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Duke Ellington Masterpieces

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  • Masterpieces (45 RPM) Masterpieces (45 RPM) Quick View

    $54.99
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    Masterpieces (45 RPM)


    A Historic Record - Recorded Just Four Years Removed From The Dawn Of The Analog Tape Era!


    Remastered By Ryan Smith At Sterling Sound From The Original Analog Tapes


    Recorded On An Ampex 200, Using 3M-111 Magnetic Tape Running At 15 Inches Per Second


    Gatefold Old-School Tip-on On Jacket By Stoughton Printing Plated And Pressed At Quality Record Pressings!


    Named A 2015 Record To Die For By Stereophile Magazine.


    Remastered by Ryan Smith at Sterling Sound from the original analog tapes, the record was plated and pressed at Quality Record Pressings. The depth and space when those rich chromatic harmonies create a wide and well-defined soundscape, the timbre of the orchestra as a whole as well as individual instruments, and the thick, wooden sound of Wendell Marshall's bass are among the aural pleasures provided when you drop a needle on this platter; expect goose bumps. - Music = 5/5; Sonics = 4.5/5 - Jeff Wilson, The Absolute Sound, May-June 2015.


    I chose the CD reissue of this album as one of my R2D4s for 2012, but now from Chad Kassem's Analogue Productions comes this QRP LP, and it's an occasion for popping corks. Released in 1950, this was Ellington's first LP, and he used the new medium to stretch out four of his biggest hits. The arrangements are jaw-droppingly gorgeous and the sound just slightly less so. Recorded by Fred Plaut, who later miked Kind of Blue and other Columbia classics, it has the dynamics, depth, and in-your-face tonal realism of a modern (mono) audiophile thumper. Among the best jazz albums ever. - Fred Kaplan, for Stereophile - Records To Die For - February 2015.


    This new re-issue slays my vintage copy in every way. Every dimension of the recording was much better...dynamics, harmonics, frequency response, detail, jump...all just leaped out at me! The recording sounded like it had been made that morning...absolutely fresh-sounding. No veiling. No roll-off. In fact, it's so good that it doesn't matter that this is a mono recording! Listen to it on a great turntable...you'll hear mono that fools you into thinking that it's not mono. Just wait until you hear Yvonne Lanauze sing, Mood Indigo amigos, after a long instrumental build-up...she'll take you there! ... The pressing itself was impeccable: flat, and free of noise, tics and pops...a genuine masterpiece of the pressing-plant arts. The Hyperion OCL, the finest cartridge that I've ever heard, revealed how superbly these grooves were carved! Commendable, reference-grade analog...very, very close to master tape sound. Very damned close! Kissing cousins close! Hell, maybe even closer than that. In fact, I now consider the Analogue Productions re-issue of Masterpieces by Ellington to be one of the very finest Jazz records ever released. (Sorry Miles! Move over, Kind of Blue!). - David W. Robinson, editor-in-chief, Positive Feedback Online.


    Most highly recommended (the record is now on the QRP presses). It's one of my 'Records to Die For' in the February 2015 Stereophile. A true classic both musically and sonically and a historical work of art you can now own. - Music = 11/11; Sound = 11/11 - Michael Fremer, AnalogPlanet.com.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    LP 1
    1. Mood Indigo
    2. Sophisticated Lady


    LP 2
    1. The Tattooed Bride
    2. Solitude

    Duke Ellington
    $54.99
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP 45 RPM - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Masterpieces By Ellington Masterpieces By Ellington Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
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    Masterpieces By Ellington

    A Historic Record - Recorded Just Four Years Removed From The Dawn Of The Analog Tape Era!


    Remastered By Ryan Smith At Sterling Sound From The Original Analog Tapes


    Recorded On An Ampex 200, Using 3M-111 Magnetic Tape Running At 15 Inches Per Second


    Gatefold Old-School Tip-On On Jacket By Stoughton Printing


    Plated And Pressed At Quality Record Pressings


    Most highly recommended (the record is now on the QRP presses). It's one of my 'Records to Die For' in the February 2015 Stereophile. You won't have to die to get a copy. $30 will do and it's well worth the money. A true classic both musically and sonically and a historical work of art you can now own. - Music = 11/11; Sound = 11/11 - Michael Fremer, AnalogPlanet.com


    Masterpieces By Ellington shines from an astonishingly brief period of history that gave the recording industry two of its greatest achievements - the introduction of magnetic tape recording and the 33 1/3 LP, or long-playing record.


    Four years. That's all it took to go from the discovery by Americans, of German advancements in the field of sound recording, to the marketing of tape decks in the U.S. by the Ampex company, to Columbia's unveiling of its 12" LP, and the first long-playing record to be sold to consumers.


    The four selections contained here catapulted the Maestro Ellington into the LP era, as the great composer/arranger/pianist and his matchless orchestra took full advantage of the possibilities afforded by magnetic tape recording and the still-new 33 1/3 RPM LP to, for the first time, capture uncut concert arrangements of their signature songs.


    This album wouldn't have been possible without a chain of events starting at the end of World War II. Recorded in December 1950, just five years after Germany fell to the Allies, revealing the Germans' advances in magnetic tape recording, Ellington's master work holds its wonder still today and the recording quality hands-down betters the sound of many modern-day albums.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Mood Indigo
    2. Sophisticated Lady
    3. The Tattooed Bride
    4. Solitude
    Duke Ellington
    $34.99
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Masterpieces (Pure Pleasure) Masterpieces (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Masterpieces (Pure Pleasure)

    When Ellington went into the studio in 1950 to record the longer tracks on this LP, his orchestra was a bridge between its late-1940's configuration (the 5-man trumpet section) and its mid-1950's personnel. The sax section had settled into the form it would have for most of the ensuing two decades (old-timers Hodges and Carney and newcomers Procope, Hamilton and Gonsalves); the trombone section had long-timer Lawrence Brown as well as Tyree Glenn and newcomer Quentin Jackson; and the drummer was still Sonny Greer, who had anchored the rhythm section since the beginning.


    The arrangements and orchestrations all bear the hallmarks of Ellington's collaboration with Billy Strayhorn in the late 1940's: they are lush, symphonic, impressionistic, and densely (and adventurously) harmonic. Mood Indigo, in particular, is a 15-minute tone-poem with shifting colors and key relationships as Ellington and Strayhorn bring the melody through a wide variety of guises, from Glenn's wah-wah trombone solo to Shorty Baker's lyrical waltz to orchestral and piano passages which do homage to the influence which Ravel and Stravinsky had on both of them.


    The Tattooed Bride is the only new piece from the original Masterpieces by Ellington LP, and it is a beauty. The others of the original tracks -- Sophistocated Lady and Solitude -- are not laid out as inventively in their harmonics or structure. Of the group, Solitude is perhaps the weakest, but this is a relative term. Ellington would go on to pen many more extended, symphonic works, but none would have quite the multicolored, impressionistic tone-pallate that these do. And Strayhorn's presence would not be as pronounced in those future works as it is here: the orchestration and harmonies in particular bear his mark. These are masterpieces indeed: great works of art by two of our greatest composers/orchestrators, and played by one of the greatest orchestras in Afro-American music. - Andrew R. Weiss

    Musicians:



    • Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn (piano)
    • Cat Anderson, Clark Terry, Ray Nance (trumpet)
    • Quentin Jackson (trombone)
    • Johnny Hodges (reeds)
    • Mercer Ellington (french horn)
    • Russell Procope (clarinet, reeds)
    • Wendell Marshall (bass)
    • Louie Bellson (drums)




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Mood Indigo
    2. Sophisticated Lady
    3. The Tattooed Bride
    4. Solitude
    Duke Ellington
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Down Home (Pure Pleasure) Down Home (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Down Home (Pure Pleasure)

    Bethlehem Records was a major jazz label in the 1950's formed by Gus Wildi with an impressive roster of artists including singers Nina Simone, Carmen MacRae, Chris Conner & Mel Torme, to name a few; arrangers: Marty Paich, Russ Garcia, Frank Hunter; and musicians including: Dexter Gordon, Roland Kirk, Charles Mingus, Frank Rosolino, Herbie Mann, Stan Levey, Art Blakey, Milt Hinton, Errol Garner, Zoot Sims, Duke Ellington, J.J. Johnson and many, many others. The label distinguished itself by giving artists creative control of their projects and presented albums of rather cutting edge graphic design. Its legacy is a lengthy discography that freshly and ambitiously captured and preserved an era of truly amazing music including West Coast Cool Jazz, East Coast Bop, and Vocalists. For many of the artists, their first or greatest recorded work happened at Bethlehem. By trusting its staff and artists to make their own creative decisions, to experiment, and thus to flourish, Bethlehem actively helped create and not just document a whole and diverse era of Jazz music.
    1960, when this album was recorded, was one of Zoot Sims' most productive years. The performances here are recognised as being the masterpieces of Sims' middle period.



    Musicians:



    • Zoot Sims (tenor saxophone)

    • Dave McKenna (piano)

    • George Tucker (bass)

    • Dannie Richmond (drums)



    Recording: June 1960 in New York City by Peter Ind

    Production: Teddy Charles



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Jive At Five
    2. Doggin' Around
    3. Avalon
    4. I Cried For You
    5. Bill Bailey
    6. Goodnight Sweetheart
    7. There'll Be Some Changes Made
    8. I've Heard That Blues Before
    Zoot Sims
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Black, Brown And Beige (Speakers Corner) Black, Brown And Beige (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Black, Brown And Beige (Speakers Corner)

    Black, Brown, & Beige is Duke Ellington's musical representation of the African-American experience in the United States. It is arguably The Maestro's greatest work. The triumph of telling so important a story so well through music alone makes Duke Ellington's Black, Brown, & Beige a masterpiece. It also displays Duke's, and Jazz's, highest achievement in long form. Whether you perceive it as a three-movement symphony or accept Ellington's own personalized terminology Ā»Tone ParallelĀ«, Black, Brown, & Beige matches conceptually and in artistic content the musical continuity of Western Classical's greatest names in their lengthiest works.


    The history of Black, Brown, & Beige is in its own right momentous. Ellington premiered the work at Carnegie Hall on January 23, 1943, at Duke's first performance on that illustrious stage. The Maestro has created the Come Sunday Suite. Duke Ellington basically reduced his three movement work to its first, Black, elevating that movement's spiritual theme, Come Sunday, making it the melody of the edited work. Truncating the symphony Black, Brown, & Beige into the song Come Sunday works because Duke Ellington has expanded Come Sunday through numerous theme and variations unknown to the original. The piece de resistance: a sacred text, by Duke himself, a text sung by the best known African-American religious singer in history, Mahalia Jackson. There is no doubt that it is the presence and performance of Mahalia Jackson which secures a home in the pantheon for this recasting of Black, Brown, & Beige, a work that already resided there.


    And Duke Ellington pulled off this coup with one hand tied behind his back, or without the services of his right-hand man. Overlooked over the years since the album Black, Brown, & Beige was recorded in February 1958 is the absence of Johnny Hodges (Hodges did a gig with Strayhorn in Florida during this period), the Ellington band's premier soloist


    The sides C & D are released on vinyl for the first time with this issue.


    Recording in mono.


    Musicians:



    • Duke Ellington (piano)

    • Mahalia Jackson (vocal)

    • Clark Terry (trumpet)

    • Ray Nance (trumpet, vocal)

    • Quentin Jackson (trombone)

    • Harry Carney (bassoon)

    • Paul Gonsalves (tenor saxophone)

    • Jimmy Hamilton (clarinet)

    • Russell Procope (clarinet, alto saxophone)

    • Jimmy Woode (bass)

    • Sam Woody (drums)



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    LP 1
    1. Part I
    2. Part II
    3. Part III (AKA Light)
    4. Part IV (AKA Come Sunday)
    5. Part V (AKA Come Sunday)
    6. Part VI (23rd Psalm)


    LP 2
    1. Track 360 (AKA Trains)(Alt. Take)
    2. Blues In Orbit (AKA Tender)(Alt. Take)
    3. Part I (Alt. Take)
    4. Part II (Alt. Take)
    5. Part III (AKA Light) (Alt. Take)
    6. Part IV (AKA Come Sunday)(Alt. Take)
    7. Part V (AKA Come Sunday)(Alt. Take)
    8. Part VI (23rd Psalm)(Alt. Take)
    9. Studio Conversation (Mahalia Swears)
    10. Come Sunday (A Capella)

    Duke Ellington & Mahalia Jackson
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Mono - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Down Home Down Home Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Down Home

    Bethlehem Records was a major jazz label in the 1950's formed by Gus Wildi with an impressive roster of artists including singers Nina Simone, Carmen MacRae, Chris Conner & Mel Torme, to name a few; arrangers: Marty Paich, Russ Garcia, Frank Hunter; and musicians including: Dexter Gordon, Roland Kirk, Charles Mingus, Frank Rosolino, Herbie Mann, Stan Levey, Art Blakey, Milt Hinton, Errol Garner, Zoot Sims, Duke Ellington, J.J. Johnson and many, many others. The label distinguished itself by giving artists creative control of their projects and presented albums of rather cutting edge graphic design. Its legacy is a lengthy discography that freshly and ambitiously captured and preserved an era of truly amazing music including West Coast Cool Jazz, East Coast Bop, and Vocalists. For many of the artists, their first or greatest recorded work happened at Bethlehem. By trusting its staff and artists to make their own creative decisions, to experiment, and thus to flourish, Bethlehem actively helped create and not just document a whole and diverse era of Jazz music.
    1960, when this album was recorded, was one of Zoot Sims' most productive years. The performances here are recognised as being the masterpieces of Sims' middle period.



    Musicians:



    • Zoot Sims (tenor saxophone)

    • Dave McKenna (piano)

    • George Tucker (bass)

    • Dannie Richmond (drums)


    1. Jive At Five
    2. Doggin' Around
    3. Avalon
    4. I Cried For You
    5. Bill Bailey
    6. Goodnight, Sweetheart
    7. There'll Be Some Changes made
    8. I've Heard That Blues Before
    Zoot Sims
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Alabama Blues (Pure Pleasure) Alabama Blues (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Alabama Blues (Pure Pleasure)

    J. B. Lenoir was one of the outstanding blues artists of all times. His album Alabama Blues is the first recorded document by any blues poet, who included and incorporated very critically the social and political situation of black people living in the U.S.A. in the year of 1965. Thus a musical document was created long before the black communities in the United States became proud of their heritage - their roots. Jimi Hendrix was the first artist who acknowledged that J. B. Lenoir's work, preserved in this album, was a major part of his self-liberation and of finding his own identity. Though the Library of Congress has placed this album in its achives as an important part of American Musical History - comparable to Duke Ellington's Black, Brown and Beige Suite for example - it was never released in the United States, and even in Europe its distribution was poor. Because of this it has become one of the most searched-for collectors' items in music today. Pure Pleasure Records is happy and proud to release this masterpiece of music again.



    Musicians:



    • J. B. Lenoir (vocal, guitar)

    • Willie Dixon (vocal)

    • Freddie Below (drums)




    Recording: May 1965 in Chicago, Ill.

    Production: Horst Lippmann



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Alabama Blues
    2. The Mojo Boogie
    3. God's Word
    4. The Whale Has Swallowed Me
    5. Move This Rope
    6. I Feel So Good
    7. Alabama March
    8. Talk To Your Daughter
    9. Mississippi Road
    10. Good Advice
    11. Vietnam
    12. I Want To Go
    J.B. Lenior
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • King Of America (On Sale) King Of America (On Sale) On Sale Quick View

    $34.99 $31.49 Save $3.50 (10%)

    Buy Now
    x

    King Of America (On Sale)

    King of America on Numbered Limited Edition 180 Gram LP from Mobile Fidelity


    Costello Teams With Musical Legends and Standout Producer T-Bone Burnett on Exemplary 1986 Album


    Mastered from the Original Master Tapes: Mobile Fidelity LP Maximizes the Get-In, Get-Out, Live-In-the-Studio Immediacy and De-Congested Mix


    Includes Introspective Songwriting Gems Such as "Indoor Fireworks," "Poisoned Rose," "Brilliant Mistake," and "Little Palaces"


    Juggling Themes of Desire and Exile, Costello Strips Arrangements Down to Folk, Country and Pub-Rock Roots


    Elvis Costello spent the year prior to recording King of America embarking on a solo tour, usually accompanied by producer/singer-songwriter T-Bone Burnett. The pair's decision to collaborate on Costello's 1986 album came naturally, and the music sounds it-emotional, effortless, literate, seemingly uncomplicated. Credit, however, not only goes to the best batch of Costello originals since 1982's Imperial Bedroom, but to the literally awesome and awe-inspiring cast of musicians Burnett invited to participate.


    Mastered from the original master tapes and pressed at RTI, Mobile Fidelity's 180 gram LP of this masterpiece broadens the live-in-the-studio intimacy and opens up the midrange, highs, and lows of Burnett's fabulously de-congested mix. Made with few overdubs or effects, King of America relishes organic approaches and faithful tones-as well as a vast spaciousness and balance not always evident on Costello's efforts with the attractions. Finally, Mobile Fidelity transports the listener to the semicircle of players that surrounded Costello in the studio, and highlights the benefits of the center-of-the-production miking technique employed on the singer's voice and guitar playing.


    Given the brilliance of the performances, every music fan will want to be brought as near as possible to the purity of these sessions. A Hall of Fame-caliber list of instrumentalists accompany Costello, with Elvis Presley's T.C.B. mates Ron Tutt (drums), James Burton (guitar), and Jerry Scheff (bass) forming one band and drummer Earl Palmer (Little Richard), bassist Ray Brown (Oscar Peterson, Duke Ellington), pianist Tom Canning, and organist Mitchell Froom ready in waiting as another. Several of these musicians formed yet another band, joined by drummer Jim Keltner of Bob Dylan, George Harrison, and John Lennon fame. Oh-and the Attractions make a guest appearance on one track.


    King of America-the title reflective of the threads of intentional, thought-provoking contradiction throughout-would be exemplary if just for the troupe. Yet it's the combination of chemistry, ability, sonics, and tunes that propel this watertight platter to iconic status. Unconcerned with writing a radio hit or adhering to a single musical theme, Costello wrote a majority of the material on acoustic guitar and on piano, tapping his pub-rock and folk roots in turning out songs that remain some of the catchiest, introspective, and deep of his career. Cuts such as "Indoor Fireworks," "Poisoned Rose," "Brilliant Mistake," and "Suit of Lights" epitomize Costello's inimitable manner of viewing adulthood, romance, and geographical transition through a transparent lens that blocks neither truth nor consequence.


    As for the music? It swings (vide, Scheff's bass line on "Lovable"), swishes (Keltner's brushes on "I'll Wear It Proudly"), jumps (Brown's string bass on "Eisenhower Blues"), swoons ("Poisoned Rose"), and shuffles ("Jack of All Parades"). There's truly not a bum track here, and now, experienced in such high fidelity, the genius of every contributor can be easily heard and felt. Akin to Mobile Fidelity's other Costello reissues, this is not to be missed.


    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Brilliant Mistake
    2. Lovable
    3. Our Little Angel
    4. Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood
    5. Glitter Gulch
    6. Indoor Fireworks
    7. Little Palaces
    8. I'll Wear It Proudly
    9. American Without Tears
    10. Eisenhower Blues
    11. Poisoned Rose
    12. The Big Light
    13. Jack of All Parades
    14. Suit of Lights
    15. Sleep of The Just
    Elvis Costello
    $34.99 $31.49 Save $3.50 (10%)
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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