Vinyl. Our way of life since 2004 (877) 929-8729

VPI Dealer Authorized & Certified
Site Search
Menu Free shipping on domestic orders over $49.99! - We ship worldwide!
LP20 - 20% Off Vinyl
Home > Products for: '

Fela

'
  • 1
  • 2
Results per page:
  • Zayna Jumma (Discontinued) (On Sale) Zayna Jumma (Discontinued) (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $22.99 $18.16 Save $4.83 (21%)

    Buy Now
    x

    Zayna Jumma (Discontinued) (On Sale)

    LP version of Group Doueh's record Zayna Jumma. From the gorgeously cracked yet all-embracing opening drum roll of Zayna Jumma (the title track), it's evident this band is hell-bent on redefining the sound of its influences and in turn, shape the future sound of its surroundings. It's musical alchemy in its purest, most remarkable form, pushing at the boundaries of geographical divergence while simultaneously speaking to the shared resonances between Western rock rhythms and the pulse of the Saharan trance tradition. Since its inception, Group Doueh's ability to craft pop hooks from a foundation of saharoui roots music has been a manifestation of sheer song craft and innovation. The tracks on Zayna Jumma are a deeper excavation of the group's forged terrain: a collision of contemporary Afro-Saharan grooves balanced with the searing modalities of Doueh's desert origins, finally nuanced by the transcendental pop/rock/desert blues elements honed from gestating in the fringes of the Sahara desert. For the latest installment of this Dakhla family's musical dynasty, Doueh recruits his next eldest sons El Waar (synth) and Hamdan (drum kit), and wife Halima is augmented by three female back-up singers. The band keeps evolving and this album reveals its newest phase -- that of a formidable ROCK unit. The songs on this record were recorded in 2010 -- a busy year for Doueh, maintaining its day job as the go-to group of the Saharan wedding industry while still managing recording sessions and a tour with Tony Allen (Fela Kuti's long-time drummer). On the heels of this momentum, Zayna Jumma is released to coincide with the group's 2011 spring/summer tour of the UK, Europe and a first-ever U.S. tour. This band continues to redefine the musical landscape and keep listeners amazed and transfixed. It's the perfect ecstatic music for the impending apocalypse, a rogue sound rooted in the past and yet boldly harnessing the aural possibilities of the landscape ahead... go ahead and jump aboard. Recorded on location in Dakhla, West Sahara in 2010 by Hisham Mayet. Housed in a full-color heavy-duty gatefold tip-on jacket.
    1. Zayna Jumma
    2. Ishadlak Ya Khey
    3. Zaya Koum
    4. Met-Ha
    5. Jagwar Doueh
    6. Aziza
    7. Ana Lakweri
    8. Wazan Doueh
    Group Doueh
    $22.99 $18.16 Save $4.83 (21%)
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Beasts Of No Nation (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Stock) Beasts Of No Nation (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Stock) Quick View

    $24.99
    x

    Beasts Of No Nation (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Stock)

    Pressed On White Colored Vinyl

    Beasts Of No Nation, originally released in 1989, was an indictment of the corruption and repression in post-colonial Africa. The album, whose single track took up both sides of the vinyl LP, addressed a variety of targets, each of them, said Fela, guilty of enslaving Africans: the Nigerian regime, the South African apartheid regime of P.W. Botha, Britain's Margaret Thatcher, America's Ronald Reagan, and the ineffectual United Nations. In addition to being vilified in the lyrics, Botha, Thatcher and Reagan are among the political leaders portrayed as beasts and devils on the front sleeve.

    1. Beasts of No Nation (part 1)
    2. Beasts of No Nation (part 2)
    Fela Kuti
    $24.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING STOCK Buy Now
  • Alagbon Close (Colored Vinyl) (Pre-Order) Alagbon Close (Colored Vinyl) (Pre-Order) Quick View

    $24.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Alagbon Close (Colored Vinyl) (Pre-Order)

    Pressed On Gold Colored Vinyl

    Alagbon Close, originally released on the independent Jofabro label in 1974, marks the first full flowering of Afrobeat, as a music and as a principled political philosophy. Instrumentally, the album brings together the several signature elements of Fela's Afrobeat, which had not previously been molded into such a unified, finely-balanced form on record. Lyrically, it is a full-on confrontation with an enforcing power of the Nigerian state: Alagbon Close in Lagos was the headquarters of the Nigerian Criminal Investigation Department. Many of the musical elements which make Alagbon Close so compelling can be heard on earlier recordings, but on this album, Fela pulled them all together to devastating effect, in the process creating the classic Afrobeat paradigm.

    1. Alagbon Close
    2. I Know Get Eye For Back
    Fela Kuti
    $24.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed PRE-ORDER Buy Now
  • Na Poi (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Stock) Na Poi (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Stock) Quick View

    $24.99
    x

    Na Poi (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Stock)

    Pressed On Clear Vinyl

    Na Poi, originally released in 1972, was re-released in 1976. Another version was included on 1976's Yellow Fever. The title track was hugely controversial and was banned by the Nigerian Broadcasting Company on original release. In Yoruba, the expression literally means things will collide, and in the lyric Fela describes what men and women get up to in bed together in graphic detail.

    1. Na Poi (Part 1)
    2. No Poi (Part 2)
    3. You No Go Die....Unless
    Fela Kuti
    $24.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING STOCK Buy Now
  • Shakara Shakara Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Shakara

    Shakara is one of a clutch of early 1970s albums - also among them this box's Fela's London Scene and Afrodisiac - on which Fela's Afrobeat transitioned from foetal stage to something approaching full-grown form. Shakara (1971) includes three of mature Afrobeat's signature ingredients. There are two guitarists, rhythm guitarist Tutu Shoronmu and tenor guitarist Segun Edo. The pair's repetitive, interlocking riffs - part melody, part rhythm - play a similar role to the rhythm and mi-solo guitars used in contemporary Congolese rumba. Fela's Broken English lyrics extend his music's audience beyond Yoruba speakers and make his words understandable across Anglophone Africa. And female backing vocalists echo Fela's lead vocals in what was to become Afrobeat's trademark call-and-response pattern. On release, Shakara's B-side, "Lady," was jumped on by the Nigerian press as Fela's contribution to a "war between the sexes." "I want tell you about lady-o," Fela sang. "She go want take cigar before anybody, she go want make you open the door for am, she go want the man wash plate for her for kitchen, she want sit down for table before anybody." By contrast: "Africa woman, she know the man na master, she go cook for him, she go do anything for him .But lady no be so, lady na master." "Lady," like 1975's "Mattress," has been interpreted by some as "anti-women." It was certainly in conflict with European feminist thought. However the lyric is interpreted, Fela was arguing from the particular in order to highlight the general: the adoption of European social habits to the detriment of African culture. Fela would address African men in similar fashion in "Gentleman" in 1973, lampooning their adoption of European suits, shoes and ties - which caused them to "smell like shit" in the African heat - before returning to the women in 1976 in "Yellow Fever," a song about the fashion for skin whitening creams. "Shakara" is a mainly instrumental track, with a brief lyric, sung in Yoruba, warning against boasters and braggarts. Up-tempo, with a suitably turbulent horn arrangement, it includes strong solos from Fela on keyboards and the fearsome Igo Chico on tenor saxophone.
    1. Lady
    2. Shakara (Oloje)
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Confusion Confusion Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Confusion

    This epic Afrobeat album contains just one eponymous track clocking in at just over 25 minutes in length, and beginning with a mysterious and psychedelic musical interplay between Fela on organ and Tony Allen on drums. As the song takes on a righteously funky groove, Fela evokes the chaos of Lagos - the multitude of regional dialects, the gnarly traffic jams, the absence of a policeman to take charge - as a metaphor for the larger problems of post-colonial Nigeria.
    1. Confusion Pt. I
    2. Confusion Pt. II
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Expensive Shit Expensive Shit Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Expensive Shit

    Nigerian police, seeking to put down this independent-minded rascal, tried to plant a joint on Kuti during a gathering at his home. Wise to there plan, he quickly swallowed the joint, but the police then threw him in jail to produce the evidence from his faeces. He escaped charges with some wily plotting, and then produced this song mocking the police for wasting resources on hassling him instead of furthering justice in Nigeria. Opening brass rounds give way to interplay between Fela's narration about the episode and responses from his group of female singers.
    1. Expensive Shit
    2. Water No Get Enemy
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • African High Life African High Life Quick View

    $11.99
    Buy Now
    x

    African High Life

    This is a very enjoyable if not essential album of traditional African highlife music set to dance tempos. Fans of Count Ossie (or other Pan-African musics that predate an outright American R&B influence) should know what to expect here. In other words, it doesn't sound as modern as Fela Kuti, so it won't supply the kinds of grooves expected on most dancefloors. This is a more traditional music and, despite its Blue Note affiliation, it should be appreciated on its own terms.
    1. Tolani (African Love Song)
    2. Ise Oluwa (God's Work Is Indestructible)
    3. Follow Me To Africa
    4. Yaba E (Farewell)
    5. Jojolo (Look At This Beautiful Girl)
    6. Aiye Le (The Troubled World)
    Solomon Ilori
    $11.99
    Vinyl LP Reissue - Sealed Buy Now
  • Fela Live With Ginger Baker Fela Live With Ginger Baker Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Fela Live With Ginger Baker

    Originally recorded in 1971 and 1978 by Fela Kuti's band, Africa 70, with the addition of former Cream drummer Ginger Baker, this album contains 4 songs plus a bonus track 16-minute drum duet between Baker and Africa 70?s drummer Tony Allen recorded at the 1978 Berlin Jazz Festival.
    1. Let's Start
    2. Black Man's Cry
    3. Ye Ye De Smell
    4. Egbe Mi O (Carry Me I Want To Die)
    5. Ginger Baker and Tony Allen Drum Solo - live 1978 (Fela Kuti, Ginger Baker, Tony Allen)
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Red Hot + Fela Red Hot + Fela Quick View

    $22.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Red Hot + Fela


    18th In A Series Of Original Albums To Raise Money And Awareness In The Global Fight Against HIV/AIDS


    Fela Kuti lives on. Since his death in 1997, he's been transformed from musician's musician with a cult-like following to a worldwide musical icon. The last four years have seen the Broadway hit FELA! win Tony Awards and tour the world, Knitting Factory Records reissue the prolific Nigerian's back catalogue, and now, Red Hot.


    Red Hot is an AIDS awareness organization currently partnering with cross-genfre collaborators representing rock, hip-hop, Americana, and classical for a forthcoming album release of Fela Kuti compositions, Red Hot + Fela. The release includes classic Fela anthems like Lady recorded by tUnE-yArDs, Questlove, Angelique Kidjo, and Akua Naru, Zombie recorded by Spoek Mathambo, Cerebral Cortex, and Frown, and Trouble Sleep Yanga Wake Am recorded by My Morning Jacket, Merrill Garbus (from tUnE-yArDs), and Brittany Howard (from Alabama Shakes) and Sorrow, Tears & Blood reworked by the Kronos Quartet along with TV On The Radios' Kyp Malone and Tunde Adembimpe.

    1. Buy Africa - Baloji & L'Orchestre de la Katuba featuring Kuku
    2. Lady - tUnE-yArDs, Questlove, Angelique Kidjo + Akua Naru
    3. Yellow Fever - Spoek Mathambo + Zaki Ibrahim
    4. No Buredi - Nneka, Sinkane, Amayo + Superhuman Happiness
    5. Who No Know Go No - Just A Band + Childish Gambino
    6. Trouble Sleep Yanga Wake Am - My Morning Jacket w/ Merrill Garbus + Brittany Howard
    7. Sorrow Tears and Blood - TV on the Radio's Kyp Malone and Tunde Adebimpe, Kronos Quartet + Stuart Bogie
    8. ITT - Superhuman Happiness w/ Sahr Ngaujah, Abena Koomson + Rubblebucket
    9. Afrodisco Beat 2013 - Tony Allen, M1 + Baloji
    10. Gentleman - Just A Band, Bajah + Chance the Rapper
    11. Hi Life Time - GendEr Infinity
    12. Zombie - Spoek Mathambo + Cerebral Cortex + Frown
    13. Go Slow - King
    Various Artists
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Everything Scatter Everything Scatter Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Everything Scatter

    Everything Scatter, originally released in 1975, is one of several masterpieces from early in Fela's mid-1970s purple period. In three extraordinarily productive years, Fela released 23 albums of new material (or perhaps 25 such albums, for the historical records are imprecise).


    The purple period continued up to and immediately beyond the Nigerian army attack of 18 February 1977 which destroyed Fela's self-governing commune, Kalakuta Republic. By the time Everything Scatter was recorded, Fela had put all Afrobeat's key elements in place: the signature rhythms he had developed with drummer Tony Allen; edgy, jousting tenor and rhythm guitars; call and response vocals; fat horn arrangements and extended, jazz-based horn and keyboard solos; politically confrontational lyrics; and, crucially, the Broken English Fela adopted to take his message beyond Yoruba speakers.

    1. Everything Scatter
    2. Who No Know Go Know
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Everything Scatter (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Stock) Everything Scatter (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Stock) Quick View

    $24.99
    x

    Everything Scatter (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Stock)

    Pressed On Orange Colored Vinyl

    Everything Scatter, originally released in 1975, is one of several masterpieces from early in Fela's mid-1970s purple period. In three extraordinarily productive years, Fela released 23 albums of new material (or perhaps 25 such albums, for the historical records are imprecise). The purple period continued up to and immediately beyond the Nigerian army attack of 18 February 1977 which destroyed Fela's self-governing commune, Kalakuta Republic. By the time Everything Scatter was recorded, Fela had put all Afrobeat's key elements in place: the signature rhythms he had developed with drummer Tony Allen; edgy, jousting tenor and rhythm guitars; call and response vocals; fat horn arrangements and extended, jazz-based horn and keyboard solos; politically confrontational lyrics; and, crucially, the Broken English Fela adopted to take his message beyond Yoruba speakers.

    1. Everything Scatter
    2. Who No Know Go Know
    Fela Kuti
    $24.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING STOCK Buy Now
  • Roforofo Fight Roforofo Fight Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Roforofo Fight

    By 1972, when Music Of Fela: Roforofo Fight was originally released (on two vinyl albums, Music Of Fela Volume One and Volume Two), Fela was becoming one of the most avidly followed musicians in West Africa. His audience came from among the region's urban poor, the "sufferheads" living in the shanty towns around the major cities, along with growing numbers of students and political dissenters.


    Fela championed, and sang about the problems of, oppressed and exploited people and denounced the ruling elites lording it over them, with their seemingly endemic corruption and their ready use of violence to crush dissent - and because he generally sang in Broken English rather than Yoruba, and adopted an increasingly pan-Africanist outlook, his message resonated throughout Anglophone Africa.

    1. Roforofo Fight
    2. Go Slow
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Roforofo Fight (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Stock) Roforofo Fight (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Stock) Quick View

    $24.99
    x

    Roforofo Fight (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Stock)

    Pressed On Red Colored Vinyl

    By 1972, when Music Of Fela: Roforofo Fight was originally released (on two vinyl albums, Music Of Fela Volume One and Volume Two), Fela was becoming one of the most avidly followed musicians in West Africa. His audience came from among the region's urban poor, the sufferheads living in the shanty towns around the major cities, along with growing numbers of students and political dissenters. Fela championed, and sang about the problems of, oppressed and exploited people and denounced the ruling elites lording it over them, with their seemingly endemic corruption and their ready use of violence to crush dissent - and because he generally sang in Broken English rather than Yoruba, and adopted an increasingly pan-Africanist outlook, his message resonated throughout Anglophone Africa.

    1. Roforofo Fight
    2. Go Slow
    Fela Kuti
    $24.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING STOCK Buy Now
  • Upside Down Upside Down Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Upside Down

    Upside Down and Zombie, both released in 1976, were made at the mid-point of an extraordinary three-year purple period during which Fela recorded 24 albums of new material. Upside Down is unusual in that it includes a second lead vocalist, Fela's American friend Sandra Izsadore, who he'd known since touring the US in 1969. Fela went through some important changes during the tour. The most far-reaching of these followed his befriending of Izsadore, a black rights activist who introduced him to the writings of Malcolm X, Angela Davis, Rap Brown, Stokely Carmichael, Huey Newton and other revolutionary thinkers. Fela later credited Izsadore with helping inspire his philosophy of Blackism. Izsadore was one of two women who played key roles in firing Fela's political awareness. The other was his mother, Funmilayo Ransome Kuti. A friend of independent Ghana's founding president, Kwame Nkrumah, she had been an early champion of Nigerian women's rights and a prominent campaigner for Nigerian independence. In 1970, Izsadore stayed with Fela in Nigeria for six months, and returned for a shorter visit in 1976, when she sang on the title track of Upside Down. Izsadore is a competent vocalist, but, her presence aside, the main interest is in the lyrics, in which Fela observes that much in Nigerian civic society is a shambles: "head for down, yansch for up" (head down, arse up). "Go Slow" was one of several songs Fela recorded which critiqued the consequences of over-rapid urbanization - in this case, traffic jams - using them as a metaphor to describe deeper social breakdowns.
    1. Upside Down
    2. Go Slow
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Afrodisiac Afrodisiac Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Afrodisiac

    The best known song on 1973's Afrodisiac is "Jeun Ko Ku," a satire about gluttony and Fela's first major hit in West Africa. In Broken English, the title means "chop and quench," which, in turn, means "eat and die" in Standard English. Lyrically, the standout track is the closing "Je'Nwi Temi" ("don't gag me"), a critique of the Nigerian political/military establishment and a defence of free speech. Fela vows that he will always tell it like it is, no matter what. This proved to be prophetic stuff, given the police and army assaults, intended to silence him, which were just around the corner. "Alu Jon Jonki Jon" draws on the interaction between animals and humans that is part of Yoruba mythology, in a tale about a dog who betrays his friends. Like many of Fela's lyrics of the period, the lyric employs parable and metaphor to encourage ethical conduct in everyday life. In "Eko Ile," Fela sings that there is no place like home (Eko was the pre-colonial name of Lagos). Afrodisiac was recorded at EMI's Abbey Road studios in London. According to the original sleeve credits, the album was produced by Jeff Jarratt. Fela only infrequently employed outside producers on his albums. Sometimes the results were excellent: British dub master Dennis Bovell's Live In Amsterdam (1983); Ginger Baker's psychedelia-tinged He Miss Road (1975); and Wally Badarou's Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense (1986). On another occasion it was spectacularly bad: Bill Laswell's remix and overdubbing of Army Arrangement (1985), made while Fela was in jail in 1984 on currency smuggling charges. Friends smuggled a cassette of Laswell's version into Fela. Listening to it, he said later, was "worse than being in prison.' On Afrodisiac, Jeff Jarratt was clearly working under Fela's close direction. The sound is classic Africa 70: punchy, raw, "live in the studio."
    1. Alu Jon Jonki
    2. Jeun Ko Ku (Chop 'n Quench)
    3. Eko Ile
    4. Je'nwi Temi (Don't Gag Me)
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • London Scene London Scene Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    London Scene

    Fela's London Scene, released in 1972, is another top-notch affair, made with a smaller band but one that punches above its weight. There is no tenor guitarist and no call-and-response choir, though sing-along vocals are a feature of "Egbe Mi O" ("please carry me"). Throughout, Fela's electric piano is gym-ripped and razor sharp, and Igo Chico turns in three stirring tenor solos. "Buy Africa," written in 1970, was one of Fela's first politically-informed songs. The lyric was written in support of a government campaign to encourage local industry. At this point, Fela remained open to accommodation with the state, on occasions when he deemed it to be in the Nigerian and pan-African interest. He even invited government sponsorship for "Buy Africa," but was rudely rebuffed by the politician he approached with the idea. The incident proved to be an important moment in shaping Fela's future relationship with the authorities. From 1972, he would no longer release accommodationist songs. From there on in, he would identify the status quo as the fundamental problem-a problem that could not be solved by government campaigns, but only by the complete overhaul, if not overthrow, of the government itself. "J'Ehin J'Ehin" ("eat teeth eat teeth") is along similar lyric lines as "Shakara." This time Fela is lampooning people who are so greedy that they eat their own teeth. (A more amiable Yoruba expression describes people who are so hungry that once they have finished their food they eat the plate). In "Who're You," Fela channels James Brown's vocal style over an angular funk groove. "Fight To Finish" draws on Yoruba folklore to offer advice: once you have started something, be prepared to finish it.
    1. J'Ehin-J'Ehin
    2. Egbe Mio
    3. Who're You
    4. Buy Africa
    5. Fight to Finish
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I.T.T. I.T.T. Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    I.T.T.

    I.T.T. International Thief Thief (1980) was recorded following Afrika 70's disintegration and the formation of Egypt 80. It is one of a quartet of courageous 1979/80 albums completed by V.I.P. (Vagabonds In Power), Authority Stealing and Coffin For Head Of State. After drummer Tony Allen, who had been with Fela since 1964, quit Afrika 70 in autumn 1978, baritone saxophonist Lekan Animashaun, who had joined Fela in 1965, became Fela's new band, Egypt 80's bandleader. Animashaun is credited as bandleader on I.T.T., which is really an Egypt 80 album even though the band's name is given as Afrika 70 on the sleeve. In "International Thief Thief ," Fela makes highly insulting, personal attacks on former Nigerian president General Obasanjo, and Moshood Abiola, the local chief executive of the multi-national corporations Internal Telephone & Telegraph (ITT) and Decca Records. Obasanjo Fela regarded as a crook, an incompetent and a thug, and held him responsible for the death of his mother following the 1977 sack of Kalakuta. Abiola, he believed, had both cheated him out of royalties and conspired with Decca's London bosses to silence him after the 1977 attack, in order to maintain favourable relations with Obasanjo's regime. Both men, Fela says, are "thieves," "rats" and of "low mentality." "Many foreign companies dey Africa," sings Fela, "carry all our money go, them get one style wey them dey use, them go pick one African man, a man with low mentality, them go give am million naira bread, to become of high position here, him go bribe some thousand naira bread, to become one useless chief, like rat they do them go do from corner corner, passee passee, under under, passee passee, inside inside, passee passee like Obasanjo and Abiola we are tired of carrying their shit." The backing chorus intermittently respond: "International Thief Thief!"
    1. I.T.T. (Part 1)
    2. I.T.T. (Part 2)
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Gentleman Gentleman Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Gentleman

    1973's Gentleman is the last of Fela's early 1970s transitional albums - it was followed by 1974's Alagbon Close, on which he brought all Afrobeat's signature ingredients together. On its title track, 1973's Gentleman presents one of Fela's most perfect lyrics, sung in call-and-response with the backing vocalists. "I no be gentleman at all," Fela sings, "Africa hot, I like am so; I know what to wear but my friend don't know; him put him socks him put him shoes; him put him pants him put him singlet; him put him trouser him put him shirt; him put him tie him put him coat; him come cover all with him hat; him be gentleman; him go sweat all over; him go faint right down .I no be gentleman at all-o; I be Africa man original." There's plenty more. As so often with Fela's songs, "Gentleman" can be interpreted literally or as metaphor concerning a wider issue. In this case, Fela's topic is the colonialism-induced inferiority complex which led many in Africa's new governing elites to reject African style, concepts of beauty and modes of behaviour in favour of European imports. It was a subject Fela returned to on 1976's Yellow Fever, whose title track attacked the craze for skin whitening creams among African women, and 1977's Johnny Just Drop, whose title track lampooned the social pretensions of Africans returning home after working or studying abroad. Gentleman's other tracks, "Fefe Naa Efe" and "Igbe," have briefer lyrics. On "Fefe Naa Efe," an Ashanti motto from Ghana, Fela tells a woman dumped by her boyfriend that she must get over the heartache and move on.
    1. Gentleman
    2. Fefe Naa Efe
    3. Igbe
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Fear Not For Man Fear Not For Man Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Fear Not For Man

    Fear Not For Man was one of the first albums to be released by Fela following the sacking of his Kalakuta Republic compound by 1,000 soldiers on 18 February 1977. Fela, along with many other Kalakuta residents, was brutally beaten; his mother, then aged 77, was thrown out of a window, fracturing a leg.


    The army set fire to the compound, destroying six Afrika 70 vehicles, all Fela's master tapes and band equipment, a four-track recording studio, and all the community members' personal belongings. It is doubtful, contrary to some sources, Fear Not For Man was recorded after the attack - doubt which is dispelled by neither the gruesome front sleeve design, showing blood flowing down Fela's face.


    His response came later, on albums such as Unknown Soldier (1979) and Coffin For Head Of State (1980); Fela's practice of no longer performing a song live once he had released it on record is the reason for the two/three year gap between the attack and the release of these albums.

    1. Fear Not For Man
    2. Palm Wine Sound (Instrumental)
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Zombie Zombie Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Zombie

    On the title track of 1976's Zombie, Fela and the backup singers ridicule the mindset of men in uniform over an urgent, quick-march accompaniment from Afrika 70. "Attention! Quick march! Slow march! Salute!" sings Fela, "Fall in! Fall out! Fall down! Go and kill! Go and die! Go and quench!" Each phrase is followed by the women singers' taunting response, "Zombie!" Just a few months later on 18 February, 1977, around 1,000 soldiers, most of them armed, swooped on the Kalakuta Republic. Fela was badly beaten, sustaining a fractured skull and several
    broken bones. His mother, then aged 77, was thrown out of a window, fracturing a leg and suffering deep trauma. The army then set fire to the compound and prevented the fire brigade reaching the area. The blaze gutted the premises, destroying six Afrika 70 vehicles, all Fela's master tapes and band equipment, a four-track recording studio, all the residents' belongings and, for good measure, the free medical clinic run by Fela's brother, Dr Beko Ransome Kuti (who was also severely beaten in the attack). The first journalists to arrive on the scene were assaulted by soldiers. Inquisitive passers-by were similarly set upon. The army didn't want any witnesses.
    1. Zombie
    2. Mister Follow Follow
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Na Poi Na Poi Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Na Poi

    Na Poi, originally released in 1972, was re-released in 1976. Another version was included on 1976's Yellow Fever. The title track was hugely controversial and was banned by the Nigerian Broadcasting Company on original release. In Yoruba, the expression literally means "things will collide," and in the lyric Fela describes what men and women get up to in bed together in graphic detail.
    1. Na Poi (Part 1)
    2. No Poi (Part 2)
    3. You No Go Die .Unless
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Alagbon Close Alagbon Close Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Alagbon Close

    Alagbon Close, originally released on the independent Jofabro label in 1974, marks the first full flowering of Afrobeat, as a music and as a principled political philosophy. Instrumentally, the album brings together the several signature elements of Fela's Afrobeat, which had not previously been moulded into such a unified, finely-balanced form on record. Lyrically, it is a full-on confrontation with an enforcing power of the Nigerian state: Alagbon Close in Lagos was the headquarters of the Nigerian Criminal Investigation Department. Many of the musical elements which make Alagbon Close so compelling can be heard on earlier recordings, but on this album, Fela pulled them all together to devastating effect, in the process creating the classic Afrobeat paradigm.
    1. Alagbon Close
    2. I Know Get Eye For Back
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sorrow, Tears And Blood Sorrow, Tears And Blood Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Sorrow, Tears And Blood

    Uprising of 1976 in which thousands of South African students protested the forced teaching of Afrikaans, the colonial language of Apartheid. During the uprising and the ensuing riots, hundreds of students were killed. The song calls out killings that have gone on in the name of authority and totalitarian rule as well as the instruments of repression of colonial Africa - the police and the army. In this way the song indirectly references the brutality that Fela and his family have experienced in the series of raids on his family compound, the Kalakuta Republic. The musical composition parallels the somber tone of the lyrics; focused and direct, the track avoids the bombastic funk of many of Fela's compositions.


    "Colonial Mentality" follows in the same manner, pointing out that those who wish to live in a post-colonial mentality are in essence living as slaves. Musically, the Africa 70 returns to a more funk and jazzy grooves while relaying a pertinent message to those who looked to Fela as a leader of the resistance.

    1. Opposite People
    2. Equalisation Of Trouser And Pant
    3. Sorrow Tears And Blood
    4. Colonial Mentality
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • 1
  • 2
Go to top