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  • Hell Yeah Hell Yeah Quick View

    $25.99
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    Hell Yeah

    Pioneers, philosophers, trailblazers, in short: prophets always have to assemble their flocks abroad before they find due recognition in their homelands. This also applies to the German artform KMFDM. Whether in the US, Japan, Australia or elsewhere (where they sold hundred thousands of records and embarked on various sold out tours) - for over a quarter of a century they are the epitome and synonym for a musical style of the harder variety: Industrial Rock. KMFDM pioneered the crossover between techno/dance and heavy metal, creating their unique sound and were one of the first bands to bring Industrial Rock to mainstream. They influenced bands such as Rammstein with whom they were touring the US - with KMFDM headlining. The band was founded in 1984 and rapidly evolved year by year through intense experimentation and touring. They have managed to redefine themselves with every new release.


    Now KMFDM are preparing to release their first new studio album in over 3 years entitled HELL YEAH via earMUSIC. An EP, YEAH! was released earlier to whet fans appetite and features some great remixes. Lead single HELL YEAH is an instant KMFDM classic with its ultra-heavy beat and Sascha Konietzko s trademark cynical lyrics. The album ranges from songs that are sometimes political (FAKE NEWS, TOTAL STATE MACHINE) to more techno/dance tracks (MURDER MY HEART and Rx 4 THE DAMNED).


    With its cover artwork having been created by Aidan Hughes aka BRUTE!, HELL YEAH will be available on 2xLP Gatefold (180 Gram/45 RPM).

    1. Hell Yeah
    2. Freak Flag
    3. Oppression 1/2
    4. Total State Machine
    5. Oppression 2/2
    6. Murder My Heart
    7. Rip The System V. 2.0
    8. Shock
    9. Fake News
    10. Rx 4 The Damned
    11. Burning Brain
    12. Only Lovers
    13. Glam, Glitz, Gutz & Gore
    KMFDM
    $25.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP 45 RPM - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Kiss Kiss Kill Kill Kiss Kiss Kill Kill Quick View

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    Kiss Kiss Kill Kill

    Their third release finds the band perfectly poised between the raw punk energy of their 2004 debut, Hell Yeah, and the brash, singalong pop of 2006's Bring It On. While never dropping their trademark sexy, horror flick flair, Kiss Kiss Kill Kill brings back the rawness and immediacy that's made them the premier touring band in the scene. They just finished two tours with the Dropkick Murphys and a tour with Danzig, have shared the stage with the likes of Rancid and The Offspring, and have been on several Warped Tour runs. RIYL: Nekromantix, Rev. Horton Heat, Siouxsie And The Banshees, X, Stray Cats, surf, punk, ska, and good ol' rock 'n' roll.
    1.Thelma & Louise
    2.MissFit
    3.Boot To Boot
    4.Heading to the Disco
    5.Kiss Kiss Kill Kill
    6.Everything's Everything
    7.Hitchcock Starlet
    8.Highway 55
    9.Horrorbeach Part 2
    10.Copenhagen Refugee
    11.Keep My Picture!
    12.Private Hall Of Shame
    13.Rebel Yell (Live)
    Horrorpops
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bring It On! Bring It On! Quick View

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    Bring It On!

    While never dropping their trademark sexy, horror-flick flair, their new CD, produced by Bad Religion's Brett Gurewitz, reveals new depths of songwriting. Brash, Link Wray guitars, singer Patricia's sultry petulance, throbbing standup bass; all served up in loving tribute to the brooding pop of '80s icons like Blondie and Siouxsie Sioux. With two European headlining tours, performances on BBC1 and Jimmy Kimmel, and a major Warped Tour under their belts, HorrorPops are set to build on the musical success of their 2004 debut, Hell Yeah. And kick some ass.
    1.Freaks in Uniforms
    2.Hit 'N Run
    3.Bring It On!
    4.It's Been So Long
    5.Undefeated
    6.You vs. Me
    7.Crawl Straight Home
    8.Trapped
    9.Walk Like a Zombie
    10.Where You Can't Follow
    11.Caught in a Blonde
    12.S.O.B.
    13.Who's Leading You Now
    Horrorpops
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • We Sweat Blood (Awaiting Repress) We Sweat Blood (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $17.99
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    We Sweat Blood (Awaiting Repress)

    All of the warning signs are right there on the cover: the band name in a jagged and stylized font, a close-up on someone playing an electric guitar, and dripping blood. Yeah, that's right, this is a metal album. It was pretty clear on Born a Lion that Danko Jones was already heading in this direction, with loud boogie-soaked riffs that owed more to AC/DC than the revved-up funk that served as the bedrock of the group's two early EPs. Not that you'd confuse We Sweat Blood for commercial-grade metal: there's very little bombast and absolutely zero hand-wringing earnestness here. The production is incredibly crisp -- instead of soaking everything in sight with reverb, most of the vocals are clean and the drums snap like whip cracks -- and the performance is very clean, with no pointless wailing from either the vocals or guitars. Everything has been stripped back to the basics: sex, Satan, and super-high volume. Sure, the lyrics are so over the top in places that it's almost like the band has become a cartoon: in the album opener, Forget My Name, She makes me forget my name is followed up by I wanna, I wanna, I wanna burn in Hell with you. Elsewhere, Baby I want to put some mileage on your lovebike/I want you out on the road with my testosterone make you feel alright is delivered with a straight face. There's even a tribute to one of fellow Canadian Neil Young's sillier lyrics. Deathless prose for the ages this ain't, but it doesn't really matter, because the groove is deep, the rock is hard, and those who aren't shaking their hips will probably be resisting the urge to follow along on the ol' air guitar. Yow. - Sean Carruthers (All Music Guide)
    1. Forget My Name
    2. Dance
    3. I Love Living In The City
    4. I Want You
    5. Heartbreak's A Blessing
    6. Wait A Minute
    7. Strut
    8. Home To Hell
    9. Hotdamn Woman
    10. The Cross
    11. Love Travel
    12. We Sweat Blood
    13. Woogie Boogie
    14. Documentary
    15. I Want You
    Danko Jones
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Vessel Vessel Quick View

    $18.99
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    Vessel

    The first track of Vessels, "Fear the Followers", comes in with tight frantic riffing coupled by a stark immediate thrash part. The song, bordering on hardcore underneath, is screamed in two separate distinct voices; one being a screechier version of the lower growls. A strict delivery of sharp metalcore is prevalent. But then the middle dips into some Sabbath swings before further slowing with cymbals crashing and synths.


    Track two, "Buried in the City", however exploits the notion of the riff and just goes full throttle doom metal. The tidal journey is engrossing, barbaric! Without rehashing any hacked riff, Cokegoat comes in with snarling bit of doom metal. It carries significant weight as a tribute to classic sounds while approaching them differently. The layered vocal and galloping metal guitars spark the energy of the finish.


    "Dogs" contrasts that with a cosmic synth aura and a taut minimalist riff approach for a tense 3 minutes. Then the explosion of a sinister 1970's free-wheeling riff takes center stage. All of which are to be manipulated into an Unsane, Faith No More ("Malpractice, "Caffeine") ugly place. Eventually, among static shorelines, we get a dreamy recoil into a bluesy meandering.


    Cokegoat begs you to pinpoint them, not by album but by the minute.


    There are continuous bounces from Strife type hardcore intros (I swear) to scathing black metal nods. Usually bands that boast that spectrum of influence are raw and crusty and loose in the production. This is tight as sutures. Andy Nelson of Weekend Nachos engineered this and Carl Saff (Unsane, Red Fang, Earthless) mastered the final sound for this. Not surprising. Heavy is a key factor in Vessels.


    Vessels is one hell of a debut. This bitch has balls. But quickly flashes some groove. "The End of Your Life Pt 2" is controlled chaos. It also is one of two 2-part songs. Yeah. This is foresight, ambition, ardor and grit in this album. Here we have "three guitarists, three voices, synths, bass and drums," kept on a production leash that adds an urgency to the manic time changes. Which crush. The atmospheric layers are just touches. They add mood but never take center stage. This is about riffs, but Cokegoat know where to accent their talents as well.


    FFO: Sons of Otis, Type O Negative, Monster Magnet, Electric Wizard, early Baroness, Mastodon, Black Tusk, Moss, ASG, The Gates of Slumber, Earthride (Hutch)


    - New Noise Magazine

    1. Fear the Followers
    2. Buried In The City
    3. Dogs
    4. End of Your Life, Pt. 1
    5. End of Your Life, Pt. 2
    6. Fly by Night, Pt. 2
    7. Fly by Daylight
    8. Glorious Dead
    Cokegoat
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brothers and Sisters of the Eternal Son Brothers and Sisters of the Eternal Son Quick View

    $16.99
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    Brothers and Sisters of the Eternal Son

    Damien is out of his goddamn mind.


    This isn't a recent development, but it's an important aspect of his work that often goes ignored. In place of
    this key element is the idea that his music is a sober and in-depth excavation of the American landscape and
    rural psyche. Well, folks,I'm sorry, but it's not.


    Damien Jurado is every character in every Damien Jurado song. He is the gun,the purple anteater,the paper
    wings, the avalanche, the airshow disaster, Ohio, the ghost of his best friend's wife. It is a universe unto its
    own,with it's own symbolism, creation myth, and liturgy. You might go as far as to call it a religion, and your
    religion is a character in his religion.


    Level with me. You're reading this because of Damien Jurado's new album,Brothers and Sisters of the Eternal
    Son (produced by Richard Swift). You are a progressive minded, left-leaning person who in parlor-style
    conversation regarding the globo-political ramifications of Sky Person relationships laughs knowingly so as
    not to be judgmental and very reasonably concedes "Well, I don't believe He's some old man with a beard
    sitting up in the clouds" at which point everyone agrees on [insert benign middle-ground] and moves on.


    Consider this:What if the only way to understand a religion is to create your own?


    Who is this Silver community? Where the hell are they in the Bible? Is this heresy? Agnostic reference? Isn't
    this sun business a little, I don't know, animistic? Pagan? Go ahead and answer that question for yourself. I'll
    give you a second.


    Do you understand the music any better?


    You know that adage we all use so we have something to say while we shrug our shoulders? "People change"?
    That one. Is that applicable to Jesus Christ? Maybe he's been on a personal journey of discovery since he
    ascended. He went through the 60's, 70's,he turned on,tuned out, got disillusioned. Why can't we talk about
    that Jesus? Does it have to be the old-timey one all the time? American folk Jesus,ugh. The one who's always
    winning Best Soundtrack Oscars for people. Rarely do stories of faith make us identify with Jesus. It's
    Abraham, Satan, Silver Timothy, Salome, Dr.J, Saul of Tarsus; divinely imperfect brothers and sisters who give
    Gawd something to do.


    Damien Jurado made up his own Jesus because a Damien Jurado album needs a beautiful Jesus. Some freaky
    space Jesus that I don't recognize. The name is the same, a lot of the imagery is the same, but he's reborn.
    Born again,I mean. Yeah, as if Jesus got born again. That's what this album sounds like.


    Jesus is out of his goddamn mind and I want to live in Damien's America.


    Sign me up.


    --- Father John Misty; 09-20-2013

    1. Magic Number
    2. Silver Timothy
    3. Return To Maraqopa
    4. Metallic Cloud
    5. Jericho Road
    6. Silver Donna
    7. Silver Malcolm
    8. Silver Katherine
    9. Silver Joy
    10. Suns In Our Mind
    Damien Jurado
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress) The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
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    The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress)

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like "Death Rider," "The Beast Within," and "Raise The Dead" already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby "Blitz" Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.


    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.


    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. "It just makes sense for us," reflects D.D. "If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing "Grinder," the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work."


    "One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time," seconds Blitz. "Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics."


    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in "Come Heavy" and Iron Maiden in "The Long Road" and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.


    "Punk is huge for Overkill," confirms Verni. "And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world."


    Central to that premise is the incendiary "Let's All Go to Hades" which is sure to become a pit favourite. "This one was a hell of a lot of fun," says Blitz. "You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more."


    Adds D.D., "It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes."


    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is "Our Finest Hour." "It's about the recognition of sameness," explains Ellsworth. "I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune."


    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like "The Long Road." D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. "Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.


    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on "Our Finest Hour," is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.


    "I've had that kind of sound now for a long time," says Verni. "There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars."


    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. "Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds."


    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.


    "That's the strength of the band," explains Blitz. "Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization."


    And Ron? "He's one-of-a-kind," says Verni. "He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it."


    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.


    "I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.


    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.


    "For sure," says Blitz. "One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear."

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) (Pre-Order) The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) (Pre-Order) Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
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    The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) (Pre-Order)

    Pressed On Yellow And Black Vinyl

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like Death Rider, The Beast Within, and Raise The Dead already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby Blitz Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.

    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.

    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. It just makes sense for us, reflects D.D. If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing Grinder, the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work.

    One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time, seconds Blitz. Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics.

    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in Come Heavy and Iron Maiden in The Long Road and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.

    Punk is huge for Overkill, confirms Verni. And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world.

    Central to that premise is the incendiary Let's All Go to Hades which is sure to become a pit favourite. This one was a hell of a lot of fun, says Blitz. You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more.

    Adds D.D., It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes.

    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is Our Finest Hour. It's about the recognition of sameness, explains Ellsworth. I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune.

    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like The Long Road. D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.

    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on Our Finest Hour, is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.

    I've had that kind of sound now for a long time, says Verni. There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars.

    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds.

    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.

    That's the strength of the band, explains Blitz. Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization.

    And Ron? He's one-of-a-kind, says Verni. He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it.

    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.

    I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.

    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.

    For sure, says Blitz. One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear.

    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed PRE-ORDER Buy Now
  • Sleep Is The Enemy Sleep Is The Enemy Quick View

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    Sleep Is The Enemy

    If there's one thing Danko Jones know how to do at this point, it's how to rock. They did it in We Sweat Blood, and it's exactly what they do again in their fifth full-length album, Sleep Is the Enemy. The formula for both these albums has been pretty consistent: fast power chords with a distorted bass echoing the guitar; loud, driving drums; and vocals that fluctuate from a low growl to a mellifluous croon to a full-out scream. But that doesn't mean the new album is ever boring: there's too much raw emotion and sexual energy to allow anyone even a brief moment to nod off. For the band, this is a very important thing; the name of the record is Sleep Is the Enemy, after all, and the simple, to-the-point choruses are just meant to be shouted along to in packed, sweaty stadiums. Jones himself is all testosterone and bravado and is in great form vocally, expressing his indifference toward a jaded lover in Baby Hates Me, instructing the less confident in when and how to give The Finger, and angrily yelling his plans for revenge in Time Heals Nothing. Yes, the themes here, like they always have been with the band, are women and sex and aggression, which are practically the same thing for Jones, but in Sleep Is the Enemy his willingness to explore the ambiguity of the topics shows his (slightly greater) maturity. In She's Drugs (which contains the fantastically catchy chorus She's drugs, she's drugs/Just one look and you get addicted/She's drugs, she's drugs/You take a look and now you're hooked, that's what I predicted), he chides a friend for being seduced by a dangerous woman, but then in Invisible, he goes on to list a number of extreme things he'll do for another who isn't noticing him (burning his house down, maxing out his credit card, and making his mother cry being three of the least violent examples). Yeah, Sleep Is the Enemy isn't musical genius by any standard, but it is a loud, confident, straightforward, and fun album that skips guitar solos and instrumental frills to focus on what truly matters to Danko Jones: rocking. - Marisa Brown (All Music Guide)
    1. Sticky Situation
    2. Baby Hates Me
    3. Don't Fall In Love
    4. She's Drugs
    5. The Finger
    6. First Date
    7. Invisible
    8. Natural Tan
    9. When Will I See You
    10. Time Heals Nothing
    11. Sleep Is The Enemy
    12. Choose Me
    Danko Jones
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Dreamland Dreamland Quick View

    $19.99
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    Dreamland

    Natalie Bergman has had her picture taken on countless occasions -- hundreds of studio portraits and live shots and backstage festival snaps. But the simple, gorgeous black & white photo of Bergman on the cover of Wild Belle's Dreamland that she describes as just me and this sort of abyss That one was lensed by the person who best knows how to capture her essence on celluloid: Her older brother and bandmate, Elliot Bergman. Besides being Wild Belle's multi-instrumentalist extraordinaire, Elliot has an equally impressive flair for visual arts, from painting and sculpture to bronzemaking and photography. An avid collector of vintage cameras, Elliot brought along a recently acquired Polaroid Land Camera to a show Wild Belle played in Denver this summer: The duo grabbed a quick moment at their hotel to take the portraits of each other that grace the front and back of their new record. The pictures Elliot takes of me are always really beautiful and it's because he knows me better than anyone else on this Earth, says Natalie. Adds Elliot: I like that it's a photo of Natalie just being Natalie. And the stark contrast of her in the foreground with the dark background really fit with these collages she has been doing. Natalie is in the light but the shadows are pretty heavy and you can't really tell where she is or what's back there.


    Recorded at studios in their native Chicago, Natalie's new home of Los Angeles, Nashville and Toronto, Dreamland -- Wild Belle's bold, evolutionary new album -- derives from an era in the singer's life when she was struggling to get control of what she describes as the anger and deep sorrow that plagued her at the end of her most recent romantic relationship. For a woman whose music has always been inspired by her desire to translate her complicated feelings into immediately relatable songs, there was certainly plenty of grist for the mill. Dreamland tracks such as Losing You and It Was You (Baby Come Back) offer glimpses of the darkness that Natalie battled during the early months writing for the duo's sophomore full-length. But there are also genuine moments of lightness and ecstatic triumph, like Giving Up On You -- an irresistibly kinetic, punk number Wild Belle recorded with TV On The Radio's Dave Sitek producing.


    I was very heated when we were making this record. My body, my heart and my soul were filled with a flame, which sounds very dramatic but it's the truth, says Natalie. I had a healing moment when I moved to LA earlier this year, because I was far away from my ex and I felt like I was getting rid of a lot of baggage. That was the redemptive, triumphant time for my lyrics. On 'Giving Up On You,' I sing: 'Now I smile so bright, you can see me from outer space, look at me shine. Baby it's about time, I was so miserable and now I feel so alive.' All the songs I wrote near the end of making the album have that sentiment: 'Now look at where I am, after all the turmoil that was inside of me, I'm here and I'm happy and I'm ready for whatever comes my way.'


    The follow-up to 2013's Isles, Dreamland expands the band's ambitions in every way. It's deeper, it's more fun, it's more haunting, it's got more grooves, Elliot says. There's sorrow and pain but there's also hope and joy -- all those things can coexist in the songs because they coexist in life. He continues: Dreamland, that's not some kind of idealized notion of where we live and I hope people hear that as a question: What is the Dreamland What is our dream here The album doesn't get overtly political, but we're dealing with a lot of the things that are dark about what's happening now. 'Throw Down Your Guns' is about a relationship but is also kind of about the messed up situation that we're in right now. The chorus, 'Throw down your guns / In the name of love, I put my hands up,' to me can be heard in a number of ways, including as a prayer for peace or a cry out against violence.


    Importantly, the album also shares its name with one of the first songs Natalie remembers Elliot introducing her to: Bunny Wailer's 1970 reggae classic, Dreamland. One year for Christmas, he gave her a compilation of female artists who recorded at Jamaica's legendary Studio One, and it included Della Humphrey's version of the song. Natalie listened to it over and over and over again. I was so in love with it, she says. From there, I started my exploration of rocksteady and ska and lovers rock and anything that had to do with Jamaican music from the Fifties onward.


    The duo started writing music together several years ago, after Elliot took a sixteen year-old Natalie on tour to play percussion with his acclaimed Afrobeat ensemble, NOMO. I can present a song to Elliot and he has this foresight -- he can see things further than I see them, and he helps me realize things, she says. I'd been writing very simple melodic love songs since I was fifteen years old. I definitely have a pop sensibility in my style, and that's a great platform for Elliot to work from, because it's fun for him to have a cool little pop song and combine it with more eccentric sounds and make it into a weird, unique percussive jam. Sometimes he'll bring the jam to me and because we've got this routine together, we can write a song together wherever we are.


    Work on the album began in early 2014, in Chicago. The song that opens Dreamland -- Mississippi River -- was also the first one to come together in the studio. It was sparked by a moment of musical serendipity: The record starts with this pulsing ARP drone, says Elliot, which is a very expensive esoteric nerdy synthesizer that's complicated to program. Natalie and I had this weird, symbiotic thing where I was playing three chords off the ARP and she started playing different three chords on this out-of-tune autoharp she brought over. They were both completely in the wrong key, and yet perfectly in tune with each other. That was like the new bar for the record. It was like, 'Yeah, we're going to put synthesizers and saxophone and kalimbas on these songs, and we're going to have lavish string arrangements if we want to. We were getting comfortable with all of the materials that we love, and being like, 'I love this, so let's do it.


    They tracked several songs at home in Chicago last year, and then at the start of 2015, Natalie packed all of her belongings into the Wild Belle van and drove from Chicago to Venice, California. She rented a house where Elliot joined her a couple weeks later. When I had my place in Venice, Elliot would wake up earlier than I would and start making dope beats, says Natalie. One day he made this ridiculous song, 'The One That Got Away,' and the beat and underlying track were so exciting that it didn't take very long to write. Our friends came over and were jumping on the tabletops, dancing, getting naked because they loved the song so much.


    Playing the new songs at Lollapalooza for the first time with an eight-piece band, says Elliot, I had a feeling onstage that I'd never had before with Wild Belle, where you're part of a sound that's much bigger than you could make on your own. It's this charged-up badass feeling. It's about a groove and rhythmic energy and force and momentum and making a big, dark, deep sound -- something that moves people and makes you want to dance and makes you want to shout. It's tapping into a deeper musicality that I've always been looking for.

    1. Mississippi River
    2. Losing You
    3. Dreamland
    4. Coyotes
    5. Cannonball
    6. Giving Up On You
    7. It Was You
    8. Throw Down Your Guns
    9. The One That Got Away
    10. Our Love Will Survive
    11. Rock & Roll Angel
    Wild Belle
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • TV En Français (On Sale) TV En Français (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $19.99 $15.79 Save $4.20 (21%)

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    TV En Français (On Sale)

    13 years and 3 albums in, We Are Scientists are back with album number 4.


    The new long player was recorded in New York City over the last year with producer Chris Coady (Smith Westerns, Beach House, Gang Gang Dance, Blonde Redhead), and will land in the middle of the band's 5 month tour of Europe, America & Australia.


    Asked to comment on the unusual title, bassist Chris Cain explains, It's in French, I think. At least some of the words.


    Singer and guitarist Keith Murray elaborates: We wanted to get at the seemingly inevitable parallax that happens between two people in a relationship, that sense that you get the gist of what the other person needs and wants and how they feel about you, but only the gist - you're relying on these broad cues a lot of the time to tell you what the hell's going on.


    We Are Scientists exploded onto the U.K. scene with one of 2005's iconic indie dance rock records, 'With Love & Squalor'. Years of touring followed, as did a second album, 'Brain Thrust Mastery', that spawned now-classic nightlife anthem 'After Hours' (a #11 charting single). Main stage slots at Reading & Leeds,
    Glastonbury, T In The Park, and festivals all over Europe, as well as appearances on Later with Jools Holland, and their own series of comedic MTV shorts ('Steve Wants His Money'), followed by third album 'Barbara'. all served to cement and increase their legacy.


    Now, after releasing a 7-inch and a 5-song EP in 2013, the band prepare to share their finest collection of songs to date.


    According to Cain, The guy who was producing everything looked different from the one who did those other three records.


    Murray further enthuses, Yeah, working for the first time with Chris Coady as producer had a huge effect - he has such a distinct and well-developed sense of what's cool and what sounds good, but he's also emphatic about keeping the rawness of the performances in there.


    Drummer Andy Burrows, who also recorded 'Barbara' with W.A.S., relocated to New York for a year to work on the new album, and lends his world-class efforts behind the kit and elsewhere.


    - Contact Music

    1. What You Do Best
    2. Dumb Luck
    3. Make It Easy
    4. Sprinkles
    5. Courage
    6. Overreacting
    7. Return The Favor
    8. Slow Down
    9. Don't Blow It
    10.Take An Arrow
    We Are Scientists
    $19.99 $15.79 Save $4.20 (21%)
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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