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  • The Chase Is On (Pure Pleasure) The Chase Is On (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    The Chase Is On (Pure Pleasure)

    The twin tenor sax tradition yielded grand pairings with the likes of Wardell Gray and Dexter Gordon, Arnett Cobb and Eddie 'Lockjaw' Davis, Gene Ammons and Sonny Stitt, and Al Cohn and Zoot Sims. This one-shot teaming of Charlie Rouse and Paul Quinichette brought forth a union of two distinctly different mannerisms within the mainstream jazz continuum. Rouse, who would go on to prolific work with Thelonious Monk and was at this time working with French horn icon Julius Watkins, developed a fluid signature sound that came out of the more strident and chatty style heard here. By this time in 1957, Quinichette, nicknamed the Vice Prez for his similar approach to Lester Young, was well established in the short term with Count Basie. His liquid, full-bodied, soulful tone became an undeniable force, albeit briefly, before he dropped out of the scene shortly after this date to be an electrical engineer. The stereo split of the saxophonists in opposite channels, a technique endemic of the time, works well whether they play solos or melody lines together. It enables you to truly hear how different they are. Working with standards, there's a tendency for them to play the head arrangements in unison, but then one of them on occasion plays an off-the-cuff short phrase that strays from the established melodic path. They also seem to do a hard bop jam, then a ballad, and back to hard swinging.


    The title track is simply a killer, a perfect fun romp of battling duelists, and one that you'd like to hear in any nightclub setting. Some slight harmonic inserts set This Can't Be Love apart from the original and The Things I Love displays the two tenors at their conversational best, while the lone original, Knittin', is a fundamental 12-bar swing blues, straight up and simple but with some subtle harmonic nuances. The rhythm section of pianist Wynton Kelly, bass player Wendell Marshall, and drummer Ed Thigpen do their usual yeoman job. But on two tracks, pianist Hank Jones and rhythm guitarist Freddie Green take over, and the sound of the band changes dramatically to the more sensitive side on a low-down version of When The Blues Come On and the good-old basic vintage swinger You're Cheating Yourself. The combination of Rouse and Quinichette was a very satisfactory coupling of two talented and promising post-swing to bop individualists, who played to all of their strengths and differences on this worthy -- and now legendary -- session.


    Musicians:



    • Charlie Rouse, Paul Quinichette (tenor saxophone)

    • Wynton Kelly, Hank Jones (piano)

    • Freddie Green (guitar)

    • Wendell Marshall (bass)

    • Ed Thigpen (drums)



    Recording :August and September 1957 in New York




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. The Chase Is On
    2. When The Blues Come On
    3. This Can't Be Love
    4. Last Time For Love
    5. You're Cheating Yourself
    6. Knittin'
    7. Tender Trap
    8. The Things I Love
    Paul Quinichette & Charlie Rouse
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Jazz Workshop (Speakers Corner) The Jazz Workshop (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $37.99
    Buy Now
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    The Jazz Workshop (Speakers Corner)

    As a soloist, Al Cohn was not such an inspired tenor sax player as his colleague Zoot Sims. But he was a superb arranger, an unprofitable yet highly important function when it comes to such workshops. And though Manny Albam also played the baritone sax, his real instrument was the pen. He arranged not only jazz, but also film music and musicals. His arrangements were multi-faceted and tailor-made to suit the accomplishments of the individual instrumentalists.

    For this particular Jazz Workshop, the record company RCA-Victor could afford the services of excellent session musicians: Joe Newman and Freddie Green came from the Basie Band, Al Cohn, Bernie Glow, and Nick Travis from the Woody Herman Band, and the studio musicians Dick Katz, Buddy Jones, and Osie Johnson were present at all times of day and night anyway.

    As long as you don't expect fierce battles between five tenors, or six tweeters on the trumpet, then you will enjoy this LP with its swinging, relaxed improvisations on such works as Rosetta, Linger Awhile, and I'm Coming Virginia - and you will realise that Lester Young's sound has been heard, cultivated and further developed by these musicians.

    Four trumpets, a tenor sax, and then a piano, guitar, bass, and drums into the bargain - that's certainly no common ensemble, but it certainly is a good reason to purchase this LP. And for certain, this album has been missing in your collection to this day.

    This Speakers Corner LP was remastered using pure analogue components only, from the master tapes through to the cutting head. All royalties and mechanical rights have been paid.

    Musicians:
    Al Cohn (tenor saxophone, arranger)
    Manny Albam (arranger)
    Joe Newman, Bart Valve, Bernie Glow, Joe Wilder, Phil Sunkel (trumpet)
    Nick Travis (trumper, trombone)
    Dick Katz (piano)
    Freddie Green (guitar)
    Buddy Jones (bass)
    Osie Johnson (drums)

    Recording: May 1955 in Webster Hall, New York City, in mono
    Production: Jack Lewis

    About Speakers Corner

    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.

    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.

    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.

    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.

    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.

    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Rosetta
    2. The Song Is Ended
    3. Linger Awhile
    4. Every Time
    5. Haroosh
    6. Just Plain Sam
    7. I'm Coming Virginia
    8. Cohn Not Cohen
    9. Foggy Water
    11. Sugar Cohn
    12. Alone Together
    Al Cohn
    $37.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Mono - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Boss Of The Blues (Pure Pleasure) The Boss Of The Blues (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Boss Of The Blues (Pure Pleasure)

    Besides helping to invent rock 'n roll with his hit Shake, Rattle and Roll, Big Joe Turner was one of the most soulful blues shouters of all time. His best albums married the boogie-woogie piano stylings of the great Pete Johnson with a jazzy jumpin' horn section. Boss Of The Blues is arguably Joe's best recording, in part because he sang with particular gusto during these 1956 sessions. At the time, Boss Of The Blues marked a nostalgic return to the jump-blues style that Turner helped pioneer in the '40s. Besides Johnson, Boss featured some of Kansas City's finest ever jazzmen and various members of Count Basie's band, including Joe Newman (trumpet), Pete Brown (alto sax), Lawrence Brown (trombone), Frank Wess (tenor sax) and Freddie Green (guitar). The bawdy Cherry Red and the rollicking Roll 'Em Pete are my favorite Turner-Johnson collaborations. Both feature some incredible playing by the piano master. Turner's versions of I Want A Little Girl, Low Down Dog, You're Driving Me Crazy, and Morning Glories are definitive. If I had to compile a list of my 10 favorite albums, Boss Of The Blues would be there.



    Musicians:



    • Joe Turner (vocal)

    • Joe Newman (trumpet)

    • Lawrence Brown (trombone)

    • Pete Brown (alto saxophone)

    • Frank Wess (tenor saxophone)

    • Pete Johnson (piano)

    • Freddie Green (guitar)

    • Walter Page (bass)

    • Cliff Leeman (drums)




    Recording:1956 in New York by Len Frank

    Production: Nesuhi Ertegun & Jerry Wexler




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Cherry Red
    2. Roll 'Em Pete
    3. I Want a Little Girl
    4. Low Down Dog
    5. Wee Baby Blues
    6. You're Driving Me Crazy (What Did I Do?)
    7. How Long Blues
    8. Morning Glories
    9. St. Louis Blues
    10. Piney Brown Blues
    Big Joe Turner
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Blue Lester Blue Lester Quick View

    $30.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Blue Lester

    Lester Young ( the Prez )'s classic LP Blue Lester features the tenor master at his peak and includes what would become his lifelong theme song - Blue Lester. Guests include Roy Haynes, Johnny Guarneri, Count Basie, Freddie Greene and many other jazz luminaries.
    LP 1
    1. Ghost Of A Chance
    2. Crazy Over Jazz
    3. Ding Dong
    4. Back Home In Indiana
    5. These Foolish Things
    6. Exercise In Swing


    LP 2
    1. Blue's N' Bells
    2. Salute To Fats
    3. June Bug
    4. Blue Lester
    5. Jump Lester Jump
    6. Basie English

    Lester Young
    $30.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Super Bass Super Bass Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Super Bass

    A tribute to Freddie Green. Musicians include Jeff Hamilton, Jeff Clayton, John Clayton and Freddie Green. Super Bass has been a dream of mine longer than I can remember. Back in 1945 I did One Bass Hit and in 1946 I did Two Bass Hit. All that time I had thoughts of doing the Triple and the Home Run. Well I guess Super Bass is a fulfillment to those two. First of all I had this young student that returned from studying at Indiana University as a complete wizard of the bass. He also was studying conducting and arranging and will be one of the top arrangers in the music business. His name is John Clayton and he is a major part of this album. The LP edition has been remastered by Doug Sax off the original master tapes through custom tube electronics. Pressing done by Quality Record Pressings on 200 gram of pure virgin vinyl. This album was produced to the same standards of all Analogue Productions LPs.
    1. One Armed Bandit
    2. Bag's Groove
    3. Swing Jig
    4. Killer Joe
    5. Medley
    6. Righteous Boogie Bass
    7. Hues
    8. Goodbye Freddie Green
    9. Five O'Clock Whistle
    10. Happy Days Are Here Again
    Ray Brown
    $34.99
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sarah Vaughan In Hi Fi (Pure Pleasure) Sarah Vaughan In Hi Fi (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Sarah Vaughan In Hi Fi (Pure Pleasure)

    Most of Sarah Vaughan's Columbia recordings were on the commercial side, but not the memorable selections on this wonderful vinyl reissue. She recorded eight selections in 1950 with an octet that included trumpeter Miles Davis, trombonist Benny Green, the remarkably cool clarinetist Tony Scott and tenorman Budd Johnson. This double LP adds alternate takes to seven of the numbers, none on the original single LP release. This version of Ain't Misbehavin' is a true classic (with memorable eight-bar solos by each of the four horns); Mean To Me and Nice Work If You Can Get It are gems, and the other performances are not far behind. In addition, Vaughan sings two versions of The Nearness Of You in 1949; there is also a previously unknown recording of It's All In The Mind, and three orchestra numbers from 1951 and 1953 wrap up the outstanding reissue. Sassy has rarely sounded better.




    Musicians:



    • Sarah Vaughan (vocal)

    • Stan Webb (bassoon)

    • Budd Johnson (tenor saxophone)

    • Miles Davis (trumpet)

    • Benny Green (trombone)

    • Tony Scott (clarinet)

    • Jimmy Jones (piano)

    • Freddie Green (guitar)

    • J.C. Heard (drums)




    Recording: December 1949, May 1950 and December 1952



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. East Of The Sun (And West Of The Moon)
    2. Nice Work If You Can Get It
    3. Pinky
    4. The Nearness Of You
    5. Come Rain Or Come Shine
    6. Mean To Me
    7. It Might As Well Be Spring
    8. Cant Get Out Of this Mood
    9. Spring Will Be A Little Late This Year
    10. Ooh, What Cha Doin To Me

    11. Goodnight My Love
    12. Aint Misbehavin
    13. Its All In The Mind
    14. The Nearness Of You (alternate take)
    15. Aint Misbehavin (alternate take)
    16. Goodnight My Love (alternate take)
    17. Cant Get Out Of this Mood (alternate take)
    18. It Might As Well Be Spring (alternate take)
    19. Mean To Me (alternate take)
    20. Come Rain Or Come Shine (alternate take)
    21. East Of The Sun (And West Of The Moon) (alternate take)
    Sarah Vaughan
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • First Time!: Count Meets The Duke (Pure Pleasure) First Time!: Count Meets The Duke (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    First Time!: Count Meets The Duke (Pure Pleasure)

    The musical event which is presented in this album is without precedent in the history of jazz. History largely consists of chronicling momentous occasions, and it was such an occaision when the full orchestras of Duke Ellington and Count Basie recorded together on 6th July 1961. The result is almost an embarrassment of riches. It is great in significance, great in musical content and, above all, great in demonstrating the two famous leaders' mutual appreciation and understanding of each other.



    At first glance this collaboration should not have worked. The Duke Ellington and Count Basie Orchestras had already been competitors for 25 years but the leaders' mutual admiration (Ellington was one of Basie's main idols) and some brilliant planning made this a very successful and surprisingly uncrowded encounter. On most selections Ellington and Basie both play piano (their interaction with each other is wonderful) and the arrangements allowed the stars from both bands to take turns soloing. Segue in C is the highpoint but versions of Until I Met You, Battle Royal and Jumpin' at the Woodside are not far behind.




    Musicians:



    • Count Basie, Duke Ellington (piano, arranger)

    • Johnny Hodges (alto saxophone)

    • Thad Jones (trumpet)

    • Ray Nance (trumpet, violin)

    • Russell Procope (reeds, alto saxophone)

    • Jimmy Hamilton (clarinet)

    • Freddie Green (guitar)

    • Billy Strayhorn (piano)

    • Eddie Jones (bass)

    • Sam Woodyard (drums)




    Recording: July 1961

    Production: Teo Macero



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Battle Royal
    2. To You
    3. Take the A Train
    4. Corner Pocker (aka Until I Met You)
    5. Wild Man (aka Moore)
    6. Seque in C
    7. Jumpin' at the Woodside
    8. One More Once
    9. Take the A Train
    10. Jumpin' at the Woodside
    11. B D B
    12. Blues in Hoss' Flat
    13. Wild Man
    14. Battle Royal
    Duke Ellington
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • In The Winner's Circle (Pure Pleasure) In The Winner's Circle (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    In The Winner's Circle (Pure Pleasure)

    Rare stuff from John Coltrane! The album features 'Trane' playing tenor on only 4 of the album's 8 tracks - making it kind of surprising that they used his name in the title - but the album is a lesser-known batch of large group recordings that offer an interesting early chapter in his career! The main force behind the album is arranger Harry Tubbs - possibly not a name that's as sexy as John Coltrane, hence the billing - but a worthy leader for the date, given the quality of the music.



    Many of the other players here are small combo heroes who can also shine brightly in bigger groups - such as Donald Byrd and Art Farmer on trumpets, Kenny Burrell on guitar, Al Cohn on baritone sax, Eddie Costa on piano and vibes, and Oscar Pettiford on bass - plus Rolf Kuhn, making an early American appearance on clarinet. Coltrane gets in some nice, but short moments on the date - but the bigger charm is the full ensemble work - on titles that include She Didn't Say Yes, Turtle Walk, At Home With The Blues, Seabreeze, and Love & The Weather.



    Musicians:



    • John Coltrane (tenor saxophone)

    • Donald Byrd, Art Farmer (trumpet)

    • Frank Rehak (trombone)

    • Gene Quill (alto saxophone)

    • Al Cohn (bassoon)

    • Rolf Kuhn (clarinet)

    • Eddie Costa (piano, vib)

    • Freddie Green, Kenny Burrell (guitar)

    • Oscar Pettiford (bass)

    • Philly Joe Jones, Ed Thigpen (drums



    Recording: September & October 1957 in New York City



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Lazy Afternoon
    2. Not So Sleepy
    3. Sea Breeze
    4. Love And The Weather
    5. She Didn't Say Yes
    6. If I'm Lucky
    7. At Home With The Blues
    8. Turtle Walk
    John Coltrane
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Good Feeling The Good Feeling Quick View

    $27.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Good Feeling


    Available on Audiophile 180 gram Vinyl for the First Time!


    2012 Grammy Winner - Best Large Jazz Ensemble!

    The good feeling you are about to feel is the kind that can only be derived by the collective efforts of players at the peak of their powers assembled and led by the one and only Christian McBride! The bassist with the mostest hosts an aggregation of players here including his own bandmate Steve Wilson, multi-reedman Ron Blake, trumpeter Nicholas Payton and his close personal friend, vocalist Melissa Walker. McB arranges and conducts the project, which has been a life-long dream of his. They don't call it brass for nothing! 180 gram double vinyl pressing from Mack Avenue Records.


    Musicians:

    - Christian McBride (bass, arranger, conductor)

    - Steve Wilson (alto sax, flute)

    - Todd Bashore (alto sax, flute)

    - Ron Blake (tenor, soprano sax, flute)

    - Todd Williams (tenor sax, flute)

    - Loren Schoenberg (tenor sax)

    - Carl Maraghi (baritone sax, bass clarinet)

    - Frank Green (trumpet)

    - Freddie Hendrix (trumpet)

    - Nicholas Payton (trumpet)

    - Nabate Isles (trumpet)

    - Steve Davis (trombone)

    - Michael Dease (trombone)

    - James Burton (trombone)

    - Douglas Purviance (bass trombone)

    - Xavier Davis (piano)

    - Ulysses Owens, Jr. (drums)

    - Melissa Walker (vocals)

    LP1
    1. Shake 'n Bake

    2. Broadway

    3. Brother Mister

    4. When I Fall In Love

    5. Science Fiction


    LP2
    1. The Shade of the Cedar Tree

    2. The More I See You

    3. I Should Care

    4. A Taste of Honey

    5. Bluesin' In Alphabet City

    6. In A Hurry

    Christian McBride Big Band
    $27.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Kansas City Suite: The Music Of Benny Carter (Pure Pleasure) Kansas City Suite: The Music Of Benny Carter (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Kansas City Suite: The Music Of Benny Carter (Pure Pleasure)

    A session from 1960 with Basie and his Orchestra on absolute top form. It's hardly surprising when you see the line up of star players and also the fact that every single selection was written by Benny Carter.



    The Kansas City that Count Basie found himself in had become the hard core of vital new jazz. It was a place where the musicians who expressed this new jazz could, from night through morning, and on again the next night, sit in on numerous jam sessions.It was a place where musicians like Walter Page, Benny Moten, Lester Young, Ben Webster, Andy Kirk, Coleman Hawkins and many more, could be found working, experimenting and living their music. This was Count Basie's Kansas City, and this is the Kansas City that Benny Carter has dedicated this music to. He has written an original modern jazz suite that is flavored with the elements of Kansas City stomp jazz, and tailored for the big brash sound of the Basie band of today. To Benny Carter, the different streets and places in Kansas City, where so many of these jazz greats lived and worked, and where so much of jazz history was written, evokes a mood, a rememberance of things past. He has, for this reason, titled the selections of this suite after these very same streets and places. The Kansas City of the '20s and 30s is now a legend, and the music that saw it's beginnings there has since developed and moved into the mainstream of today's jazz. It has reached its full maturity and greatness in the music of Benny Carter, and through the dynamic force of the great Basie band!




    Musicians:



    • Sonny Cohn (trumpet)

    • Thad Jones (trumpet)

    • Henry Coker (trombone)

    • Benny Powell (trombone)

    • Marshall Royal (alto saxophone,clarinet)

    • Billy Mitcheel (tenor saxophone, clarinet)

    • Charles Fowlkes (bassoon, bass clarinet, flute)

    • Count Basie (piano)

    • Freddie Green (guitar)

    • Eddie Jones (bass)

    • Sonny Payne (drums)




    Recording: September 1960 at United Recorders, Los Angeles, by Wally Heider

    Production: Teddy Reig



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Vine Street Rumble
    2. Katy-Do
    3. Miss Missouri
    4. Jackson County Jubilee
    5. Sunset Glow
    6. The Wiggle Walk
    7. Meetin' Time
    8. Paseo Promenade
    9. Blue Five Jive
    10. Rompin' At The Reno
    Count Basie And His Orchestra
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bossa Nova and Blues Bossa Nova and Blues Quick View

    $24.99
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    Bossa Nova and Blues


    This Sundazed Mono Edition Reproduces The Original Artwork And Presents The Original 12-Song LP On 180 Gram Vinyl Mastered From The Original Analog Reels And Pressed At Record Technology Inc.


    One of the Three Kings of blues guitar along with B.B. and Albert, Texas-born Freddy (Freddie) King influenced everyone from Eric Clapton and Peter Green in the UK to Jerry Garcia and Stevie Ray Vaughan in the States. But even his staying up all night playing poker with Grand Funk wasn't enough to prevent his seminal King/Federal albums from staying out of print on vinyl for decades - until Sundazed came to the rescue. The reissue campaign that began with meticulously mastered editions of King classics Let's Hide Away and Dance Away with Freddy King, Freddy King Gives You a Bonanza of Instrumentals, and Freddy King Goes Surfin' continues with his rare 1963 offering, Bossa Nova and Blues. In the tradition of his surfing album, which wasn't really surf, Bossa Nova and Blues had no bossa nova - but the advertising was at least half true, and hey, there were two cuts that had "bossa nova" in the title. Though King was best known for blues instrumentals, "Bossa Nova Blues" and "The Bossa Nova Watusi Twist" (dig the dance craze threesome) were actually the only two instrumentals on an album otherwise dedicated to bluesy ballads. But of course, Freddie made it work - churning out bonafide classics like the karmic "Someday, After A While (You'll Be Sorry)" (later covered by John Mayall and the Blues Breakers on A Hard Road, also reissued on Sundazed mono LP), the emotive "The Welfare (Turns Its Back on You)," the soulful "It Hurts to Be In Love," and the more uptempo, New Orleans-flavored "You're Barkin' Up the Wrong Tree."

    1. (I'd Love To) Make Love To You
    2. You're Barkin' Up The Wrong Tree
    3. Look Ma, I'm Cryin'
    4. It Hurts To Be In Love
    5. You Walked In
    6. The Bossa Nova Watusi Twist
    7. Is My Baby Mad At Me
    8. Someday, After A While (You'll Be Sorry)
    9. One Hundred Years
    10. Bossa Nova Blues
    11. The Welfare (Turns Its Back on You)
    12. Walk Down That Aisle (Honey Chile)
    Freddy King
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Mono - Sealed Buy Now
  • A Hard Road (Awaiting Repress) A Hard Road (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $24.99
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    A Hard Road (Awaiting Repress)

    Mono Edition


    1967s A Hard Road proved to be every bit as powerful and innovative as its predecessor, thanks in large part to Mayalls discovery of Claptons equally brilliant replacement, Peter Green. A one-of-a-kind player with a highly distinctive sound, Green makes his instrumental presence felt throughout A Hard Road, while delivering compelling lead vocals on You Dont Love Me and The Same Way. With sterling support from bassist John McVie and drummer Aynsley Dunbar, the material here features such Mayall originals as Hit the Highway, Leaping Christine and the title track, along with standout interpretations of tunes by Freddie King, Elmore James and Willie Cobbs. The legendarily haunting Green-penned instrumental The Supernatural previews the guitarists groundbreaking work with the original incarnation of Fleetwood Mac, which he and fellow Bluesbreaker John McVie would form a few months later.


    From the pristine U.K. mono masters, with complete original artwork and photos.

    1. A Hard Road
    2. It's Over
    3. You Don't Love Me
    4. The Stumble
    5. Another Kind Of Love
    6. Hit The Highway
    7. Leaping Christine
    8. Dust My Blues
    9. There's Always Work
    10. The Same Way
    11. The Supernatural
    12. Top Of The Hill
    13. Someday After A While (You'll Be Sorry)
    14. Living Alone
    John Mayall
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Mono - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Porcupine Meat Porcupine Meat Quick View

    $25.99
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    Porcupine Meat

    Naming one's album after a song titled "Porcupine Meat" may seem a little unusual - unless, of course, you're Bobby Rush, who earned his first gold record in 1971 with a hit entitled "Chicken Heads." He elaborates on his recent composition: "If a lady won't treat me right, but she doesn't want anyone else to have me, that is hard to digest." Hence the lyric, "too fat to eat, too lean to throw away."


    Porcupine Meat is Rush's debut release for Rounder Records, and one of the best recordings of his astonishing 60-plus year career. The album is due out September 16, 2016.
    Rush estimates that he has cut over 300 songs since he first began making music. He has been honored with three Grammy nominations, as well as ten Blues Music Awards and 41 nominations. He was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 2006.


    Make no mistake: Rush is not your typical octogenarian. At age 82, he exudes the energy of a 20-year-old, on the road for more than 200 dates a year. His hectic tour schedule has earned him the affectionate title King of the Chitlin' Circuit. Rush has traveled the globe including Japan and Beirut. In 2007, he earned the distinction of being the first blues artist to play at the Great Wall of China. His renowned stage act features his famed shake dancers, who personify his funky blues and the ribald humor that he has cultivated during the course of his storied career.


    Born Emmet Ellis, Jr. in Homer, Louisiana, he adopted the stage name Bobby Rush out of respect for his father, a pastor. According to Rush, his parents never talked about the blues being the devil's music. "My daddy never told me to sing the blues, but he also didn't tell me to not sing the blues. I took that as a green light."


    Rush built his first guitar when he was a youngster. "I didn't know where to buy one, even if I had the money. I was a country boy," he says. After seeing a picture of a guitar in a magazine, he decided to make one by attaching the top wire of a broom to a wall and fretting it with a bottle. He also got some harmonica lessons from his father He eventually acquired a real guitar, and started playing in juke joints as a teenager, when his family briefly relocated to Little Rock, Arkansas. The fake moustache Rush wore made club owners believe he was old enough to gain entry into their establishments. While he was living in Little Rock, Rush's band, which featured Elmore James, had a residency at a nightspot called Jackrabbit.


    During the mid-1950s, Rush relocated to Chicago to pursue his musical career and make a better life for himself. It was there that he started to work with Earl Hooker, Luther Allison, and Freddie King, and sat in with many of his musical heroes, such as Howlin' Wolf, Muddy Waters, Jimmy Reed, Willie Dixon, and Little Walter. Rush eventually began leading his own band in the 1960s. He also started to craft his own distinct style of funky blues, and recorded a succession of singles for a various small labels. It wasn't until the early 1970s that Rush finally scored a hit with "Chicken Heads." More recordings followed, including an album for Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff's Philadelphia International Label.
    Rush relocated one final time, to Jackson, Miss. in the early 1980s. He was tired of the cold up north, and he realized that setting up his base of operations directly in the center of the South would make it easier to perform in nearby cities on weekends. More indie label recordings followed. Songs like "Sue, A Man Can Give (But He Sure Can't Take It)," "What's Good For The Goose Is Good For The Gander Too," and" I Ain't Studdin' You" became regional jukebox favorites in juke joints throughout the region, and many of those songs are still fan favorites that are an integral part of his live repertoire.


    Since 2003, Rush has self-released the majority of his work (including the critically acclaimed Folk Funk album) on his Deep Rush label, but recently, he came to the realization that having a bigger record company behind him would be beneficial. "I outgrew myself," he says. "I need someone to help in doing the things I can't do. When you are wearing all the hats, you can't be everywhere at once."


    Enter esteemed producer and two-time Grammy winner Scott Billington, Rounder Records' longtime VP of A&R. Billington first met Rush at a Recording Academy meeting 25 years ago, and they became fast friends. He has wanted to work with Rush ever since. "He is the most vital bluesman of his generation," says Billington. He continues, "There are many people who still don't know Bobby Rush, even though he is a hero in the parallel universe of the Chitlin' Circuit - fans stop him on the street in Memphis and Helena and Little Rock."


    Porcupine Meat will not only please Rush's older fans, but is likely to win over many new ones. Billington reflects, "We wanted to come up with something fresh, while staying 100% true to Bobby."


    The album was recorded in New Orleans, and Rush was pleased and proud to be given the opportunity to make an album in his home state for the very first time. His impassioned vocals and in-the-pocket harmonica playing are among the best performances of his career. Unlike most of his recent releases, these sessions only feature real instruments and no synthesizers. All of the rhythm tracks were cut live in the studio, often edited down from jams that on several occasions ran close to ten minutes.


    For the project, Billington assembled some of the best Louisiana musicians, including Shane Theriot, David Torkanowsky, Jeffrey "Jellybean" Alexander, Kirk Joseph, Cornell Williams, and others. Rush brought along his old friend and longtime collaborator, guitarist Vasti Jackson, who worked with Bobby and Scott on getting the songs ready for the studio. Guitar greats Dave Alvin, Keb' Mo', and Joe Bonamassa all make guest appearances on the album.


    Rush has always been a prolific and clever songwriter. The songs he penned for Porcupine Meat such as "Dress Too Short," "I Don't Want Nobody Hanging Around," "Me, Myself And I," "Nighttime Gardener," "It's Your Move," and the title selection, all equal or rival his best material. "Funk O' De Funk" delivers exactly what the title suggests and what Rush has always done the best, which is putting the funk into the blues. While "Got Me Accused" is inspired by events from Rush's own life, the lyrics tell an all-too-familiar tale about the rampant racial injustice that afflicts our society. Producer Billington and his wife Johnette Downing (the well known New Orleans songwriter and children's musician) co-wrote a couple of fine selections, "Catfish Stew" and "Snake In The Grass."


    Bobby Rush is the greatest bluesman currently performing. Porcupine Meat is a testament to his brilliance, which presents him at his very best, and doesn't try to be anything that he is not. "I just try to record good music and stories," he humbly states. With this recording, he has more than accomplished his goal, and has produced one of the finest contemporary blues albums in recent times.

    1. I Don't Want Nobody Hanging Around
    2. Porcupine Meat
    3. Got Me Accused
    4. Snake in the Grass
    5. Funk O' De Funk
    6. Me, Myself and I (feat. Joe Bonamassa)
    7. Catfish Stew
    8. It's Your Move (feat. Dave Alvin)
    9. Nighttime Gardener (feat. Keb Mo)
    10. I Think Your Dress Is Too Short
    11. Standing on Shaky Ground
    12. I'm Tired (Tangle Eye Mix)
    Bobby Rush
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Count Basie and the Kansas City 7 (Out Of Stock) Count Basie and the Kansas City 7 (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $49.99
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    Count Basie and the Kansas City 7 (Out Of Stock)

    Although for many fans the equation Count Basie = Big Band Jazz is quite undisputable, one has to agree that when one listens to these eight numbers: less is more when it comes to swing. Bob Thiele, Impulse producer, came to the conclusion that even with a meager budget a whole lot of music with a terrific sound could be squeezed into the grooves. As always, the great soloists of the Basie big band are on top form: first and foremost Frank Wess who demonstrates how rightly popular the flute is for its sound-coloring and as a solo instrument. Thad Jones on the trumpet is quite outstanding in all the numbers and is equally important as composer and arranger. The All American Rhythm Group Number 1 consisting of the Count, Freddie Green, Eddie Jones and Sonny Payne deliver one adrenaline-like thrill after another without ever neglecting the jazz beat. All in all this is an important LP from the Impulse label, whose quality is greatly enhanced by the transparent sound.


    Count Basie, piano, organ

    Eric Dixon, flute, tenor saxophone

    Frank Foster, clarinet, tenor saxophone

    Freddie Green, guitar

    Ed Jones, bass

    Thad Jones, trumpet

    Sonny Payne, drums

    Frank Wess, flute, tenor saxophone


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Oh Lady Be Good
    2. Secrets
    3. I Want a Little Girl
    4. Shoe Shine Boy
    5. Count's Place
    6. Senator Whitehead
    7. Tally Ho, Mr. Basie!
    8. What'cha Talkin?
    Count Basie
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl 45RPM LP - 2 LPs Sealed Temporarily out of stock
  • Genius + Soul = Jazz (200 Gram) (Out Of Stock) Genius + Soul = Jazz (200 Gram) (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Genius + Soul = Jazz (200 Gram) (Out Of Stock)

    Legendary Rudy Van Gelder Recording

    Cut From The Original Analog Masters - Tape Boxes Included Notes In Braille


    This is the second title in the Impulse catalog.


    Ray Charles was best known for his work in the idioms of R&B, rock 'n' roll and even successful forays into country. But he also recorded influential jazz albums, including the groundbreaking Genius + Soul = Jazz originally released in 1961. Recorded at the Van Gelder Studios in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, in late 1960, Genius + Soul = Jazz was produced by Creed Taylor and includes arrangements by Quincy Jones and Ralph Burns. Ray Charles played the organ with three vocals (I've Got News For You, I'm Gonna Move To The Outskirts Of Town and One Mint Julep) and band members included members of the Count Basie Orchestra: Thad Jones, Joe Newman, Billy Mitchell, Frank Wess, Freddie Green and Sonny Payne among others.


    The record ascended to the No. 4 spot on Billboard's pop album chart and spawned the very first singles on Impulse. I've Got News For You rose to No. 8 R&B and No. 66 on the Hot 100. In addition, Charles' version of One Mint Julep charted No. 1 R&B and No. 8 pop and his rendition of the blues standard I'm Gonna Move To The Outskirts Of Town reached No. 25 R&B and No. 84 pop.


    Although Basie himself does not appear on the album, the Count was a major model as Charles assembled a full-scale, working orchestra. Basie also influenced his use of organ in a jazz context, and Charles was happy to record at the Van Gelder studio, where Jimmy Smith had recorded his classic Blue Note albums. Truly, as Dick Katz wrote in his original January 1961 liner notes, The combination here of rare talent plus uncommon craftsmanship has produced a record that showcases the timeless quality an innate taste that is uniquely that of Ray Charles.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. From The Heart
    2. I've Got News For You
    3. Moanin'
    4. Let's Go
    5. One Mint Julep
    6. I'm Gonna Move To The Outskirts Of Town
    7. Stompin' Room Only
    8. Mister C
    9. Strike Up The Band
    10. Birth Of The Blues
    Ray Charles
    $34.99
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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