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  • Everybody Wants Some!! Soundtrack Everybody Wants Some!! Soundtrack Quick View

    $28.99
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    Everybody Wants Some!! Soundtrack

    The official soundtrack curated by the film's director Richard Linklater, featuring classic songs from Van Halen, The Cars, The Knack, and many more.


    Quote from Linklater: The Everybody Wants Some soundtrack tries to capture the amazing diversity of what was on the table musically at that time. So many artists were at the top of their game, and it seemed like a lot of popular genres were viable. Metal and R&B were as big as ever, disco was still hanging in there (although it would be 'dead' within a year or so), and, thanks to the movie Urban Cowboy, country was suddenly cool in places it hadn't been before. Even more exciting was the immediacy of punk and new wave, and the first examples of this thing you'd eventually know as hip-hop. Over the years some of this has been parodied and made to look ridiculous, but this movie is asking you to experience it as if for the first time - from those opening drum beats of 'My Sharona' to the utter newness of 'Rapper's Delight.'

    LP 1
    1. My Sharona - By The Knack
    2. Heart Of Glass - By Blondie
    3. Take Your Time (Do It Right) - By S.O.S. Band
    4. Heartbreaker - By Pat Benatar
    5. Every 1's A Winner - By Hot Chocolate
    6. Alternative Ulster - By Stiff Little Fingers
    7. Everybody Wants Some!! - By Van Halen
    8. Let's Get Serious - By Jermaine Jackson
    9. Pop Muzik - By M
    10. Because the Night - By Patti Smith Group
    11. I Want You To Want Me (Live) - By Cheap Trick
    12. Rough Boys - By Pete Townshend


    LP 2
    1. Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love - By Van Halen
    2. Bad Girls - By Donna Summer
    3. Hand In Hand - By Dire Straits
    4. Whip It - By Devo
    5. I'm Bad, I'm Nationwide - By ZZ Top
    6. Maybe I'm A Fool - By Eddie Money
    7. Romeo's Tune - By Steve Forbert
    8. Give Up The Funk (Tear The Roof Off The Sucker) - By Parliament
    9. Driver's Seat - By Sniff 'n' The Tears
    10. Cars - By Gary Numan
    11. Good Times Roll - By The Cars
    12. Rapper's Delight (Single Version) - By The Sugarhill Gang

    Various Artists
    $28.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Everybody Down Everybody Down Quick View

    $24.99
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    Everybody Down

    There's a strong, vibrant formal tradition in hip hop: the story rhyme. Rather than the bragging and boasting of many raps, in a story rhyme the MC presents a narrative-- a street update of Ovid or Homer if you want to get hifalutin about it. Traced back by some to The Message by Melle Mel, few would dispute that it reached some sort of a peak with Slick Rick's first album, and was carried forward by the likes of Biggie and Eminem. It also had a profound influence on rap in the UK, with artists like Roots Manuva using the form to represent themselves and their city in a myriad of new ways.
    1. Marshall Law
    2. The Truth
    3. Lonely Daze
    4. Chicken
    5. The Beigeness
    6. Theme From Becky
    7. Stink
    8. The Heist
    9. To The Victor The Spoils
    10. Circles
    11. A Hammer
    12. Happy End
    Kate Tempest
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Live At Wacken Live At Wacken Quick View

    $24.99
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    Live At Wacken

    Danko Jones, the band, stand and deliver crisp, catchy and crunchy hard rock with such exciting consistency that they have cultivated
    an equally loyal and consistently fervent fan base worldwide. Danko Jones, the frontman and guitarist, writes such irrepressible, hookladen-yet-crunchy
    electric tunes that it's impossible not to get sucked in by the alt-punk edge to his songs. The net result is a live
    performance driven by this power trio's sweat and electricity.



    Featuring their 18 song 2015 set, Live At Wacken provides fiery bursts
    of energy, quirky alternative riffery and Jones' own electric personality, one which has seen him become an independent
    commentator, spoken word artist and columnist for The Huffington Post.



    Live At Wacken will be followed by a busy 2016 as Danko Jones once again take their firebrand rock'n'roll revival on another world
    tour. Irrepressibly energetic, unflinchingly honest and engagingly addictive, Danko Jones never give anything less than 110% whether
    on stage, screen or stereo; unsurprisingly, everybody wants some!


    1. The Rules
    2. Play the Blues
    3. Sugar Chocolate
    4. The Twisting Knife
    5. Forget My Name
    6. Do You Wanna Rock
    7. Had Enough
    8. First Date
    9. Watch You Slide
    10. Full of Regret
    11. Code of the Road
    12. Legs
    13. Invisible
    14. Sugar High
    15. Cadillac
    16. Lovercall
    17. Gonna Be A Fight Tonight
    18. Bring on the Mountain (Become the Mountain)
    Danko Jones
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Tokyo Dome In Concert Tokyo Dome In Concert Quick View

    $79.99
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    Tokyo Dome In Concert

    Remastered Directly from the Analog Master Recordings by Chris Bellman


    Van Halen will release its first-ever live album to feature original singer David Lee Roth. Recorded on June 21, 2013 at the famed Tokyo Dome in Tokyo, Japan, TOKYO DOME LIVE IN CONCERT includes 23 songs, spanning all seven of the band's albums with Roth.


    TOKYO DOME LIVE IN CONCERT features an electrifying performance by singer David Lee Roth, guitarist Eddie Van Halen, drummer Alex Van Halen, and bassist Wolfgang Van Halen. Mixed by award-winning engineer and mixer Bob Clearmountain (Rolling Stones, Bruce Springsteen, Roxy Music, Nine Inch Nails, and many more), and mastered by Chris Bellman, the album features such classic anthems as "Dance The Night Away," "Beautiful Girls," "And The Cradle Will Rock " "Unchained," and "Everybody Wants Some!!" as well as blistering versions of "Tattoo," "She's The Woman," and "China Town" from the group's most recent studio album, A Different Kind of Truth.


    Mastering engineer Chris Bellman, who remastered the original albums for Bernie Grundman Studios, Hollywood, CA, was enlisted for these new versions. In order to produce the original sound the band intended, Bellman cut straight from the quarter-inch tapes for 180-gram vinyl.

    LP1
    1. Unchained
    2. Runnin' With The Devil
    3. She's The Woman
    4. I'm The One
    5. Tattoo
    6. Everybody Wants Some!!


    LP2
    1. Somebody Get Me A Doctor
    2. China Town
    3. Hear About It Later
    4. (Oh) Pretty Woman
    5. Drum Struck
    6. You Really Got Me


    LP3
    1. Dance The Night Away
    2. I'll Wait
    3. And The Cradle Will Rock...
    4. Hot For Teacher
    5. Women In Love...
    6. Romeo Delight


    LP4
    1. Mean Street
    2. Beautiful Girls
    3. Ice Cream Man
    4. Panama
    5. Eruption
    6. Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love
    7. Jump

    Van Halen
    $79.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 4 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Women And Children First (Remastered) Women And Children First (Remastered) Quick View

    $24.99
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    Women And Children First (Remastered)

    Remastered


    Van Halen's third record in as many years, Women and Children First doesn't surrender anything to its two famous predecessors. Eddie Van Halen, David Lee Roth, and company go for broke, amping up the energy and escalating the heaviness on a concise, hard-hitting 9-song set that also throws a few surprises into the mix.


    Anchored by the one-two punch of And the Cradle Will Rock and Everybody Wants Some!!, the 1980 release marks the first and only time the group employed a female vocalist, as Nicolette Larson sings on the chorus during Could This Be Magic? In addition, the opening track features a phase-shifter-effected Wurlitzer piano being played through a 100-watt Marshall amplifier, the change in instrumentation a hint of the ambition that was to come.


    Make no mistake: Women and Children First knows how to party hard, but there are also undercurrents of somber tension missing on the first two albums. Van Halen matures here and it's a welcome evolution, as confirmed by the power ballad In a Simple Rhyme and country-flavored Take Your Whiskey Home. But above all, this album rocks harder than any other VH effort.


    No, the bottle of hairspray and liter of Jack Daniel's aren't included with this killer reissue, but cue this meticulously pressed LP up on a good system, turn up the volume, and the good time pleasures forever associated with early Van Halen come rushing back! Guaranteed.


    Mastered from the original analog tapes and pressed at RTI, Rhino's new 180g LP brings brings the dynamics and punch of the fervent music into crystal-clear focus and also shines a spotlight on the group's trademarks: Roth's shuck-and-jive deliveries; Alex Van Halen's booming percussion; Michael Anthony's soulful bass; and of course, Eddie Van Halen's inimitable guitar heroics.


    Rock on!

    1. And The Cradle Will Rock...
    2. Everybody Wants Some!!
    3. Fools
    4. Romeo Delight
    5. Tora! Tora!
    6. Loss Of Control
    7. Take Your Whiskey Home
    8. Could This Be Magic?
    9. In A Simple Rhyme
    Van Halen
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Van Halen Deluxe Box Set Van Halen Deluxe Box Set Quick View

    $119.99
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    Van Halen Deluxe Box Set

    Remastered Directly from the Analog Master Recordings by Chris Bellman


    Van Halen will release its first-ever live album to feature original singer David Lee Roth. Recorded on June 21, 2013 at the famed Tokyo Dome in Tokyo, Japan, TOKYO DOME LIVE IN CONCERT includes 23 songs, spanning all seven of the band's albums with Roth.


    TOKYO DOME LIVE IN CONCERT features an electrifying performance by singer David Lee Roth, guitarist Eddie Van Halen, drummer Alex Van Halen, and bassist Wolfgang Van Halen. Mixed by award-winning engineer and mixer Bob Clearmountain (Rolling Stones, Bruce Springsteen, Roxy Music, Nine Inch Nails, and many more), and mastered by Chris Bellman, the album features such classic anthems as "Dance The Night Away," "Beautiful Girls," "And The Cradle Will Rock " "Unchained," and "Everybody Wants Some!!" as well as blistering versions of "Tattoo," "She's The Woman," and "China Town" from the group's most recent studio album, A Different Kind of Truth.


    Van Halen reinvented the sound of hard rock in 1978 with its influential and wildly successful eponymous debut album and then achieved even greater success six years later with 1984. Both albums would define a generation while selling more than 10 million copies each in the U.S. alone to earn diamond-certification from the RIAA. The band recently went back to the original analog tapes and remastered both of these landmark albums - Van Halen and 1984 - which are now also set for release on March 30, 2015 through Warner Bros. Records.


    Considered one of the greatest debut albums in rock history, Van Halen took the music world by storm in 1978 with an 11-song manifesto that features some of rock radio's most played songs of all time and scorching concert staples like "Runnin' With The Devil," "Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love," "Jamie's Cryin'," the band's signature cover of The Kinks' "You Really Got Me," and Eddie Van Halen's finger-tapping tour de force, "Eruption." Six years and five albums later, Van Halen had become one of the biggest bands in world around the release of 1984, which includes a number of the band's most legendary songs such as the #1 hit, "Jump," "Panama," and "Hot For Teacher."


    Mastering engineer Chris Bellman, who remastered the original albums for Bernie Grundman Studios, Hollywood, CA, was enlisted for these new versions. In order to produce the original sound the band intended, Bellman cut straight from the quarter-inch tapes for 180-gram vinyl.

    Van Halen
    1. Runnin' With The Devil
    2. Eruption
    3. You Really Got Me
    4. Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love
    5. I'm The One
    6. Jamie's Cryin'
    7. Atomic Punk
    8. Feel Your Love Tonight
    9. Little Dreamer
    10. Ice Cream Man
    11. On Fire


    1984
    1. 1984
    2. Jump
    3. Panama
    4. Top Jimmy
    5. Drop Dead Legs
    6. Hot For Teacher
    7. I'll Wait
    8. Girl Gone Bad
    9. House Of Pain


    Tokyo Dome Live
    LP1
    1. Unchained
    2. Runnin' With The Devil
    3. She's The Woman
    4. I'm The One
    5. Tattoo
    6. Everybody Wants Some!!


    LP2
    1. Somebody Get Me A Doctor
    2. China Town
    3. Hear About It Later
    4. (Oh) Pretty Woman
    5. Drum Struck
    6. You Really Got Me


    LP3
    1. Dance The Night Away
    2. I'll Wait
    3. And The Cradle Will Rock...
    4. Hot For Teacher
    5. Women In Love...
    6. Romeo Delight


    LP4
    1. Mean Street
    2. Beautiful Girls
    3. Ice Cream Man
    4. Panama
    5. Eruption
    6. Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love
    7. Jump

    Van Halen
    $119.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 6 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Scary Monsters & Nice Sprites EP Scary Monsters & Nice Sprites EP Quick View

    $20.99
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    Scary Monsters & Nice Sprites EP

    Previously the frontman for L.A. post-hardcore outfit From First to Last, Sonny Moore continues to develop his unforeseen dubstep tendencies with the second EP under his Skrillex alias, Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites. This surprising electro reinvention still throws a few bones to his previous metalhead crowd, with the virtually demonic basslines of Scatta, a blisteringly dirty 140-bpm anthem featuring the suitably breakneck-speed MC skills of U.K. grime collective Foreign Beggars, and the sinister lyrics of the Daft Punk-esque robotic rave of Kill EVERYBODY (I want to kill everybody in the world) just as unsettling as anything the two albums recorded with his former band had to offer.


    But perhaps inspired by the move to Deadmau5's Mau5trap label, its nine tracks present a more chilled-out, melodic, and even playful side to the eclectic producer. With You, Friends (an ambient reworking of the closing track to his My Name Is Skrillex EP) is a slow-burning epic that displays his penchant for chopped-up vocal samples amidst some lilting piano chords, swirling proggy electro riffs, and hypnotic house beats; All I Ask of You echoes the lush techno of his new boss, with its warm layered synths, ethereal vocals (courtesy of Penny), and Euro-trance hooks; while even the heavier moments are interspersed with lighter touches, such as the ingenious sample of YouTube sensation speedstackinggirl (Yes! Oh My Gosh) on the towering beats and distorted bass of the title track and the Space Invaders-style bleeps, helium vocals, and stadium rock handclaps on the chaotic electro-clash of Rock n' Roll (Will Take You to the Mountain).


    The three remixes from Noisia, Bare Noize, and Zedd are solid if unspectacular, with only the latter's chilled-out version of the title track providing anything wildly different from the originals. But the invention showcased on the first six bass-heavy anthems is more than enough to suggest that the U.S. has found someone who is capable of selling the dubstep sound back to its South London homeland.


    1. Rock N' Roll (Will Take You to the Mountain)
    2. Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites
    3. Kill Everybody
    4. All I Ask of You (Featuring Penny)
    5. Scatta (Featuring Bare Noize & Foreign Beggars)
    6. With Your Friends (Long Drive)
    7. Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites (Noisia Remix)
    8. Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites (Zedd Remix)
    9. Kill Everybody (Bare Noize Remix)
    Skrillex
    $20.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Hug Of Thunder Hug Of Thunder Quick View

    $25.99
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    Hug Of Thunder

    "I don't want to go out there being presumptuous," Kevin Drew says, "because, I've worn those presumptuous shoes before, and you don't want it to feel like, 'Oh, what a let-down.'" That's the fear when you bring back one of music's most beloved names seven years after their last album. But with Hug of Thunder, the fifth Broken Social Scene album, Drew and his bandmates have a right to feel presumptuous.

    They have that right because they have created one of 2017's most sparkling, multi-faceted albums. On Hug of Thunder the 15 members of Broken Social Scene - well, the 15 who play on the record, including returnees Leslie Feist and Emily Haines - refract their varying emotions, methods, and techniques into something that doesn't just equal their other albums, but surpasses them. It is righteous but warm, angry but loving, melodic but uncompromising. The title track on its own might just be the best thing you will hear all year - a song that will become as beloved as "Anthems For a Seventeen-Year-Old Girl" from their breakthrough album, You Forgot It In People.

    Its title, Drew says, captured what he wanted people to feel about the group's comeback, and how they sound playing together again: "It's just such a wonderful sentiment about us, coming in like a hug of thunder."

    Broken Social Scene had reconvened, in varying forms, several times over the past four years - the odd festival show here and there, preferably ones that involved the least possible traveling. But the idea that they might turn their hand to something more than greatest-hits sets had been stirring since November 2014, when producer Joe Chiccarelli told Drew the group needed to make a new album.

    "He started showing up at our label, asking if we were going to make an album," Drew recalls. "He just didn't give up; he just kept saying, 'You've got to strike, you've got to do this, the time is now,' and so finally we agreed."

    As might be expected to be the case with a many-headed hydra of a group, getting all the principals to agree wasn't easy. Drew's co-founder Brendan Canning was keen, but Drew and fellow BSS lifer Charles Spearin took more persuading. A turning point for Drew came with the Paris terror attacks of November 2015, which made him feel the world needed an injection of positivity: "It just sort of made us want to go out there and play. Because I think we've always been a band that's been a celebration."

    Canning picks up the story: "By autumn of 2015 we had started getting together and trying some ideas out, just getting back in that jam space, in Charles' garage. Then we set up shop in my living room and we were starting to come together in a very familiar kind of way, jamming in the living room, eating meals in the kitchen together, because that's what the band is about: 'Hey, let's all get on the same page and get the energies flowing in the same direction.'"

    Recording finally began in April 2016 at The Bathouse studio on the shores of Lake Ontario, with later sessions in Toronto and Montreal, before the group went right back to basics. "It was very beautiful the way that it ended in Charlie's little rehearsal garage space," Drew says, "after going to all these studios. We just worked there, doing backup vocals and handclaps and all the shit we used to do when we were younger." And then it was to Los Angeles, where the album was mixed.

    The result is a panoramic, expansive album, 53 minutes that manages to be both epic and intimate. In troubled times it offers a serotonin rush of positivity: "Stay Happy" lives up to its title, with huge surges of brass that sound like sunshine bursting through clouds. "Gonna Get Better" makes a promise that the album is determined to deliver. That's not to say it's an escapist record: Broken Social Scene is completely engaged, wholly focussed, and not ignoring the darkness that lurks outside. But there is no hectoring, no lecturing, but a recognition of the confusion and ambiguity of the world. As the title track closes with Leslie Feist murmuring "There was a military base across the street," the listener is caught in the division between the national security provided by national defense, and the menace of the same thing.

    The gestation of Hug of Thunder was no idyll. When You Forgot It in People made their name, Broken Social Scene were young men and women. Fifteen years on, they were adults in or on the cusp of middle age, and - as Drew puts it - "all the adult problems in the world were happening around us individually, whether it was divorce or cancer". Three members of the band lost their fathers while the album was being recorded, "and it seemed like the days of going in the studio, getting stoned, drinking five beers and saying, 'Who gives a fuck?' were over".

    Then there's the fact of the size of the ensemble, and the number of competing voices. "You don't always get the final say with Broken Social Scene," Canning says, with a certain degree of understatement. He compares the process of getting everyone to agree on a song to party politics: "It's like you're trying to get a bill passed through the House - you have to be really committed to wanting to win."

    But, still, if they were to return, it had to be with everybody, no matter if that meant things might get unwieldy. "I'd like to believe that Broken Social Scene can be whatever it can be," Canning says, "but I think the fact we'd gone away for so long meant we really, we really couldn't have done the same thing without everyone involved, you know?" The story of Broken Social Scene, he insists, was built on the involvement of everyone, and so if the story was to be continued, those same people had to return.

    "The thing that has changed is that the relationships between us are established," Drew suggests. "And in a family, you ebb and flow and you come and you go and you're in love and then you're annoyed - but it's established now, the relationships aren't going anywhere, you know? And I think through time, because we've been through so much together, personally and professionally, when we're all on stage, everybody knows what they're doing, everybody has a melody to back up someone else, you feel supported, you're a crew, there's nothing but protection all around you."

    Canning picks up the theme: "Before we were making this record, I said to everyone: 'We all basically want the same thing, we might just have slightly different roadmaps on how to get there. So how do we stray off on certain country roads but get back onto the main thoroughfare?'"

    That Broken Social Scene was a family again, driving along the same main road, became apparent to UK fans in September 2016, when the group - with Ariel Engle the latest woman to assume the role of co-lead vocalist - came over for less than a handful of festival shows, to test the waters. Their Sunday teatime appearance at End Of The Road - an ecstatic hour of maximalist music, physically and emotionally overwhelming - ended up being one of the biggest hits of the festival. It achieved what Drew has always felt music needed to do: it created transcendence, a pocket of time where everyone present was living only in the moment.

    "My 11-year-old nephew asked me, 'Uncle Kev, why do adults get drunk?' and I looked at him and thought, 'OK, brilliant question, I'm going to give a brilliant answer,'" Drew recalls. "And I looked at him for about 10 seconds and I said, 'Because they want to feel like you. Because they want to feel like a kid again, they want to forget everything, they want to be innocent.' We are built in a way now where you can't do that because you're walking around with the anti-transcendence box in your pocket, and in your hand, and in your home, and on your bedside table: it's the anti-transcendence. It's called your phone! And we're getting killed, we're getting killed!"

    So what do Broken Social Scene want listeners to take from Hug of Thunder? Canning wants it to make them "pause for the cause and maybe just leave things in your life alone for 53 minutes". For Drew, it's about what it's always been about: making the connection. "I just hope they understand that there's others out there, that they're not alone," he says. "I know that's silly! But you'd be surprised how many times I've had to tell people, 'Hey, you're not alone on this, you're not alone thinking these things.' I mean, with the title Hug of Thunder, I want to hold people. I want to fucking hold them. And when we do shows, I'm not: 'Look at me, I'm elevated up on the stage,' It's: 'We're here with you, this is us together.' Broken Social Scene is about the people, and it's always been about the people."

    1. Sol Luna
    2. Halfway Home
    3. Protest Song
    4. Skyline
    5. Stay Happy
    6. Vanity Pail Kids
    7. Hug of Thunder
    8. Towers and Masons
    9. Victim Lover
    10. Please Take Me With You
    11. Gonna Get Better
    12. Mouth Guards of the Apocalypse
    Broken Social Scene
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Holly Holly Quick View

    $18.99
    Buy Now
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    Holly

    Think music ain't what it used to be? Then you haven't heard Nick Waterhouse. His jumped-up take on 1950's rhythm 'n' blues is the real deal."
    - GQ


    A timeless talent for spirited rock and rhythms that anyone can appreciate.
    He draws from the classic sound of '50's American pop with a distinctive
    voice of his own, shouting and growling with infectious vigor."
    - NPR


    Waterhouse is definitely a star."
    - LA TIMES


    The music sounds like a party in full swing, each instrument playing exactly what is needed."
    - CHICAGO TRIBUNE


    Between the chattering keys, bomping saxes, gorgeous guitar tones and
    the bandleader's voice-which slides effortlessly from cool quaver to feral
    howl - the end result is undeniable."
    - SPIN


    Nick Waterhouse's art springs from a simple idea: everybody wants to be sombody else. One of his heroes, Van Morrison, got his start covering Bobby
    Bland, whose own musical idol was Nat "King" Cole. In Waterhouse's view,
    emulation is a journey; you never truly succeed, but as the singer, guitarist and songwriter puts it, "You become something on the way there."


    Nick was born in 1986 and grew up in Huntington Beach, known predominantly for
    UFC, commercial surf culture, and tanning salons. He established his musical sensibilities in the middle of the burgeoning southern California Psych-Garage scene (Burger
    records, Ty Segall, McHugh's Distillery studio) while retaining his unique perspective
    on the spirit of American Rhythm & Blues and Rock & Roll.


    Waterhouse started performing as a teenager. "It was really motivated by fear," he
    recalls. "I'm kind of an introvert, so it was an uncomfortable situation. It was a way
    to force a crisis." The young artist experienced an exhilaration he'd never felt before,
    and hasn't found anywhere else since. "It's a feeling of heightened awareness that goes
    beyond pleasure," Waterhouse explains. "It has something to do with seeing ahead in
    time and behind in time all at once. You don't just get the immediate reward; you get
    the potential that rewards you the same way."


    Waterhouse explored the idea of potential on his breakthrough single, "Some Place," a
    beautifully lean, propulsive track recorded at all-analog studio the Distillery and self
    released in 2010 on his own Pres label. "Well, there's someplace that I'd rather be,"
    Waterhouse sang in a fierce yet plaintive register. "And it's something that's been on my
    mind almost constantly."


    These days, Waterhouse is a successful recording artist, with one well-received LP and
    and several high-profile tours and collaborations to his name. But his latest work still
    embodies the struggle of his early forays. During "This Is a Game," Waterhouse sets up
    a snarly, post-surf guitar solo with a succinct statement of a cynical outlook: "This is a
    game / Please remember my words / And don't get upset when you don't get what you
    think you deserve." And on the gothic-soul strut "Let It Come Down," he meditates on
    the inevitability of pain. "If there's gonna be rain tonight," he sings in a stoic croon.
    "Let it come down."


    It's clear from this material that Waterhouse is in the midst of his own becoming. He
    isn't the type to let ecstasy take over, like Van Morrison, or to drawl away in a consummately laid-back register, like Mose Allison. In the tension between his wry lyrics and
    crisp arrangements, you hear the expression of a worldly skeptic who's also-when it
    comes to his art-a sanctified believer. Whoever it was that Nick Waterhouse wanted to
    be matters less now; these days, he just sounds like himself.

    1. High Tiding
    2. This Is A Game
    3. It no. 3
    4. Let It Come Down
    5. Sleepin' Pills
    6. Holly
    7. Dead Room
    8. Well It's Fine
    9. Ain't There Something Money Can't Buy
    10. Hands On The Clock
    Nick Waterhouse
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Kids In Love Kids In Love Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
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    Kids In Love

    Love is all you need. It's been said many times and many ways of course, but it's truer now than ever.


    When The Mowgli's first landed on the scene, their message of positivity and love resonated with audiences everywhere. The group's 2013 major label debut, Waiting for the Dawn [Photo Finish], debuted at #4 on the Billboard Heatseekers Chart and yielded the hit "San Francisco". Following its release, the seven-piece-Colin Louis Dieden [vocals, guitar], Katie Jayne Earl [vocals, percussion], Dave Appelbaum [keyboards], Josh Hogan [guitar, vocals], Matthew Di Panni [bass], Spencer Trent [guitar, vocals], and Andy Warren [drums]-performed on Jimmy Kimmel LIVE!, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, CONAN, Watch What Happens Live, and more. Between headline tours and runs supporting everybody from Walk The Moon to Manchester Orchestra, they even cut a song for the Relativity Media hit film Earth To Echo. Along the way, their interpretation of love became even clearer, and it defines their sophomore outing, Kids In Love.


    "Our first album essentially said, 'What's up everyone? We're The Mowgli's, and we believe love can change the world," explains Katie. "Over the past couple of years, we really came to terms with who we are as a band. With Kids In Love we're exploring the intricacies of love. It's such a broad concept. This time around, we get into intimate love, personal love, as well as universal love. We've found art is the best vehicle to ponder what this really means."


    "Before, the concept was painted in very broad strokes," Colin goes on. "Our intention was to start a movement and a culture around what we do. We put all of that under a microscope on this album and talked about personal experiences and stories, the lack of love, and finding it again."


    "We've learned so much about the business, ourselves, and this message," adds Josh. "We've become more direct. It's a little wiser."


    In order to properly convey that sentiment, the group teamed up with producer Tony Hoffer [The Kooks, Silversun Pickups, Fitz & The Tantrums] in his Los Angeles studio during the summer of 2014. With Hoffer at the helm, they fine-tuned their sound into an elegant amalgam of influences. Additionally, they recorded with prior collaborators Captain Cuts [Smallpools, Tove Lo] - a production team that includes Ryan Rabin of Grouplove, and worked with Matt Radosevich [Walk The Moon, One Direction] on two additional tracks. "We wanted to create songs that we knew we would enjoy playing live, songs we hoped that speak to people's personal experiences with love and life and loss and everything that comes with being a kid - or really anyone - in love," Katie explains.


    "We've been on tour incessantly, and this album was really written all over the country," Colin recalls. "It was composed in green rooms, hotels, parking lots, and everywhere in between. I went to Nashville for a week on a whim and tried to learn how to write country music. I was so lucky to work with some of the best in the business. I wanted to bring some of those storytelling elements into the music too. We really grew up, and the songs reflect that journey."


    The first released track "Through The Dark" builds from a shimmering acoustic guitar into an unshakable harmony between Josh and Colin. It shines its own kind of musical light.


    "Everybody goes through dark times," Josh asserts. "We're trying to put a positive spin on that though, and show you can get through that darkness no matter what."


    Colin continues, "In a weird way, it feels like the answer to Waiting for the Dawn. It's a hopeful and encouraging song."


    Then, there's the first single "I'm Good." It begins with a sun-soaked clean guitar and resounding percussion before snapping into a delightful refrain that's undeniably unforgettable. You'll feel good after one listen


    Elsewhere on the album, "Whatever Forever" is augmented by driving handclaps and a group chorus that proves infectious. Lyrically, it stemmed from some shared ink within the band. "Colin and I both got a tattoo of that phrase a few years ago in a hotel bar during Hurricane Sandy," smiles Josh. "We'd seen it on the wall of a bar, and it felt like the perfect new life motto. We're not worried about anything; we're just going for it."


    "That's a personal favorite," concurs Colin. "After one show, I had a girl walk up to me and say, 'I've been dealing with so much and hurting so badly. I adopted 'Whatever Forever' as my mantra. I needed that.' Sometimes, you need to distance yourself from what hurts."


    Ultimately, The Mowgli's open up their hearts once more, and the results are nothing short of inspiring. "We just want people to feel good," Katie concludes. "It's a domino effect. If someone leaves a show feeling great, maybe they pay it forward. If we can contribute a little bit of joy, companionship, and happiness, we're doing our part to make the world a little brighter."


    "I want them to feel inspired to do something positive," Josh agrees. "It's all about sharing that." Colin leaves off, "I want this to be a positive transformative experience. It's almost like falling in love. When you're in a good mood, you tend to react positively. I hope it adds more positivity and love to the world."

    1. You're Not Alone
    2. I'm Good
    3. Bad Dream
    4. What's Going On
    5. Through the Dark
    6. Whatever Forever
    7. Make It Right
    8. Love Me Anyway
    9. Shake Me Up
    10. Home To You
    11. Kids In Love
    12. Sunlight
    The Mowgli's
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Dad Country Dad Country Quick View

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    Dad Country

    Nashville songwriter Jonny Fritz's work ethic and boldness have paid off in spades. It's been a big year for Jonny with opening stints for Alabama Shakes, Deer Tick, Dawes, Shooter Jennings and kudos from CMT and Rolling Stone, among many others. He signed his deal this week (he actually signed the deal with gravy at Nashville landmark Arnold's Country Kitchen), and his third full-length album, Dad Country, is set for release on April 16, 2013.


    Produced by Jonny and Dawes' Taylor Goldsmith, recorded at Jackson Browne's Los Angeles studio and finished up in Music City, USA; this breakthrough album balances Jonny's trademark earthy humor and unfiltered worldview with some of his darkest material to date. Co-producer Goldsmith says, "Funny as they can be at moments, his songs access realities and experiences that we're all familiar with but sometimes fail to consider the depths of."
    While immersing himself in the music world, Jonny began running marathons from Philadelphia to Barcelona and pounding out his signature leather works - the dog collars and guitar straps - seen all over Nashville and half the musical universe. He found himself in NYC for year trying to save a relationship, and its slow, painful unraveling (and demise) inspired Dad Country's bleakest, heartrending tracks, including "All We Do Is Complain" and "Have You Ever Wanted to Die."


    These days, life has never been better for Jonny Fritz. He's back in Nashville again and putting down roots- and has even gone and bought himself a house. "It just keeps getting better. Now, the band is getting paid, I'm getting paid, everybody's happy, and we're packing 'em in when we play."
    "This is the dream life. I couldn't really ask for anything else."

    1. Goodbye Summer
    2. All We Do Is Complain
    3. Holy Water
    4. Social Climbers
    5. Ain't It Your Birthday
    6. Shut Up
    7. Wrong Crowd
    8. Have You Ever Wanted to Die
    9. Fever Dreams
    10. Trash Day
    11. Suck In Your Gut
    12. Instrumental
    Jonny Fritz
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Heaven Is Earth Heaven Is Earth Quick View

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    Heaven Is Earth

    Self Defense Family are one of the most prolific Punk bands out there today. Through countless releases and as many musical contributors (they have had more than ten active members at any given time), the collective has grown in both sound and vision.


    "Heaven Is Earth" was recorded at four classic indie/punk studios by a diverse group of engineers: Will Killingsworth at Dead Air Studios (Mind Eraser, etc), Kurt Ballou at God City Studios (Converge, etc), Mark Millar at Sone Lab (Dinosaur Jr, etc), and Jon Low at Miner Street Recordings (Kurt Vile, etc). Each engineer leaving their own distinct audio fingerprint on the collection of songs.


    Opener "In My Defense Self Me Defend" percussively wanders as warped guitars weave a pillow for Patrick Kindlon's introspective prose."Talia" introduces both piano and harmonica to the formula, all of it swirling and dancing around a throbbing bass line. "Ditko" exists in a similar sonic place as well, but utilizes textural guitars and subtle effects to set the pensive mood. It's not all sad clown music though. "Prison Ring" picks things up in the middle of the album with a Mekons like urgency. While "Everybody Wants a Prize for Feeling" welcomes a whimsical stomp akin to The Fall. These reluctantly upbeat songs lead to the title track "Heaven Is Earth". A song that descends with a delicate airiness while dealing out some of the heaviest moments of lyrical personal reflection. "Basic Skills" fills a similar space as well. A beautiful construct of a song, rich in melancholia but built on some of the most memorable melody ever from the band. Never leaving quietly, Self Defense Family then offer the closer "Dave Sim". Kicking the door open for one last high volume, pessimistic hurrah.

    1. In My Defense Self Me Defend
    2. Talia
    3. Prison Ring
    4. Ditko
    5. Everybody Wants A Prize For Feeling
    6. Heaven Is Earth
    7. Basic Skills
    8. Dave Sim
    Self Defense Family
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Friday Night Friday Night Quick View

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    Friday Night

    Includes Seven Tracks Not Previously Available


    Friday Night is a live album of performances from Will Butler's tour
    supporting his first album Policy. It was recorded mostly at Lincoln Hall in
    Chicago on June 4, 2015. Five of the songs are from Policy, two are songs
    written for the Guardian newspaper last year, and five are new.


    This record exists partly because I had a really good band, and I wanted to
    document it. Miles Arntzen (EMEFE, Antibalas) played drums (standing
    up at a full kit-he didn't use a hi-hat pedal, so he could stand on that leg
    while working the kick drum with the other). Julie Shore played synth bass.
    Sara Dobbs played synth leads and Mellotron pads. Everybody sang backing
    vocals.


    We started almost every show with "You Must Be Kidding." I thought the
    album should start in medias res to welcome the listener into a sweaty room
    with a tired, happy band and a loose crowd. So the album starts with the
    encore "Tell Me We're All Right" which was only ever played once, and this is
    the recording of it. We never soundchecked it. It wasn't even written yet (you
    might be able to tell). But Miles plays some magical fills, Sara and Julie jump
    in with good harmonies, and the crowd even begins a spontaneous call-and response
    at the end ("You're all right!").


    This record also exists because I wrote a lot of new songs and the band
    got good at playing them, and I wanted to put them out to the wider world.
    Sometimes an artist will take a new song into the studio and polish it until
    there's nothing left. I wanted these songs to avoid that fate.


    Think of this as a comedy record. In some ways literally-Brooklyn comedian
    Jo Firestone does the introduction and the "solo" in "Friday Night"-but
    also, it's an album based on working out ideas in a room full of people, playing
    off their energy and expectations. It's about taking complicated emotions
    and wringing communal joy from them, and then translating that joy onto
    record. So here you go!


    -Will Butler, March 2016

    1. Encore - Tell Me We're All Right
    2. Introduction
    3. You Must Be Kidding
    4. Sun Comes Up
    5. Madonna Can't Save Me Now
    6. Something's Coming
    7. Anna
    8. II
    9. Sing to Me
    10. Public Defender
    11. Take My Side
    12. Encore - Friday Night
    Will Butler
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Second Winter Second Winter Quick View

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    Second Winter

    In 1969, with several albums already under his belt in a short time like The Progressive Blues Experiment, Johnny Winter headed down south to Nashville and recorded what many believe to be one of his finest albums to date, Second Winter. The album features the original line up of Johnny Winter (vocals/guitars) Edgar Winter (keys and saxophone), Tommy Shannon (bass) and Uncle John Turner (drums). This power quartet laid down some of the finest rock and roll and blues performances ever caught in a studio setting, as well as forever etching the name superstar to Johnny Winters career.


    Always an avid audiophile and record collector himself, during the original recording sessions, Johnny believed that all the tracks would sound better if spread out over an extra side, instead of the traditional two sided LP, therefore creating the infamous and probably first three sided rock album in history! He summed it up perfectly We also really liked everything wed done and didnt want to leave any of the songs out. We couldnt honesty give you more, and we didnt want to give you less, so here is exactly what we did in Nashville, no more and no less.


    Its no secret that Friday Music has been championing this acclaimed world class artist for years now with his own authorized and top blues charting Live Bootleg Series projects, as well as classic vinyl re-releases from the Columbia and Capitol Records vaults. It is now with great pleasure they announe the continuing Johnny Winter 180 Gram Audiophile Vinyl Series with his phenomenal earth shaking Second Winter album. Mastered from the original Columbia Records tapes by Joe Reagoso and Kevin Gray at RTI, this incredible limited edition album comes full circle now in its first time audiophile vinyl domain release.


    All his greatest hits are here like Johnny B. Goode, Miss Ann, Fast Life Rider and of course his classic interpretation of Bob Dylans scorching Highway 61 Revisited. A visionary always with each and every one of his releases, Johnny Winter put his all into this album which showed an appreciation to his rock and roll heroes like Chuck Berry and Little Richard, his contemporaries like Bob Dylan, while also being a cultural icon in the psychedelic era solely with his Texan slide and unparalleled blues playing, an unforgettable rock voice, and a fan base that just keeps growing every day.


    Fellow legend and brother Edgar Winter and the rest of the band truly excel throughout this entire album as well, on tunes sweltering blues workouts like Memory Pain, I Hate Everybody and the incredible jam Hustled Down In Texas.


    Friday Music has also included the long out of print original gatefold album cover designed by Tony Lane, as well as the fine photography of Richard Avedon.

    LP1
    1. Memory Pain
    2. I'm Not Sure
    3. The Good Love
    4. Slippin And Slidin'
    5. Miss Ann
    6. Johnny B. Goode
    7. Highway 61 Revisited


    LP2
    1. I Love Everybody
    2. Hustled Down In Texas
    3. I Hate Everybody
    4. Fast Life Rider

    Johnny Winter
    $39.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Buy Now
  • El Rio El Rio Quick View

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    El Rio

    It's been one helluva ride to get here, from Nashville to El Paso and back again, but Frankie Ballard's new Warner Bros. Records/Warner Music Nashville album El Rio is finally being released. With growing anticipation, Ballard is especially excited to hear fans' reactions to some of the new music that no one has heard.


    Ballard has been playing new songs like "It All Started with a Beer" and "Cigarette" from his third LP live, but not every song has made it into the set. "Good as Gold," co-written by Mando Saenz and Justin Bogart, is a track he's especially proud of that fans haven't had a chance to listen to yet.


    "'Good as Gold' is the heart of this record," Ballard said. "Everybody asks, 'What's your favorite song?' I can't pick my favorite, but doggone it 'Good as Gold' is really close to the top. The spirit of this song, the courage in this song is what made me fall in love with it the first time I ever heard it. It's about telling a girl everything you need to tell her all in one moment and not holding anything back. The courage in that inspired me and I hope it inspires other people. It's one of the songs that I'm most excited to see what people think of it, on social media or at shows, or wherever I can talk to people about this album. I'm dying to get feedback. So go listen to the song if you haven't and tell me what you think."


    Love and lust play a huge role in El Rio, alternating between tender tracks like "Good as Gold" and "It All Started with a Beer" to more experiential songs like "Cigarette" and "LA Woman," another new song Ballard is excited to unveil.


    "This is one that I love to play for people because it's a rockin' song," Ballard said. "Every woman I think has a little bit of an LA side and I think every man has a side of him that wants an LA woman."

    1. El Camino
    2. Cigarette
    3. Waste Some Of Mine
    4. Little Bit Of Both
    5. L.A. Woman
    6. It All Started With A Beer
    7. Sweet Time
    8. Good As Gold
    9. Southern Side
    10. You'll Accomp'ny Me
    11. You Could've Loved Me
    Frankie Ballard
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress) The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

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    The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress)

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like "Death Rider," "The Beast Within," and "Raise The Dead" already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby "Blitz" Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.


    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.


    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. "It just makes sense for us," reflects D.D. "If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing "Grinder," the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work."


    "One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time," seconds Blitz. "Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics."


    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in "Come Heavy" and Iron Maiden in "The Long Road" and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.


    "Punk is huge for Overkill," confirms Verni. "And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world."


    Central to that premise is the incendiary "Let's All Go to Hades" which is sure to become a pit favourite. "This one was a hell of a lot of fun," says Blitz. "You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more."


    Adds D.D., "It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes."


    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is "Our Finest Hour." "It's about the recognition of sameness," explains Ellsworth. "I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune."


    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like "The Long Road." D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. "Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.


    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on "Our Finest Hour," is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.


    "I've had that kind of sound now for a long time," says Verni. "There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars."


    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. "Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds."


    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.


    "That's the strength of the band," explains Blitz. "Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization."


    And Ron? "He's one-of-a-kind," says Verni. "He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it."


    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.


    "I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.


    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.


    "For sure," says Blitz. "One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear."

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl)

    Pressed On Yellow And Black Vinyl

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like Death Rider, The Beast Within, and Raise The Dead already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby Blitz Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.

    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.

    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. It just makes sense for us, reflects D.D. If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing Grinder, the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work.

    One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time, seconds Blitz. Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics.

    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in Come Heavy and Iron Maiden in The Long Road and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.

    Punk is huge for Overkill, confirms Verni. And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world.

    Central to that premise is the incendiary Let's All Go to Hades which is sure to become a pit favourite. This one was a hell of a lot of fun, says Blitz. You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more.

    Adds D.D., It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes.

    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is Our Finest Hour. It's about the recognition of sameness, explains Ellsworth. I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune.

    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like The Long Road. D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.

    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on Our Finest Hour, is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.

    I've had that kind of sound now for a long time, says Verni. There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars.

    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds.

    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.

    That's the strength of the band, explains Blitz. Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization.

    And Ron? He's one-of-a-kind, says Verni. He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it.

    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.

    I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.

    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.

    For sure, says Blitz. One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear.

    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Stage Fright (On Sale) Stage Fright (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $34.99 $31.49 Save $3.50 (10%)

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    Stage Fright (On Sale)

    180 Gram Numbered, Limited Edition


    1970 Set an Organic, Iconic Rock Landmark - In Special Textured Finish Gatefold Jacket


    Record Shivers With Raw Emotions, Dark Confessionals, and Intense Singing


    Half-Speed Mastered from the Original Analog Tapes: Transcendent Sound


    A sharp stylistic and thematic detour away from its first two albums, the Band's Stage Fright is a compelling snapshot of a group coping with massive success and internal changes. Recorded in 1970 at the Woodstock Playhouse, the set shivers with raw emotions, dark confessionals, and intense singing. Largely devoid of the quintet's trademark all-for-one harmony vocals, Stage Fright is an utterly distinctive piece of the Band's catalog-and a historic landmark that's a necessary part of any music collection.


    "When Stage Fright came about, all I was doing was feeling my way along. But, where everybody was in a huddle on both Big Pink and The Band, with Stage Fright it didn't feel like we were all connected in the same kind of way. In this period of experimentation in life, in music, in drugs, people kept wanting to stretch and reach and go somewhere and try things and, in the course of that, some real alienation can take place as well. When these things are chemically induced, you can feel an incredible shutdown of communication." -guitarist Robbie Robertson, as told to Rob Bowman


    Such splintered camaraderie and personal demons appear in now-famous songs such as the title track, "The Shape I'm In," and "The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show." The music is rife with palpable tension, and as a credit to the Band's unique sound, absolutely singular. It's impossible to think of any other group playing these tunes. Robertson's balladic ode to his daughter, "All La Glory," featuring a gorgeous vocal turn from Levon Helm, provides a sunny contrast to the darker compositions.


    Circumstances behind the recording sessions also reflected the mood. While the Band had intended to capture the album in one take in front of a small crowd at the theater, the town residents vetoed the idea due to concerns over being inundated by too many visitors. Consequently, the Band played to an audience of no one, sometimes with the curtains closed and other times, with them open. Todd Rundgren, who engineered the album, couldn't even see what was going on-he was sitting in a canvas prop tent that became the control room, behind the theater.


    As always, Mobile Fidelity half-speed mastered this numbered limited-edition 180g LP from the original master tapes for a superior sonic experience. This analog edition of Stage Fright bursts with supreme tonal clarity and an airiness that brings the genius of Rundgren's preservation of high frequencies to complete realization. Even the fine textures of the hand drums on the stunning "Daniel and the Sacred Harp" come to light with microscopic detail. Perfectly blended, MoFi's Stage Fright takes its place as the most balanced and punchy record in the Band's oeuvre.


    Stage Fright is part of Mobile Fidelity's effort to present the Band's timeless music in the highest fidelity possible.


    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Strawberry Wine
    2. Sleeping
    3. Time to Kill

    4. Just Another Whistle Stop
    5. All La Glory
    6. The Shape I'm In
    7. The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show
    8. Daniel and the Sacred Harp
    9. Stage Fright

    10. The Rumor
    The Band
    $34.99 $31.49 Save $3.50 (10%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Full Circle Full Circle Quick View

    $23.99
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    Full Circle

    Legacy Recordings will release FULL CIRCLE, the first new studio album in over ten years from American music icon Loretta Lynn. Produced by Patsy Lynn Russell and John Carter Cash, and recorded at the Cash Cabin Studio in Hendersonville, Tennessee, FULL CIRCLE takes listeners on a journey through Loretta's musical story, from the Appalachian folk songs and gospel music she learned as a child, to new interpretations of her classic hits and country standards, to songs newly-written for the project.


    Drawing inspiration from personal memories and deep connections to American music, Lynn's 13 new recordings capture the essence of these songs in intimate new performances. FULL CIRCLE is Loretta's first album of new recordings since Van Lear Rose, her 2004 collaboration with Jack White, which took home a pair of Grammys including Best Country Album of the Year. It is also volume one of the Cash Cabin Recordings, a series of new album projects imagined and created at the Cash Cabin Studio in Hendersonville, Tennessee.


    Highlights from FULL CIRCLE include "Lay Me Down," a duet with Willie Nelson; "Everything It Takes," featuring guest vocals from Elvis Costello; "Whispering Sea," a new version of the first song Loretta ever wrote; and soulful new renditions of some of Lynn's classic tunes, including rousing renditions of "Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven" and "Fist City." The album also includes traditional Appalachian songs from Loretta's childhood such as "Black Jack David" and "I Never Will Marry." At 83 years old, Lynn's voice sounds as powerful as ever, and this new material only adds to her legend as a performer.


    Lynn struggled to balance family and her music career and is still going strong over 50 years later. Loretta Lynn has long been established as the undisputed Queen of Country Music, with more than 50 years of recording and touring to her name. A self-taught guitarist and songwriter, Lynn was one of the most distinctive performers in Nashville in the 1960s and 1970s. She shook up Nashville by writing her own songs, many of which tackled boundary-pushing topics drawn from her own life experiences as a wife and mother. "Coal Miner's Daughter," "Fist City" and "Don't Come Home A' Drinkin' (With Lovin' on Your Mind)" are just three of 16 country No. 1 singles.


    Lynn is also one of the most awarded musicians of all time. She has been inducted into more music Halls of Fame than any female recording artist, including The Country Music Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame, and was the first woman to be named the Country Music Association's Entertainer of the Year in 1972. Lynn received Kennedy Center Honors in 2003 and a Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013. She has won four Grammy Awards (including a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2010) and sold more than 45 million records worldwide.

    1. Whispering Sea Introduction
    2. Whispering Sea
    3. Secret Love
    4. Who's Gonna Miss Me?
    5. Black Jack David
    6. Everybody Wants To Go To Heaven
    7. Always On My Mind
    8. Wine Into Water
    9. In the Pines
    10. Band of Gold
    11. First City
    12. I Never Will Marry
    13. Everything It Takes
    14. Lay Me Down
    Loretta Lynn
    $23.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sorceress (Black Vinyl) Sorceress (Black Vinyl) Quick View

    $29.99
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    Sorceress (Black Vinyl)

    Pressed On Black Vinyl


    There are few bands that can or will match Sweden's Opeth. Since forming in the tiny Stockholm suburb of Bandhagen in 1990, the Swedes have eclipsed convention, defiantly crushed the odds, and, most importantly, crafted 12 stunningly beautiful, become one of the best bands on the planet; on album or on stage. Ask any Opeth fan. Enquire with any band that's shared the proverbial pine with the Swedes. Or, get a label representative to talk Opeth. They'll all tell you the same thing: Opeth are peerless. And they're only getting better.


    Opeth's new album, Sorceress, their first for Nuclear Blast via the band's imprint label Moderbolaget Records, is proof chief architect Mikael Åkerfeldt has a near-endless well of greatness inside. From the album's opener "Persephone" to "The Wilde Flowers" and "Strange Brew" to the album's counterpart title tracks "Sorceress" and "Sorceress II", Opeth's twelfth full-length is an unparalleled adventure, where visions cleverly and secretly change, colours mute as if weathered by time, and sounds challenge profoundly. Sorceress is, by definition, moored in Åkerfeldt's impressive record collection-his one true vice-but, as always, there's more invention than appropriation at play.


    "This time around I didn't think about what I wanted to do," Åkerfeldt reveals. "I was forced to write. But once I started, it was easy. This record, like the last record, didn't take long to write. Like five or six months. The thoughts behind this record developed as I was writing. The only thing I was thinking about with this record was to write that songs didn't musically connect. I made sure if I had a song that was new sounding for this record, I'd make the next song completely different. I think the songs are very different from one another. It's very diverse."


    Certainly, every Opeth record has had diversity. In 1995, Orchid reset the rules of death metal. Six years later, Blackwater Park hit the high note for musicality in a genre generally devoid of it. Damnation, in 2003, was the work of a band determined to upend the norm. Five years after that, Watershed closed Opeth's chapter on death metal by visiting its darkest corners and holding its native brutality aloft. And in 2014, Pale Communion officially bridged the progressive music gap by twisting the intrepid sounds of '60s, '70s, and '80s into contemporary brilliance. So, really, what's so different about Sorceress?


    "My music taste got a little wider," grins Åkerfeldt. "I started listening to jazz. I bought a lot of Coltrane records. I never really thought Coltrane would be for me because I like 'dinner jazz.' I like comfortable, soft, nice, and lovely jazz. Like Miles Davis' '50s stuff. Porgy and Bess, for example. I guess Dave Brubeck fits in there, too. So, that's the only new influx of musical inspiration for me. Other than that, I've been buying the same type of records I always have. Prog, symphonic rock, singer/songwriter, metal, hard rock But there wasn't anything that set me off like The Zombies or Scott Walker. Nothing got me going this time."


    Actually, that's not entirely true. Åkerfeldt's always mining for progressive gold. Good, rare music is particularly good at getting his motor running. He found double-gold in one-off Italian outfit Il Paese dei Balocchi and Bobak, Jons, Malone's ultra-obscure Motherlight album. To wit, get Åkerfeldt talking about either and he's all too pleased to discuss the finer points of Il Paese dei Balocchi's string-based darkness or how he fan-boyed Malone via email to get the famed British orchestrator and one-time Iron Maiden producer to contribute to Sorceress.


    "I absolutely love Il Paese dei Balocchi," Åkerfeldt professes. "They did one album. It's insanely good. It has everything I love about progressive rock in it. This album is so orchestrated and epic. It's got lots of string sections. It's very moody, dark, and sad. It's a mystery they didn't do any more. As for Will Malone, he did the strings and stuff for the Sabbath records-Sabotage and Never Say Die! But now he does strings for pop artists like Joss Stone, The Verve, Depeche Mode. I looked him up, mostly because he was the house engineer for Morgan Studios in the '60s. He was also in a few bands. Like Orange Bicycle and played on the Motherlight album. He also had a solo record, which is also amazing and superbly rare. It's orchestral. The bulk of it is strings. It's kind of like Nick Drake."


    Åkerfeldt's quick to point out, however, his newfound progressive music loves didn't directly inspire him to write Sorceress. The majority of the album was penned in Opeth's rehearsal space, where, nestled comfortably in a corner, a computer, a keyboard, and a microphone sit ready for the next Opeth epic. It isn't plush, but it's exactly the type of environment the frontman needs to focus his creative self into song.


    "When I'm in a writing mode, I have tunnel vision," says Åkerfeldt. "I have a really good work ethic. I go down to the studio everyday early in the morning and I work. I absolutely love it. It's so much fun. It's much easier now, too. I write complete demos. I sequence the songs in the order I want them to be on the record. I do mixing. I do overdubs. Once I'm done, I give copies to the guys so they can listen to the album. They practice to it on their own. When it's time to go into the studio, everybody does their own thing. It obviously works."


    For Sorceress, Opeth returned to Rockfield Studios in Wales, where the Swedes had tracked Pale Communion in 2014 with Tom Dalgety. The experience was so positive and historical-the countryside studio was also home to pivotal Budgie, Queen, Rush, Judas Priest, and Mike Oldfield recordings-there really was no other option for Opeth and crew. Rockfield Studios or bust! The studio, with Dalgety yet again in tow, provided the necessary isolation, the right bucolic atmosphere, the best gear, and three square meals a day for Sorceress to come out the other end spitting fire. All in 12 bittersweet days, too.


    "There was a time when I came out of our recordings a wreck," Åkerfeldt bemoans. "But now I come out with a wish. I wish it wouldn't have gone so quickly. There's emptiness after I leave the studio. I love writing and recording in the studio. It's lovely at Rockfield. It's in the sticks. It's got horses and cows. There's lots of sheep in Wales. But the studio is just a studio. It's so beautiful there. So quiet. It's a residential studio as well, so we live there while we're recording. We have chefs for us, too. So, we can just be there, playing, recording, and hanging out."


    If life is like a Peter Max poster, the lyrics to Sorceress aren't. There's color, but they've been treated, corrupted, and befouled. That is to say, they're much darker. Some of bleak lyrical tones stem from Åkerfeldt's personal life-and are thusly contorted beyond recognition-while others touch grimly on topics like love and what happens to people on the other side of it. In fact, some of the lyrical ideas are similar to what was happening on Blackwater Park.


    "I made sure to write good lyrics," Åkerfeldt laughs. "This sounds very old-fashioned black metal to say, but the lyrics are misanthropic. It's not a concept record, so there's no theme running through the record. Most of the record deals with love. The negative aspects of love. The jealously, the bitterness, the paranoia, and the mind games of love. So, it's a love record. Love songs. Love can be like a disease or a spell."


    Luckily, for Åkerfeldt and crew-bassist Martín MÉndez, drummer Martin Axenrot, guitarist Fredrik Åkesson, and keyboardist Joakim Svalberg-the lineup doesn't have to deal with Sorceress' main theme. They've been together since Heritage was completed, and according to Åkerfeldt he's not been in a better band situation before. Not since Orchid. Not since Still Life. Not since Ghost Reveries.


    "It's the best band situation I've ever had. Fans will look at our eras and have their favorite lineup, but this is the best. Even the happiest days of the first and second lineups aren't comparable to what I have now. We never fight. It's like a good work team. We know each other professionally and personally. As much as we're a band, we're also friends. We hang out when we're not doing Opeth."


    A core team is a good thing, when Opeth's credibility is in full view of fans and critics. Åkerfeldt's very aware of what the masses have had to say about Opeth since Watershed. While some disliked the musical shift on Heritage, most have applauded it. They've come to expect something new from Opeth. True to form, Sorceress will give long-time fans and weary critics reason to re-think Opeth and what it takes to be musically fearless.


    "I hope they'll like the record," posits Åkerfeldt. "I can only talk from my perspective and taste here, but we offer diversity that's not really present in the scene today. Whatever genre. We've always been a special band. We've gotten a lot of shit for being different. We still do. Our time will come, I think. It comes down to perseverance. It comes down to not giving up or giving in to public opinion. Music is about doing your own thing or going your own way."

    1. Persephone
    2. Sorceress
    3. The Wilde Flowers
    4. Will O The Wisp
    5. Chrysalis
    6. Sorceress 2
    7. The Seventh Sojourn
    8. Strange Brew
    9. A Fleeting Glance
    10. Era
    11. Persephone (Slight Return)
    12. The Ward
    13. Spring MCMLXXIV
    Opeth
    $29.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Option Paralysis (Red Vinyl) (Awaiting Repress) Option Paralysis (Red Vinyl) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $21.99
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    Option Paralysis (Red Vinyl) (Awaiting Repress)

    Pressed On Red Vinyl


    Limited Edition of 500 Copies


    Printed Dust Sleeve & Vinyl-Only Bonus Track


    At first glance, "Option Paralysis" seems like a highly inappropriate title to describe the constantly evolving output of THE DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN. But once you're faced with the cumulative power and vision of guitarist Ben Weinman, vocalist Greg Puciato, bassist Liam Wilson, guitarist Jeff Tuttle and new drummer Billy Rymer, you'll wonder-right after you pick yourself up off the floor-why more bands don't achieve similar force-of-nature status.


    "The title 'Option Paralysis' represents being in a situation where you have so many choices you can't decide, and end up being frozen," says founding member Weinman about the mindset permeating the band's fourth full-length album. "Back in the early days when I started to discover music, go to shows and find out about new bands, there were 'filters' from various circumstances - geography, economic status, etc - which deeply affected how a band sounded and what they stood for. Now, everyone is going through the same filter-namely computers and the internet-and everyone has the same circumstances: Everybody's seeing the same thing for the first time at the very same time, simultaneously all over the world. That very system is negatively affecting art and has created a situation where everything is influencing itself and art is not based on struggle, personal scarcity or unique and personal inspiration. This cultural revolutions is a big part of what determines our mission. We're not listening to any of the bands around us for some kind of input as to what we should sound like. At this point, we're using our own accomplishments as a measurement of what we need to do next."


    From their early days in the late-'90s as short-haired Rutgers, New Jersey, college students delivering hyper-complex thrash to audiences of boorish long-haired surly metalheads, to performing with NINE INCH NAILS on the pioneering electronic band's farewell shows, the DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN have merely one prerogative: to go forward in ALL directions simultaneously. Their groundbreaking 1999 debut full-length, "Calculating Infinity", is inarguably the essential technical-metal talisman for the 21st century, melding hardcore's blinding rage with a musical vision that made most progressive-rock bands sound positively lazy by comparison. "Irony Is A Dead Scene", the band's 2002 collaboration with Mike Patton, maintained their patented extremity while exploring electronic textures. The 2004 follow-up, "Miss Machine", (the first record to showcase frontman, Puciato) was a distillation of the band's work thus far, while including jaw-dropping flirtations with mainstream metal ("Unretrofied") that further enforced DILLINGER's desire-and ability-to take their music wherever the hell they wanted. 2007's "Ire Works" had the band finding inspiration from underground glitch and breakcore electronica, as well as indigenous music genres, in a world seemingly overrun with metalcore bores and screamo trend-hoppers. THE DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN's unerring sweat equity has consistently found resonance with listeners on both sides of the stages the band trod upon.


    "Option Paralysis" marks the beginning of another trajectory in the DEP mythology. After aligning themselves with the renowned Relapse label for most of their career, the band entered into a deal with the French label SEASON OF MIST to put out "Option Paralysis", tagging their new PARTY SMASHER INC label. "We signed a pretty traditional record deal with them for one record," explains Weinman. "What's exciting is that Michael [Berberian, SOM label founder] is a really big music fan and has a great understanding of how we operate. He was totally aware of the possibilities and limitations of working with a band like us-he's not expecting pop hits-and he's been extremely enthusiastic to dive right in and make it work for everyone."


    Produced by Steve Evetts, Dillinger's new music is positively abundant with possibilities. Drummer Billy Rymer, whom Weinman describes as "young and hungry," now occupies the engine room that powers the band. Frontman, Puciato has always had a knack with a bellow that could make reciting a grocery list seem like an exhortation to open the mouth of Hell. But feeling some of the lyrics on "Option Paralysis", you can't positively determine if the singer is handing down indictments ("Farewell, Mona Lisa") or feeling emotionally wounded. "This record is concept driven but there is still a very emotional and personal aspect to his lyrics," says Weinman soberly. "He's going through transitional stages in his life right now." Nothing so eloquently supports that statement than the six and-a-half-minute "Widower", where the band are joined by veteran David Bowie keyboardist Mike Garson for an aural excursion that incorporates piano-trio jazz, tender balladry and anthemic power. While there's no shortage of DEP plasma-balls on "Option Paralysis" ("Room Full Of Eyes", "Good Neighbor"), the band keep things fresh with the math-rock/free-jazz convergence of "I Wouldn't If You Didn't," the electro-tweaked "Chinese Whispers" and the closing "Parasitic Twins". The latter track sports lead vocals courtesy of guitarist Tuttle, as well as Beach Boys-styled harmonies and a major-key Weinman solo that's more Clapton (ca. Derek And The Dominos) than calculus crush. Clearly, this is not your older brother's DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN. "We're just trying to make music we can be stimulated by," says Weinman about the assorted directions and sonic vistas on "Option Paralysis". "We consider ourselves songwriters, which is kind of odd when you consider the kind of band most would consider us."


    As passionate about their craft as ever, DEP are looking to ramp up things even more in 2010, with a planet-beating touring campaign that includes basement shows, a stint on the main stage at this summer's Vans Warped Tour, a performance at the legendary Cochella festival, and various points in between. But after 12 years of deliberately challenging themselves, as well as the preconceived notions of critics and the strict genre-specific zealots of the world's underground music scenes, the big question remains: What is the mission of the DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN? It's a question Weinman addresses with equal parts melancholy, unwavering determination and humor. "I've been trying for a while to have someone explain that to me," he says, laughing. "Seriously, 'Option Paralysis' represents why we're here and why we're still making music. We started at a time when there wasn't all this access to the larger world. Our only goal was to make a small dent in the scene that we were in. The fact we've made it this far and that we're still relevant is really special to me. I feel that it is extremely important for bands like us to continue to represent the ethic and attitude that was present during a time that doesn't exist anymore."


    "That," he says, pausing to smile. "And I have to pay my mortgage somehow "

    1. Farewell, Mona Lisa
    2. Good Neighbor
    3. Gold Teeth on a Bum
    4. Crystal Morning
    5. Endless Endings
    6. Widower
    7. Room Full of Eyes
    8. Chinese Whispers
    9. I Wouldn't If You Didn't
    10. Parasitic Twins
    11. Chuck McChip (vinyl only bonus track)
    Dillinger Escape Plan
    $21.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Lovers And Leavers Lovers And Leavers Quick View

    $19.99
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    Lovers And Leavers

    I'm a singer-songwriter. I think "Lovers and Leavers" comes closer to reflecting that than any other record I've made. I didn't worry about checking boxes, making sure there was something here for everybody, or getting on the radio. I just took some much needed deep breaths and let them out on tape.


    It's been a while since my last album by some measurements of time. Not "history of the universe time", or "getting a bill through congress time", but in the lives of dogs and recording artists, five years and fifty-three days is only a little less than an eternity. I went through a divorce. I fell in love. Changes were made, realizations were realized, and life was lived.


    But, I kept on writing songs, on my own and with a cast of accomplished characters who combined their own stories and perspectives with mine. Songs about my friends. Songs about my son. Songs about beginnings and endings. Songs about songs. Songs about acceptance and regret. Songs about lovers and leavers.


    With these songs in hand, I needed a co-conspirator to help me get them to you. I called on Joe Henry, a gentleman poet and an elegant artist who seemed a trustworthy steward for my collection. We recorded this record live in five days, using just an acoustic guitar, a mix of bass, percussion, pianos and organs, and a touch of pedal steel.


    I didn't have one song that I knew would be a sing along or would make people dance. I felt vulnerable in a way that I hadn't in a long time. But I got what I wanted - a record with space, nuance, and room to breathe. It felt right for my art. It felt right for my life.


    "Lovers and Leavers" isn't funny or raucous. There are very few hoots and almost no hollers. But it is joyous, and it makes me smile. No, it's not my "Blood on the Tracks," nor is it any kind of opus. It's my fifth record - a reflection of a specific time and place. It is quiet, like I wanted it to be.


    Like I wanted to be.


    -Hayes Carll January 1, 2016 Austin, TX.

    1. Drive
    2. Sake of the Song
    3. Good While It Lasted
    4. You Leave Alone
    5. My Friends
    6. The Love That We Need
    7. Love Don't Let Me Down
    8. The Magic Kid
    9. Love Is So Easy
    10. Jealous Moon
    Hayes Carll
    $19.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Evil Divide (Awaiting Repress) The Evil Divide (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $25.99
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    The Evil Divide (Awaiting Repress)

    Three decades into their celebrated career, Death Angel remain as hungry as ever.


    As a result, uncompromising urgency and unpredictability define the Bay Area thrash quintet's eighth full-length album, The Evil Divide [Nuclear Blast]. The group-Mark Osegueda [vocals], Rob Cavestany [lead guitar], Ted Aguilar [guitar], Will Carroll [drums], and Damien Sisson [bass]-satiate the appetite for buzzsaw speed riffs, double bass mayhem, and scorching vocals over the course of ten new anthems.


    "I want every record of ours to always sound fucking hungry and desperate," declares Mark. "An injured animal is a dangerous fucking animal. We feel that. We're always striving for more and put everything into it until our bodies give out."


    "We know who we are," adds Rob. "We're dedicated to this sound for both the fans and ourselves."


    In order to siphon that energy, the group re-teamed with producer Jason Suecof [Trivium, Deicide] for the third album in a row. They traded Northern California for Suecof's Florida stronghold, Audio Hammer Studios, during two months in the fall of 2015. Following three consecutive records together, this lineup gelled more than ever while recording.


    "You could feel it," continues Rob. "Everything was so much smoother in all regards. We progressed as a unit, and we all got on the same page pretty quickly. It makes recording and playing even more fun."


    "We're collectively focused," says Mark. "Rob and I have grown a lot as songwriters, and the entire band is tighter than ever. We knew what to expect sonically with Jason, but we wanted to push things in a different direction. The production and drum, bass, and guitar tones are more organic. He's got such a great ear and nailed it. It's like we confidently hit our stride."


    The first single "Lost" intersects a hypnotically haunting refrain with a chugging percussive groove, dropping the melody like a guillotine between fret-burning leads.


    "Everybody feels lost at some point in their lives," explains Mark. "It's that sense of self-awareness or lack thereof that comes through in the lyrics. No one's immune to it. That time can be a fleeting week or a matter of years where you don't know what's going on. Music is a way to get it out and a vessel to vent. It's a universal thing." Opener "The Moth" whips from a galloping guitar death march into a battle-cry. Boasting a lyrical contribution from Rob, it name checks the album title in the chorus.


    "Mark really breathes life into what I wrote," says Rob. "We have a great time collaborating and bouncing ideas off each other."


    "The world is in such an odd state," sighs Mark. "There's always division, but these days it's wild. People are attacking each other for no reason. That's why I love metal. It's an amazing community, and people get into it for no other reason but the passion for music. It's the one thing we can retreat to."


    "Cause for Alarm" volleys between a crossfire of six-string prowess, while "Father of Lies" closes on a haunting acoustic outro, illuminating the music's expanse and declaring another creative victory for the group.


    The Evil Divide stands out as the culmination of thirty-plus years of music for Death Angel. It kicked off with legendary debut, The Ultra-Violence, in 1987. The classic Frolic Through The Park began to cement their legacy and even earned the distinction of landing on Loudwire's list of the "Top Ten Thrash Albums NOT Released by The Big 4." The group broke up following 1990's Act III only to reunite in 2004 on Art of Dying for the next generation. A powerful trifecta followed. In 2010, Relentless Retribution boasted a cameo from virtuosos Rodrigo y Gabriela, while 2013's The Dream Calls For Blood bowed at #72 on the Billboard Top 200, selling 5,400 copies first-week and earning the group's first-ever entry onto that respective chart. Beyond continued public praise from the likes of James Hetfield of Metallica and Robb Flynn of Machine Head, the band's music has popped up everywhere from Carl's Jr. commercials to Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III. Their fire burns brighter than ever in 2016.


    "If you're a casual fan, I hope you really get it on this album," Mark leaves off. "If you've been with us since the beginning, I want you to see we aren't messing around. We're still Death Angel."

    1. The Moth
    2. Cause For Alarm
    3. Lost
    4. Father Of Lies
    5. Hell To Pay
    6. It Can't Be This
    7. Hatred United, United Hate
    8. Breakaway
    9. The Electric Cell
    10. Let The Pieces Fall
    Bonus:
    11. Wasteland
    Death Angel
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP -2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
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