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  • Peter & The Wolf Peter & The Wolf Quick View

    $41.99
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    Peter & The Wolf


    180 Gram Audiophile Vinyl + Insert


    Classical Music On Vinyl Release: Packed In Sturdy PVC Collector's Bag




    David Bowie Narrates Prokofiev's Peter And The Wolf (1978) is a classical music album containing David Bowie's narration of Sergei Prokofiev's 1936 composition Peter And The Wolf. The music is performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra conducted by Eugene Ormandy. The album reached number 136 on the US Pop Albums chart.


    Side One contains the narration by David Bowie of public domain material originally written by Prokofiev. The second side of this LP features Eugene Ormandy conducting Benjamin Britten's Young Person's Guide To The Orchestra with the Philadelphia Orchestra. Ormandy and the aforementioned musicians from Philly also back up Bowie on side one.


    Critics lauded the album, saying Bowie 'found his most charming guise since Hunky Dory.' He tells the well-known fable with his usual eloquence and style, and gives instructions at the beginning for kids to understand how the music corresponds to characters in the story. The accompaniment from the Philadelphia Orchestra is first rate.


    The Music On Vinyl re-release includes detailed liner notes on the project by Mary Campbell, specifically geared to introduce children to the sounds of the individual instruments in the symphony orchestra. Both Prokofiev and Britten wrote their respective pieces with this aim in mind.

    1. Peter and the Wolf, Op. 65 (A Musical Tale for Children)
    2. Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra, Op. 34
    David Bowie
    $41.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Hunky Dory Hunky Dory Quick View

    $21.99
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    Hunky Dory

    Hunky Dory is the fourth album by David Bowie.Rhino will be breaking out 'breaking out' this albums from the David Bowie 'Five Years 1969 - 1973' box as a standalone releases. Available on 1 LP 180g Audiophile vinyl.
    1. Changes (2015 Remastered Version)
    2. Oh! You Pretty Things (2015 Remastered Version)
    3. Eight Line Poem (2015 Remastered Version)
    4. Life On Mars? (2015 Remastered Version)
    5. Kooks (2015 Remastered Version)
    6. Quicksand (2015 Remastered Version)
    7. Fill Your Heart (2015 Remastered Version)
    8. Andy Warhol (2015 Remastered Version)
    9. Song For Bob Dylan (2015 Remastered Version)
    10. Queen Bitch (2015 Remastered Version)
    11. The Bewlay Brothers (2015 Remastered Version)
    David Bowie
    $21.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Coin Coin Chapter Three: River Run Thee Coin Coin Chapter Three: River Run Thee Quick View

    $25.99
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    Coin Coin Chapter Three: River Run Thee

    "Roberts is carving out her own aesthetic space, startling in its originality and gripping in its historic and social power." - Peter Margasak


    "Primarily interrogating her own sense of identity as an African American woman, Roberts calls upon numerous other voices - from her family's history, her culture's mythology - to create living artifacts of collective cultural memory: simultaneously disorienting and exhilarating in their chaotic multiplicity." - The Quietus


    "Roberts is a major talent." - The Wire


    Matana Roberts is one of the most acclaimed, socio-politically conscious and aesthetically intrepid composers, band leaders, horn players and experimental sound practitioners of the past decade. Her multi-chapter Coin Coin work, which Constellation began documenting in 2011, has placed her at the forefront of stylistic
    innovation and radicalization, transcending jazz - or any other genre boundaries - while confirming the deep substance and soul that guides her compositional agenda. Following the critical accolades that the first two Coin Coin chapters have thus far received, the past year has been marked by further career-defining
    recognition for her body of iconoclastic work: Roberts was a recipient of both the Herb Alpert Award in the Arts and the Doris Duke Impact Award in 2014.


    Roberts has long employed the phrase "panoramic sound quilting" to describe the
    process surrounding her Coin Coin work. The third chapter in her Coin Coin series
    finds Roberts implementing this metaphor most explicitly, constructing a sound art
    tapestry from field recordings, loop and effects pedals, and spoken word recitations,
    alongside her saxophone and singing voices. Coin Coin Chapter Three: river run thee
    could arguably be considered first and foremost a vocal work, and notwithstanding
    its experimental and esoteric structure, a deeply narrative work as well. Not unlike
    2013's Coin Coin Chapter Two: Mississippi Moonchile, the new chapter unfolds as an
    uninterrupted album-length flow, this time in what Roberts calls "a fever dream" of
    sonic material, woven in surrealist fashion. Fragments of traditional song act as the
    main touchstones on the album, with Roberts' singing voice riding atop waves of
    radiophonic texture, layered spoken word and an often dislocated, wandering horn


    Working once again with engineer Radwan Ghazi Moumneh, and returning again to
    Montreal's Hotel2Tango studio (the location for her Chapter One recording in 2010),
    Roberts ran the river run thee tape back multiple times, adding new layers in real
    time, from start to finish (as opposed to calculated, isolated overdubs). The result is
    a visceral audio document that combines structure and improvisation in the fullest
    sense: not just in the playing and performing, but in the very marrow of the work's
    compositional DNA. It is also, for the first time in the Coin Coin cycle, a solo work,
    emerging from a lengthy solitary road trip Roberts took through the American South
    in early 2014, amassing historical and documentary information through interviews,
    site visits and field recordings.


    Coin Coin Chapter Three: river run thee signals yet another highly adventurous and
    socially engaged definition of what Jazz can mean in this day and age, and a
    fascinating extension of the Coin Coin cycle, where rather than surfacing and
    reactivating through the group dynamics of a musical ensemble, history is inhaled
    and exhaled through a solitary practice seeking to evoke and echo its tangled
    thicket of febrile strands.

    1. All Is Written
    2. The Good Book Says
    3. Clothed To The Land, Worn By The Sea
    4. Dreamer Of Dreams
    5. Always Say Your Name
    6. Nema, Nema, Nema
    7. A Single Man O' War
    8. As Years Roll By
    9. This Land Is Yours
    10. Come Away
    11. With Me Seek
    12. J.P.
    Matana Roberts
    $25.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Open Book Open Book Quick View

    $18.99
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    Open Book

    Fred Hersch has long been acclaimed as an exploratory artist, an outspoken activist, an influential educator and a uniquely revelatory and lyrical pianist. As one of the most expressive voices in modern jazz, Hersch has never been shy about letting listeners glimpse his most intimate thoughts and emotions. In September, however, Hersch's fans will be treated to even deeper, more revealing insights into the story of the renowned pianist when he publishes his much-anticipated memoir, Good Things Happen Slowly: A Life In and Out of Jazz. As a companion piece, Hersch decided to present an equally direct and vulnerable glimpse into his private musical thoughts with his 11th solo release, Open Book.

    The seven pieces on Open Book (set for release via Palmetto Records) offer some of the finest, most unguardedly emotional solo music that Hersch has created in a career unique for its profound poignancy and passion. Recorded in a South Korean concert hall on a superb Hamburg Steinway concert grand piano, the album captures the vital essence of the revelatory adventurousness and intense beauty that have made Hersch one of the most important solo artists in jazz. With more than 40 albums to his credit as a leader or co-leader, Hersch remarkably continues to discover new areas of inspiration and depths of feeling.

    For the last two and a half decades I've been pretty open about who I am, what I like and what I'm dealing with at times, Hersch says. But I've always got to dig deeper, and I thought this might be a chance to make an album that's a window into the kinds of things that I play at home or don't play in public all that much.

    The album arrives during a momentous month for Hersch. On September 12, the esteemed publishers Crown Archetype (Penguin Random House) will release Good Things Happen Slowly, Hersch's bravely confessional memoir. The book covers the pianist's meteoric rise in jazz from his sideman days alongside masters like Art Farmer and Joe Henderson to his gradual recognition as one of the most individualistic and innovative artists of his generation, a ten-time Grammy Award nominee and winner of countless accolades including being named a 2016 Doris Duke Artist as well as the same year's Jazz Journalists Association Pianist of the Year. But it also frankly reveals his story as the first openly gay, HIV-positive jazz musician, tracing his path through hedonistic post-Stonewall New York City to the dramatic two-month medically induced coma in 2007 from which he emerged to make some of the most stunning and captivating music of his career.

    Later that month Hersch will reprise his ambitious Leaves of Grass full-evening piece at Jazz at Lincoln Center's Appel Room, the first time the song cycle has been performed in New York City since 2005. Vocalists Kurt Elling and Kate McGarry will reprise their roles from the original project, which sets the verse of American bard Walt Whitman. The legendary poet's timeless ode to the miracle of nature and openhearted love of all beings seems especially vital in our present socio-political moment.

    The centerpiece of Open Book, and the spark that ignited the album, is the nearly 20-minute improvisation Through the Forest. Unique in Hersch's extensive discography, the stream-of-consciousness gem is a miniature masterpiece of narrative development, a compelling journey through an abstract, glimmering landscape, revealing that in his early 60s Hersch continues to take creative risks and daunting inventive leaps.

    The creation of Through the Forest was as unplanned and spontaneous as the music itself. In Seoul for a pair of solo concerts during a break in a tour of Asia with his esteemed trio, Hersch overslept during an after-breakfast nap and rushed to take the stage at JCC Art Center Concert Hall for his afternoon performance. The titular forest is, in part, a jetlag and coffee-fueled dreamscape through which Hersch wanders, applying his vivid powers of observation to unusual terrain. I was a little groggy, my defenses were down, and rather than fight it I just gave in to it, Hersch recalls. I'd never really done anything of that length in public where I had no agenda and was able to stay in that zone for such an extended period of time. I realized it was something special, something different that might be the core of an album.

    Through the Forest became the leaping-off point for an album intended to be singularly divulgent and reflective. A few months later, Hersch returned to the same hall and recorded the remainder of Open Book alone in the empty venue (with the exception of Benny Golson's classic Whisper Not, taken from a concert during that return engagement).

    The album opens with the stark musings of The Orb, taken from Hersch's autobiographical music-theater piece My Coma Dreams. A love letter to Hersch's longtime partner, AIDS activist Scott Morgan, The Orb is the final dream depicted in the show, and in this solo rendition becomes a nakedly heartfelt outpouring of raw but tender emotion. The mood then takes a turn for the playful and swinging on Whisper Not, a longtime staple of Hersch's repertoire that here becomes a vibrant, virtuoso marathon of thematic exploration.

    The piece also serves as an ideal mirror to the album's other composition from the pen of a jazz icon, Thelonious Monk's Eronel. Hersch has long been recognized as one of the premier interpreters of the Monk songbook, but despite including one of the iconic composer's pieces in every one of his sets for most of his career, Hersch had never tackled this particular tune, co-written by pianist Sadik Hakim. Monk's original stride-inflected lines come in for a dizzying array of variations in Hersch's endlessly imaginative take.

    The music of Brazil has also been a constant in Hersch's career, in particular the music of Antonio Carlos Jobim, the subject of one of the pianist's earlier solo efforts, 2009's Fred Hersch Plays Jobim. Picture in Black and White is a new addition to that repertoire, majestically transformed from a bossa nova feel to a crystalline hybrid with Chopin's last nocturne. On the other side of Through the Forest in the album's symmetrical structure comes Hersch's own classical-flavored Plainsong, a spare, lyrical piece composed in the bucolic setting of the MacDowell Colony, the inspirational artists' retreat in rural New Hampshire.

    Open Book ends on a meaningful ellipsis, Billy Joel's moving And So It Goes. In title alone it's an apt conclusion, suggesting an embrace of life as lived and hinting at its open-ended continuation. The full lyrics, which Hersch has performed in duo settings with singers including frequent collaborator Kate McGarry, remain unspoken here but obviously deeply felt in every note. I connect with the sentiment of the words, Hersch says, and it felt like a good benediction to the whole album.

    1. The Orb
    2. Whisper Not
    3. Zingaro
    4. Through The Forest
    5. Plainsong
    6. Eronel
    7. And So It Goes
    Fred Hersch
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I Don't Like Shit, I Don't Go Outside: An Album By Earl Sweatshirt I Don't Like Shit, I Don't Go Outside: An Album By Earl Sweatshirt Quick View

    $19.99
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    I Don't Like Shit, I Don't Go Outside: An Album By Earl Sweatshirt

    I Don't Like Shit, I Don't Go Outside: An Album by Earl Sweatshirt is the second studio album by American rapper Earl Sweatshirt.


    On his first studio album, 2013's Doris, the most mysterious member of L.A. shock-rap gremlins Odd Future proved himself by exploring real-life alienation. On his excellent second LP, Earl Sweatshirt keeps deepening his game - spooling out dense, mordant rhymes over zombifically blunted tracks as he somehow sucks you into his sunless reality. It's amazing that music so claustrophobic can be this engrossing.


    As always, Sweatshirt is most compelling when he's going toe to toe with his own demons. I spent the day drinking and missing my grandmother, he raps on Huey, perfectly summing up the music's desolate vibe. Mantra opens with some maniac grandstanding (With a cleaver and a .30 and some twisted weed/I pick one and let the crimson leak), then slides into a downhearted breakup song. Grief is a harrowing shut-in snapshot: I just want my time and my mind intact/When they both gone, you can't buy 'em back. At just 10 songs in a half-hour, I Don't Like Shit is surprisingly concise - even if it's sometimes dark and paranoid enough to make There's a Riot Goin' On sound like the Three's Company theme. And who needs more? Even a half-hour with Earl is enough to leave you with a lifetime of creepy memories.

    1. Huey
    2. Mantra
    3 . Faucet
    4. Grief
    5. Off Top
    6. Grown Ups
    7. AM // Radio
    8. Inside
    9. DNA
    10. Wool
    Earl Sweatshirt
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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