breakdown on the album title track, "Crooked Teeth" - ultimately those adventurous decisions are what make the album such a refreshing change of pace in a rock climate that's grown increasingly sterile. "I'd like to personally thank all of the guys in the band for making this happen because all it takes is one person to give you a shot and this was definitely mine," Furlong adds. "I want to be one of the best producers in modern day music so I wanted to work as hard for these guys as they would for themselves because as a producer it was my job to push them to get the kind of quality work everyone has been expecting."


    Just as Papa Roach felt like they still had something to prove with this record, so did the production team who attempted to bring in elements of music from different genres and parts of the world while still staying true to Papa Roach's sound. "One of the big elements in my production is finding those pockets of rhythm that people associate more with rap or reggae," Furlong explains, a fact that came in especially handy when Shaddix was fine-tuning his freestyle skills. "I know rap rhythms because I grew up listening to hip-hop, so I was able to make sure that the delivery was on point and the beat was in the pocket so it didn't suffer from a lot of the stylistic pitfalls that can happen when you merge rock and rap."


    Crooked Teeth also sees Shaddix pulling no punches lyrically, as evidenced on intensely personal tracks like "Born For Greatness," produced by Jason Evigan (Jason Derulo, Demi Lovato, Kehlani, Madonna), which sees Shaddix getting sentimental about his three children, or "American Dream" where the lifelong pacifist begs the listener to ask, "have you ever thought war was a sickness?" "My father is a Vietnam veteran and a lot of those soldiers came back to a country where people weren't accepting them back into society or aware of the effects that war has on your psyche," Shaddix says of the song." "Post-traumatic stress disorder and the disintegration of the American family are things I've dealt with personally and I knew other people could relate to. I think that's what makes this record bold. Nothing was off limits when it came to what was on my mind."


    Never one to shy away from difficult topics, Papa Roach dug deep with Crooked Teeth and refused to censor themselves when it came to their opinion of the current political landscape and organized religion. For example, on "None Of The Above," every ounce of musical intensity on the album is mirrored by Shaddix's words whether he's screaming, singing or rhyming. "It took me a long time, but eventually I realized that in life we're all human and we all make mistakes whether you're the president or the preacher, you know?" Shaddix explains when asked about the latter song. "It's an example of how I can get lost in a storyline and explore so many different issues in one track and that's what I love about this record. Just the spark of an idea would instantly ignite and the next thing we knew we had another song that we all loved."


    In many ways making Crooked Teeth reminded Shaddix of the band's early days, well before they sold millions of albums and became a household name. "When we were in the rehearsal space I wasn't thinking about who I needed to impress, I was thinking about how much I love making music with the guys in this band," Shaddix admits. "It feels honest and it feels pure," adds Esperance. Fittingly, throughout the process, Shaddix gained inspiration from bands like Led Zeppelin and Faith No More, acts who constantly redefined themselves and were never content to rest on the merits of a hit single." This band encompasses some of my greatest victories, but it's also brought out some of my darkest character flaws," Shaddix summarizes, "so I have kind of a love-hate relationship with this music, but I can't stop because I've got too much of my life invested in it at this point. We are a purpose-driven band and I've got a responsibility to myself and our fans to continue to create."

    1. Break The Fall
    2. Crooked Teeth
    3. My Medication
    4. Born For Greatness
    5. American Dreams
    6. Periscope
    7. Help
    8. Sunrise Trailer Park
    9. Traumatic
    10. None Of The Above
    Papa Roach
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Handwritten Handwritten Quick View

    $24.99
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    Handwritten


    Blue Colored Vinyl


    The late Nashville songwriter Harlan Howard famously defined the ingredients of a great song as three chords and the truth. Every songwriter knows three chords, but laying bare the truth? Now that can be an altogether trickier affair. In January of 2012, The Gaslight Anthem piled into their old tour van and headed across the New Jersey state line for a 14 hour road trip to Nashville on their own quest for the truth. Their destination was 2806 Azalea Place, Nashville, Blackbird Studio, where the New Brunswick quartet had booked five weeks recording time with producer Brendan O'Brien (Bruce Springsteen, Pearl Jam, AC/DC). Their mission: to reconnect with rock 'n' roll in its most feral, pure, stripped-raw form.


    Brian Fallon was thirteen years old when he discovered The Clash's self-titled debut album in the racks of Sound Effects Records in Hackettstown, New Jersey: the owner of the store promised the young teenager that the record would change his life. He wasn't wrong. But there was a time, not so very long ago, when The Gaslight's Anthem frontman had grown weary of the sound of electric guitars. After three albums of soulful, impassioned, hearts-on-fire punk rock, Sink Or Swim (2007), The '59 Sound (2008) and American Slang (2010), Fallon needed a change of pace, a change of scenery.


    And so, in January of 2011, together with TGA guitar tech Ian Perkins, he formed The Horrible Crowes, a darkly melancholic side-project inspired by his love of The Afghan Whigs, Tom Waits and PJ Harvey. After the band's acclaimed debut album Elsie dropped in September, Fallon joined fellow punk rock troubadours Chuck Ragan, Dan Andriano (Alkaline Trio) and Dave Hause (The Loved Ones) on the acoustic Revival Tour, airing stripped-down versions of Gaslight Anthem and Horrible Crowes songs to packed rooms across Europe. And then he returned home to New Jersey and Gaslight, re-energized, renewed and ready to make a full-tilt rock 'n' roll record again.


    After six weeks of that there's nothing you want to hear more than a Marshall stack turned all the way up, he says with a laugh. The result is Handwritten, the most committed, affecting and compelling album of The Gaslight Anthem's career to date. Introduced by muscular lead-off single 45, which received it's world premiere on BBC Radio 1 as Zane Lowe's Hottest Record In The World on April 30, it finds the Jersey boys in inspired form, decanting '60's soul, '70's stadium rock, '80s hardcore and '90's grunge into eleven white-knuckle, blue-collar everyman anthems. Fallon likens its incandescent electrical storms to Tom Petty songs (being) played by Pearl Jam. Put more simply, it's a supercharged American rock 'n' roll classic.


    We've taken everything we do and gone to 10 with it, explains Fallon. This is definitely the Gaslight Anthem record I would want next, if I were a fan. American Slang was cool, but this sounds like a band who has plugged back into the electric socket again. I think these songs are the closest thing to what we should have always sounded like, adds guitarist Alex Rosamilia. We just hadn't figured out yet how to play it right.


    Fallon credits Brendan O'Brien for capturing the raw, live-off-the-floor feel of Handwritten. Fine-tuned in the living room of the small rental house the band shared in Nashville, its eleven tracks were recorded with the whole band eyeball-to-eyeball in one room at Blackbird, vibing off one another's energy. The electricity in the recordings is tangible. Brendan taught us a ton about songwriting and recording as a band, Fallon notes. The whole experience was amazing. That's the guy that recorded Pearl Jam, that's the guy that recorded Bruce Springsteen, that's the guy that did Rage Against The Machine; and that's the guy you want to say 'It's good', because when he says it's good, that's when it's good.


    The purity of O'Brien's stark, unadorned recording process served to inspire Fallon's approach to the lyrical themes on Handwritten too. Where previous Gaslight Anthem albums evoked deathless images of Americana, all Cadillacs, jukeboxes, Ferris wheels and wistful, romanticized vignettes of star-struck lovers disappearing into the great wide open, Handwritten is rooted in Fallon's own experiences, lending the record a more immediate, emotional edge. Now I am no angel but I got nothing to hide, the singer rasps on the brooding grunge-noir of Too Much Blood. Can you say the same thing for yourself tonight?


    It's supposed to be a letter to whoever is listening, says Fallon. Like, this is what we got beat up by and maybe you did too. There's so many things that I just never wrote about, real personal stuff that I just wasn't ready to talk about yet. Now I think being an adult I have some reflection on it. We wanted to look back on the music that we first found when we were in high school. The truth is, if you're my age, you were listening to Peal Jam and Nirvana and Soundgarden. When that music came out these were guys that we could relate to. They weren't the biggest bands in the world by accident.


    And it's no accident either that with Handwritten, the Gaslight Anthem themselves sound built to take on the world. After years paying their dues in the punk rock underground, their major label debut is assuredly the work of a young band who know their time is now. And their laidback, charismatic frontman is ready. I've always been ready for arenas, Fallon smiles. I've just been waiting for them to catch up to me. I want to play Giant Stadium, I always wanted to be a major label, major league band. If I can be the kid that's on the cover of Time magazine, I'll take it. And I'll buy you a drink while I'm at it.

    1. 45
    2. Handwritten
    3. Here Comes My Man
    4. Mulholland Drive
    5. Keepsake
    6. Too Much Blood
    7. Howl
    8. Biloxi Parish
    9. Desire
    10. Mae
    11. National Anthem
    Gaslight Anthem
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Birds (Pre-Order) Birds (Pre-Order) Quick View

    $19.99
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    Birds (Pre-Order)

    Seth Glier's new album Birds is steeped in conflict and contradictions. There's grief and loss, but also strength and resilience; doubt and dismay, but also a sense of optimism as Glier confronts heavy topics and wrestles them into the daylight.

    Glier (pronounced Gleer) recorded Birds in an airy loft in western Massachusetts outfitted with a grand piano and floor-to-ceiling windows. Birds roost just outside those windows, on the roof of the converted mill building where he lives, and they became his sympathetic audience while Glier made the album. I felt a tremendous amount of comfort talking to the Birds, he says I'd check in with them regularly to see how they thought things were going so far.

    Birds is Glier's fifth album, and the latest entry in a burgeoning career that has included a Grammy nomination and a pair of Independent Music Awards while touring with artists including Ani DiFranco and Ryan Adams.

    The songs on Birds range from personal to political, and are bound together by the awareness that our world is a fragile place that is all the more magical for it. Glier makes that point on a large scale with Water on Fire, a terse, grinding tune that opens with a cynical reworking of a Ray Charles lyric as Glier uses fracking to dig into the false equivalence between freedom and capitalism. Hasn't Hit Me Yet has a more visceral, intimate approach: the soulful slow jam, full of warm guitars and multi-tracked vocals, is about the death of Glier's autistic brother.

    Together, those songs represent the opposite poles of Birds. I was really trying to explore connections on this record, Glier says. Among those connections is the one between race and the criminal justice system on Justice for All, a raw chain-gang stomp that sounds almost like an old field recording. Like I Do takes a more oblique tack, drawing out feelings of anger through the use of noisy synthesizers and fuzzed-out bass pads.

    The songs on Birds reflect a scope of sound and style: the title track is lush and & orchestral, for example, while Too Much Water pairs Glier's voice and piano with subtle accompaniment from horns, for a classic, elegant feel that calls to mind Harry Nilsson in the early '70s. People Like Us is jaunty and up-tempo, while the trebly guitar arpeggios and moaning saxophone on Just Because I Can sound like a sock-hop slow dance, until you zero in on lyrics delivered by a narrator who dynamites his domestic bliss simply for the power trip. Conflict. Contradiction.

    Even the cover tune, a reimagined version of Buffalo Springfield's For What It's Worth, evokes urgency. Although it was written 50 years ago, it's still about what's happening right now, Glier says.

    Birds began taking shape after Glier lost his brother, Jamie, who died in October 2015, and inspired a TED Talk performance that Glier gave in 2016. My brother passing away was a huge component of where I was and what I was looking for, Glier says. In particular, I was looking for meanings, wanting his life to mean more than just being over.

    For a long time afterward, Glier passed the time by writing songs and inspecting each melody with the feathered fellows by his windowsill. Instead of recording the album in a Los Angeles studio, as he did on his 2015 album If I Could Change One Thing, he decided to make Birds at home.

    I thought that I should just stay close to the windows here, Glier says. I think this sort of happened by accident, but by the time I started recording the record, it was fall in New England, which is a profoundly beautiful death. The air is full of honesty, the sky is full of geese, and there is bright gorgeousness woven into the dying of things. It all seeped into the textures of this record.

    1. Sunshine
    2. Water On Fire
    3. Birds
    4. Just Because I Can
    5. People Like Us
    6. Like I Do
    7. For What It's Worth
    8. Too Much Water
    9. Justice For All
    10. Hasn't Hit Me Yet
    11. I'm Still Looking
    Seth Glier
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed PRE-ORDER Buy Now
  • Meetle Mice Meetle Mice Quick View

    $16.99
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    Meetle Mice

    The music contained on these albums I wrote while in college (and a few while in high school) when I was just discovering computer music. I wrote them for fun, never planning on doing anything with them at the time or expecting them to be heard outside of my circle of friends. When I was asked to play a show on campus I thought it might be a good idea to burn some CD-Rs and try to sell them at the show.


    Going through my files, I found the pieces that I liked the most, grouped them into two different collections and gave them the most appropriate/absurd titles I could think of. Many of the song titles are absurd or toy with the idea of what is offensive and what is not, many of them created as a commentary on the super politically correct atmosphere that was Purchase College in the early 2000s.


    The organization of the songs was somewhat thought out but mostly chaotic: make sure the granular synth pieces are far from each other; keep the songs with beats spread out; sound collages placed amongst sine wave drone pieces. They were more like compilations of my experiments than albums of compositions.


    I made only 8 CD-R copies of each in photocopied sleeves with contact paper on the discs. I sold all but 1 of each for $7 or two for $10. Explosions were going off in my head, dollar signs appearing in my eyes. Making $70 from selling CD-Rs was blowing my mind. I started selling them at every show, even though the music contained on them didnt represent what I ever performed live, since the music on Meetle Mice and Silly Hat was never meant to be performed live (except for the acoustic ensemble pieces).


    The CD-Rs and artwork are riddled with mistakes. Theres digital clipping on many of the tracks; Silly Hat vs. Egale Hat was meant to be Silly Hat vs. Eagle Hat; copy write should have been copyright, etc., but I thought the typos were funny and kept it with each batch of the CD-Rs. Since I was only selling them on campus or a few shows in NYC it didnt really matter. I hated stuff that took itself too seriously so keeping my spelling mistakes glaring was important to me. And considering the music was made in a vacuum with no intention of it ever seeing the light of day, it made sense to keep all the errors in their original state (true of this reissue as well (the artwork was scanned from the original run of 8)).


    I was a very different musician back then trying to figure out how to interact with sound, what could be done with it, where it could go, learning music software for the first time, and discovering many more genres of experimental music than what I was exposed to in my youth on Long Island. It was an exciting time! Since then my aesthetic has shifted, my absurdist mindset subdued and Ive been exposed to a global audience. At times I feel like these albums are skeletons in my musical closet, knowing how easily parts of them could be taken out of context by a media that loves to take things out of context. But these records were made without knowledge of that media world. Theres an innocent ignorance to them that none of my other records will ever be able to have, an ignorance lost to experience.


    These albums are like seeds. They sound, look and feel very different from the fruit that theyve grown but they are still of the same tree. I hope you enjoy listening to them as much as I enjoyed making them. - Dan Deacon

    1. BJI Aii Hmhp #14
    2. Never Do That (Mars)
    3. Biggle Hat Was Ice Cream Time (Card Shark Nose Nose)
    4. 30 (from 21 through 35)
    5. Electronics With Clarinet and Bari Sax
    6. Song For Dina
    7. My own face is F word
    8. Drinking Out of Cups
    9. sdahgsfdgh3frgha3wffhjdvbjs4uh
    10. The Adventures of Mr Bumbershine
    11. Thats A Nice Shirt (Dad)
    12. Aerosmith Permanent Vacation 24162-2
    13. Plums
    14. Im So Gay with The Boner
    15. Aw Ah Ah Ah (Party Cakes)
    16. My Weasle Is Married Worm Married
    17. I Have AIDS
    18. 005 September 22 BE
    Dan Deacon
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Silly Hat Vs. Egale Hat Silly Hat Vs. Egale Hat Quick View

    $16.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Silly Hat Vs. Egale Hat

    The music contained on these albums I wrote while in college (and a few while in high school) when I was just discovering computer music. I wrote them for fun, never planning on doing anything with them at the time or expecting them to be heard outside of my circle of friends. When I was asked to play a show on campus I thought it might be a good idea to burn some CD-Rs and try to sell them at the show.


    Going through my files, I found the pieces that I liked the most, grouped them into two different collections and gave them the most appropriate/absurd titles I could think of. Many of the song titles are absurd or toy with the idea of what is offensive and what is not, many of them created as a commentary on the super politically correct atmosphere that was Purchase College in the early 2000s.


    The organization of the songs was somewhat thought out but mostly chaotic: make sure the granular synth pieces are far from each other; keep the songs with beats spread out; sound collages placed amongst sine wave drone pieces. They were more like compilations of my experiments than albums of compositions.


    I made only 8 CD-R copies of each in photocopied sleeves with contact paper on the discs. I sold all but 1 of each for $7 or two for $10. Explosions were going off in my head, dollar signs appearing in my eyes. Making $70 from selling CD-Rs was blowing my mind. I started selling them at every show, even though the music contained on them didnt represent what I ever performed live, since the music on Meetle Mice and Silly Hat was never meant to be performed live (except for the acoustic ensemble pieces).


    The CD-Rs and artwork are riddled with mistakes. Theres digital clipping on many of the tracks; Silly Hat vs. Egale Hat was meant to be Silly Hat vs. Eagle Hat; copy write should have been copyright, etc., but I thought the typos were funny and kept it with each batch of the CD-Rs. Since I was only selling them on campus or a few shows in NYC it didnt really matter. I hated stuff that took itself too seriously so keeping my spelling mistakes glaring was important to me. And considering the music was made in a vacuum with no intention of it ever seeing the light of day, it made sense to keep all the errors in their original state (true of this reissue as well (the artwork was scanned from the original run of 8)).


    I was a very different musician back then trying to figure out how to interact with sound, what could be done with it, where it could go, learning music software for the first time, and discovering many more genres of experimental music than what I was exposed to in my youth on Long Island. It was an exciting time! Since then my aesthetic has shifted, my absurdist mindset subdued and Ive been exposed to a global audience. At times I feel like these albums are skeletons in my musical closet, knowing how easily parts of them could be taken out of context by a media that loves to take things out of context. But these records were made without knowledge of that media world. Theres an innocent ignorance to them that none of my other records will ever be able to have, an ignorance lost to experience.


    These albums are like seeds. They sound, look and feel very different from the fruit that theyve grown but they are still of the same tree. I hope you enjoy listening to them as much as I enjoyed making them. - Dan Deacon

    1. My Name Is Robert
    2. ksjfhgljkhertykjlehgskjhkjvhda
    3. Sound Events (Live)
    4. Shit Slowly Applied On Cock Parts
    5. The House I Was Isn't My Girlfriends Porshe
    6. Missy Modle x 1000
    7. Spring
    8. I Will Always Have Juice Today
    9. Glass and Metal
    10. It's Not As It's Going Downtown
    11. Junior High Band With Trucks and Dogs
    12. 4400440044040 with Dufus and The Beatles
    Dan Deacon
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Yuck (Deluxe) Yuck (Deluxe) Quick View

    $19.99
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    Yuck (Deluxe)

    Yuck's self-produced self-titled debut showcases a band capable of sprinting off in pretty much any direction you can think of, so diverse and fully realized is its vision. It also shows that their previous releases were merely skimming the tip of the iceberg in terms of what the quartet of Daniel Blumberg, Max Bloom, Mariko Doi and Jonny Rogoff are capable of. This is a confident, wildly ambitious record, but also one which brims over with a ragged warmth and tenderness, tipping its hat at alt music heroes past such as East River Pipe, Dinosaur Jr and Sparklehorse while at the same time retaining a unique identity entirely its own.


    From the rousing call to arms of the opener Get Away, to the hypnotic sturm und drang of Rubber, and the grungy serotonin rush of Operation, it is clear that this is a band in full control of their powers when it comes to anthemic and offbeat guitar rock. But they also reveal an achingly fragile side too, as with the gorgeous, heartsick croon on Suck or on Sunday where Blumberg asks, Did you take the rhythm from me? Yesterday I had it all over chiming, jangling guitars.

    1. Get Away
    2. The Wall
    3. Shook Down
    4. Holing Out
    5. Suicide Policeman
    6. Georgia
    7. Suck
    8. Stutter
    9. Operation
    10. Sunday
    11. Rose Gives A Lilly
    12. Rubber


    Bonus LP
    1. The Base Of A Dream Is Empty
    2. Milkshake
    3. Coconut Bible
    4. Cousin Corona
    5. Doctors In My Bed
    6. Soothe Me

    Yuck
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP + Bonus 12 - Sealed Buy Now
  • Conversations Conversations Quick View

    $18.99
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    Conversations

    Woman's Hour are not your average band. The first clue comes in the name of the London-based swoon-pop four-piece, taken from a beloved female-focussed news and culture show on BBC Radio 4. The second is in their graphic, striking monochrome visuals, meticulously curated in collaboration with TATE and MOMA certified fine artists Oliver Chanarin and Adam Broomberg. These play with shape and texture, much like their powerful, iridescent music. On their excellent debut album 'Conversations', this has the intricate construction and intimacy of The xx and the iridescent shimmer of summer-defining indie pop. Pay attention now, or regret it later.


    In a sense, we feel like the odd ones out, explains frontwoman Fiona Burgess of their nose-to-tail approach to their visuals, performance and songcraft. It's quite empowering that we're doing it as four people but we're not part of a bigger collective. Indeed, their 360º approach is closer to the art/music crossover of acts such as Throbbing Gristle, Yoko Ono or Factory Floor than most of this year's indie hopes. Their music - as poignantly personal as pop gets - has a rare singularity and purpose.


    Take single Her Ghost, which layers a breezy guitar hook with Fiona's beautiful, sighing lyric of inner turmoil. I'm interested in the idea of memory and how powerful memories can be, and how powerful some things can be to let go of, she says. A lot of my writing is me trying to understand an emotion or situation. The track's melody and a message lingers in the recesses of the mind like a box of treasured letters.


    Woman's Hour started to come together one summer, when Fiona started collaborating with her brother, guitarist William Burgess. I had been to a couple of rehearsals with other bands and it wasn't very much fun, says William. I mentioned to Fiona that I'd like her to sing and we decided to have a go. I went round to her place one day and it turned our that she had a pretty nice voice! The two recruited bassist Nicolas Graves, who was William's friend from back home (the pair had played in a couple of local guitar bands back in Kendal) and the three began creating their music. Nicolas explains: We just messed around in each other's houses for a bit and tried to get a few songs together.


    We played our first gig in 2011, Nicolas continues. It was at Fiona's house in Camden. It was a hat-themed party. I remember wearing a beret. Fiona was wearing a trilby, and Will had a sombrero on. It was incredibly nerve-racking for the trio despite the jolly occasion (I almost froze with fear at one point laughs Nicolas), but the gig was a runaway success, and it was there that they all met keyboardist Josh Hunnisett, who was already a friend of Fiona's and happened to be doing the sound at the event. Even in the shambolic situation, the band were meticulous perfectionists.


    The quartet had their first rehearsal in an old vicarage in Dalston. It just felt really honest, says Josh. There was no 'you can't do this, you can't do that, don't try that - the style of music felt pure and everyone was expressing themselves in the way they wanted. We've tried to think about this as a collaboration between four different creative people. Each band member brings a wholly distinct set of influences to the band - from German cold wave to pop rarities and uncompromising singer/songwriters. Their website even has a section dedicated to recommended reading.


    But it was their favourite radio show that was to be have most prominent effect on the band. When we were first doing demos we named them all after BBC Radio 4 programmes, explains Nick. The World at One, Afternoon Play, that kind of thing. I think Woman's Hour might have been one of them, and when it came to play our first gig (at The Queen's Head in London) one of our friends suggested using it and it stuck. Indeed, their jangle-pop first single Jenni, which is quite different to their current material, was named after Radio 4 stalwart Jenni Murray. The band's first 7, Jenni/ Human, was released through London label Dirty Bingo after the label head tracked them down on online and interviewed them for beloved London zine Loud And Quiet.


    Although the single made a splash, things were moving too fast for the band. Suddenly we thought, 'should we have had something to back this up?, says William. 'We didn't have any more songs, so we took a year and a half off to write and develop the sound. That's also when we met Tom Morris, our producer. The band hibernated, starting from the bottom up. Let's get everything fucking slick, how we want it, let's do everything exactly how we want it ourselves - don't compromise.


    It was worth the wait. When the band put their gorgeously lilting comeback single Our Love Has No Rhythm online in 2013, the blogs exploded, in part due to the glossy monochrome video depicting Fiona's face in close-up, and also the stunning single artwork - an uneasy found image of a suited gentleman falling over. We've been using images that are taken from manuals, explains Fiona. Lots of different 'How To' manuals from How to Train a Chihuahua to How to Fall Over Without Hurting Yourself. We like the idea of how to look after yourself physically paired with the music, which is a lot less direct.


    Perhaps Woman's Hour's music does not hammer its message home, but there's a nuance and craft that's scarcely found in today's industry. They followed Our Love Has No Rhythm, with the cooing, Beach House-esque Darkest Place in which Fiona implores I don't understand why you're not around over swooning keyboards, with a cooing ooooh-ooooh hook. For the track's striking video, she'd is depicted in close crop with her eyes closed as an unknown figure attempts to prise them open. I was finishing a degree in performance studies at the time, and I came across this particular piece by Vito Acconci, she says of the inspiration for the video. The original piece is about 20 minutes long, and it's absolutely gruelling, there's no soundtrack to it and it's a piece where you can hear the sound in the room of two people in a physical struggle. You can hear the heavy breathing, the feet, the occasional sounds of resistance. She endured a restaging of the piece, which she found very intense and intimate.


    Woman's Hour have an uncompromising commitment to the unconventional. For them, music does not exist as merely a hummable soundtrack but as a wider and more artistic proposition. As Fiona continues: A lot of music videos are not very challenging, and I like the idea of them being quite confronting. Our album artwork is inspired by a picture of a woman surrounded by pyramids that was part of a magazine article called The Start of an Era. It was a 1970s performance piece that was performed at the Whitney Museum in New York, and we've also designed nine of these pyramids with Oliver Chanarin that we'll incorporate into our live show when possible. The Start of an Era? We couldn't have said it better ourselves.

    1. Unbroken Sequence
    2. Conversations
    3. To The End
    4. Darkest Place
    5. In Stillness We Remain
    6. Our Love Has No Rhythm
    7. Her Ghost
    8. Two Sides of You
    9. Devotion
    10. Reflections
    11. The Day That Needs Defending
    Woman's Hour
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Lost Time (On Sale) Lost Time (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $17.99 $14.21 Save $3.78 (21%)

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    Lost Time (On Sale)

    It's been 12 years since the initial release of what would be the very last album by the late Minneapolis based
    12 Rods.


    Aptly titled, Lost Time, this last epic perfectly defines and captures how great this band was and how
    truly ahead of their time its members were. Not only that but for its city, a city fueled on such great
    music, both 12 Rods and this record have gone down as one of Minneapolis' finest.


    When musicians that I know gather, sit and talk about the greats, Ryan Olcott always comes up. It's
    very hard to try and calculate how deep Olcott's genius goes, when at the time, it felt as if the music
    12 Rods was making was in fact from the future. There is the 'Pop' music that is defined by paid-toplay
    radio, and the corporate avenues of selling music as a product instead of a
    natural commodity. But then there is the 'Pop' music that seems handed down, majestically, true,
    whole and unifying. There's little music and even fewer complete albums that live up to such 'Pop'
    majesty. Lost Time is one.


    At the time of its release, 12 Rods was in its final form, which included Ryan Olcott and his brilliant
    brother/engineer/producer Ev Olcott, sought after bassist Bill Shaw, and one of the best living
    drummers in the world today, Dave King. Lost Time was 12 Rods fifth studio album but their first
    after being dropped from the deathly heights of mainstream music's claws.


    The band was signed by V2 records in the late '90s and were poised to be the next big 'Rock'
    band. And so when you think back to 2002, the year Lost Time was released, or even two years prior
    when 12 Rods released its fourth studio album, the Todd Rungren-produced, V2-
    botched Separation Anxieties, you must consider the landscape of 'Rock' music. Like, the popular
    bands that were on MTV. Lit was one of those hugely popular rock bands that wrote catchy
    songs about putting hearts in zip-lock bags and had a logo identical to Miller Lite with just the e
    taken off. Though, regardless of aesthetic choices, this goes to show the disparity between what 12
    Rods actually was and what the industry wanted them to be. It's not that they openly defied their
    calling. No, it's just that the music was simply too advanced to be contained in the industries 'Rock
    'n Roll' zip-lock.


    Lost Time is one of my most listened to albums of all time. It's one of the only records I know of that
    is so full of hooks, yet never feels recycled or fake; it's just so fucking enjoyable from stem to
    stern. And now with its first ever vinyl pressing, I hope that this album can be as much a companion
    to you as it has for me. Solo listen, party listen, how can it be both? It just is.


    With this reissue, it means that Lost Time won't be lost at all - that great things always make their way
    through, even if it takes a decade.


    - Justin Vernon

    1. Universal Time
    2. Fake Magic 8-Ball
    3. Twenty Four Hours Ago
    4. One Thing Does Not Belong
    5. Boy In The Woods
    6. Summertime Vertigo
    7. Accidents Waiting To Happen
    8. Terrible Hands
    9. The Time Is Right (To Be Wrong)
    10. Lost/Found
    11. Telephone Holiday
    12 Rods
    $17.99 $14.21 Save $3.78 (21%)
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Like A Rose Like A Rose Quick View

    $15.99
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    Like A Rose

    Ashley Monroe, a member of the critically acclaimed trio Pistol Annies, presents her first Warner Nashville solo album, Like A Rose. Most folks, as soon as they hear Ashley Monroe, instantly recognize one thing: she's the real deal. Her songs resonate so profoundly because they reflect the experiences of an artist who, although she is just 26, has already seen both the best and worst that life has to offer.


    Like a Rose has been a long time coming. Monroe has been creating music for more than half of her life-attracting along the way kudos from such music world giants as Dolly Parton, Guy Clark, Vince Gill and Jack White. Her new, full-length album release serves both to fill in the back-story and impart to us who she is today. At times her songs are dead serious, at others utterly hilarious, but always Monroe is an original with a compelling story to share.


    Monroe spent her childhood in Knoxville, Tennessee, where she immersed herself in all varieties of music ranging from country-she's not-too-distantly related to members of the legendary Carter Family-to rock, pop, rap and even opera. When she was 11, Monroe won a talent contest singing "I Want To Be a Cowboy's Sweetheart" and two years later her father gave Ashley her first guitar. She developed a passion for writing songs, discovering that she could easily communicate her thoughts and sentiments through a six-string and her dynamic, exceptional voice.


    One of the most rewarding artistic adventures for Ashley to date has been the Pistol Annies, a trio she co-formed in 2011 with her friend Miranda Lambert, whose chart-topping hit "Heart Like Mine" Ashley co-penned, and newcomer Angaleena Presley. Pistol Annies have provided Monroe with yet another outlet for her music. Their album, Hell on Heels, garnered rave reviews. The All Music Guide called the trio "a remarkably democratic supergroup" while veteran music critic Robert Christgau gave the album an A grade, citing its "expertly executed tunes."


    Despite her list of previous accomplishments, everything she's done so far feels like it's been pointing the way toward Like a Rose. With songs that run the gamut from feel-good to controversial to contemplative, the album, produced by country music titan Vince Gill, offers the full range of Ashley Monroe's songwriting and performing skills. To maintain the honesty of Ashley's songs, Gill and the singer chose to record the album the way most of the greatest albums ever were made: sans gimmickry. "We just got the band in a circle and started playing the songs," Ashley says, "and once we felt like we had a feel for it, I'd do my vocal live-I never went back in to do a second vocal. Everyone put everything we had into the songs. There was a buzz in the room. We all had fun-it felt like a big old family, the way records used to be made."


    Some of the songs were newly written for the album; others date back several years and felt right to revisit. The semi-autobiographical title track, one of the uncontestable highlights of the set, was co-written about six years ago with another totem of the American song-crafting community, Texan legend Guy Clark.


    One song that is bound to raise some eyebrows refers to the same favored flower of the title tune, but in a much different sense: "Weed Instead of Roses" tells of a woman's desire to get a gift she actually desires from her beau, not just something that smells good.


    "You Got Me" was co-written by Monroe and Karen Fairchild. Says Ashley, "It's about an addiction to something-one thing or another, whether you're stuck in a bad relationship or alcohol or whatever it is-and you try to hide it and fight it but you're kind of saying, 'Alright, you got me.'


    On a more light-hearted note is "Monroe Suede," based on "a slick character that tries to get away all the time." Another is the self-explanatory "You Ain't Dolly (And You Ain't Porter)," a duet featuring Lambert's husband, CMA Entertainer of the Year Blake Shelton. "Morning After" confronts that uneasy feeling that often follows a too-good time and "She's Driving Me Out Of Your Mind," written with Jon Randall Stewart, comes straight from one of Ashley's many journals. "Two Weeks Late" was suggested by singer-songwriter Shane McAnally, who co-wrote it with Monroe. "He came in and said, 'I heard this phrase at the ATM: I'm a dollar short and two weeks late.' That was another one that just fell out. I grabbed the guitar and we started writing it up.


    "Used," another standout, is an update of a song that appeared on Monroe's Satisfied album. "It came to me when I was about 17 and my manager at the time had just bought me this old 1950s Gibson guitar," she says. It came into my mind that things are worth more used, and I thought about my mom, who had lost my dad when she was 38. I was thinking, she had two kids, she's been through a lot, and, bless her heart, it's all gonna be worth it. Vince and I worked up this new version, which made it fresh for me."


    And fresh it all is. Like a Rose avoids the trappings of too much contemporary music by sticking to the basics: memorable songs, incredible musicians, a superb voice, all of it captured honestly and without frills. As the saying goes, sometimes we need to stop and smell the roses. Take a whiff of Like a Rose and you'll find it smells pretty darn sweet.

    1. Like A Rose
    2. Two Weeks Late
    3. Used
    4. Weed Instead of Roses
    5. You Got Me
    6. The Morning After
    7. Monroe Suede
    8. She's Driving Me Out Of Your Mind
    9. You Ain't Dolly (And You Ain't Porter) ft. Blake Shelton
    Ashley Monroe
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress) The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $31.99
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    The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress)

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like "Death Rider," "The Beast Within," and "Raise The Dead" already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby "Blitz" Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.


    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.


    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. "It just makes sense for us," reflects D.D. "If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing "Grinder," the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work."


    "One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time," seconds Blitz. "Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics."


    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in "Come Heavy" and Iron Maiden in "The Long Road" and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.


    "Punk is huge for Overkill," confirms Verni. "And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world."


    Central to that premise is the incendiary "Let's All Go to Hades" which is sure to become a pit favourite. "This one was a hell of a lot of fun," says Blitz. "You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more."


    Adds D.D., "It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes."


    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is "Our Finest Hour." "It's about the recognition of sameness," explains Ellsworth. "I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune."


    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like "The Long Road." D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. "Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.


    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on "Our Finest Hour," is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.


    "I've had that kind of sound now for a long time," says Verni. "There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars."


    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. "Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds."


    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.


    "That's the strength of the band," explains Blitz. "Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization."


    And Ron? "He's one-of-a-kind," says Verni. "He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it."


    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.


    "I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.


    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.


    "For sure," says Blitz. "One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear."

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
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