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  • Dead Cross (Red & Black Swirl Vinyl) Dead Cross (Red & Black Swirl Vinyl) Quick View

    $25.99
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    Dead Cross (Red & Black Swirl Vinyl)

    Pressed On Red & Black Swirl Vinyl

    Glow In The Dark Packaging

    Socal Band Features Dave Lombardo (Ex-Slayer, Suicidal Tendencies, Misfits), Mike Patton (Faith No More, Tomahawk), Justin Pearson (The Locust, Retox) And Michael Crain (Retox, Festival Of Dead Deer)

    Dead Cross emerged out of a series of impractical schemes, fallen-through plans, and last-minute musical experimentation. Shows were scheduled before a single song was written, fans were formed before even one show was played. The chaos of its creation seems apt; after all, the band is comprised entirely of artists who have thrived playing tightly-coiled turmoil-intelligent dissonance disguised as disorder. Consisting of Dave Lombardo, Justin Pearson, Michael Crain, and Mike Patton, the impressive, expansive, and eclectic list of prior bands collectively played in would be enough to ensure the unyielding ferocity of the music... but a resume isn't necessary, here. Dead Cross stands on its own, speaks volumes with its multilayered evil-genius vocals, manic guitar riffs, and brutal rhythms.

    1. Seizure and Desist
    2. Idiopathic
    3. Obedience School
    4. Shillelagh
    5. Bela Lugosi's Dead
    6. Divine Filth
    7. Grave Slave
    8. The Future Has Been Cancelled
    9. Gag Reflex
    10. Church of the Motherfuckers
    Dead Cross
    $25.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Dead Cross (Gold Vinyl) (Awaiting Repress) Dead Cross (Gold Vinyl) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $27.99
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    Dead Cross (Gold Vinyl) (Awaiting Repress)

    Pressed On Metallic Gold Vinyl - Limited To 2000 Copies

    Glow In The Dark Packaging

    Socal Band Features Dave Lombardo (Ex-Slayer, Suicidal Tendencies, Misfits), Mike Patton (Faith No More, Tomahawk), Justin Pearson (The Locust, Retox) And Michael Crain (Retox, Festival Of Dead Deer)

    Dead Cross emerged out of a series of impractical schemes, fallen-through plans, and last-minute musical experimentation. Shows were scheduled before a single song was written, fans were formed before even one show was played. The chaos of its creation seems apt; after all, the band is comprised entirely of artists who have thrived playing tightly-coiled turmoil-intelligent dissonance disguised as disorder. Consisting of Dave Lombardo, Justin Pearson, Michael Crain, and Mike Patton, the impressive, expansive, and eclectic list of prior bands collectively played in would be enough to ensure the unyielding ferocity of the music... but a resume isn't necessary, here. Dead Cross stands on its own, speaks volumes with its multilayered evil-genius vocals, manic guitar riffs, and brutal rhythms.

    1. Seizure and Desist
    2. Idiopathic
    3. Obedience School
    4. Shillelagh
    5. Bela Lugosi's Dead
    6. Divine Filth
    7. Grave Slave
    8. The Future Has Been Cancelled
    9. Gag Reflex
    10. Church of the Motherfuckers
    Dead Cross
    $27.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • We Were Skeletons We Were Skeletons Quick View

    $17.99
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    We Were Skeletons

    We Were Skeletons' brand of screamy, chaotic hardcore should appeal to long-time fans of the genre. The album was recorded with Will Killingsworth (Orchid, Ampere) at Dead Air Studios and is the band's greatest accomplishment to date. Imagine City of Caterpillar, Kidcrash, Off Minor and Hot Cross, all rolled into one breathtaking statement.
    1.  Drawn From The Houses I've Burnt

    2.  Exposure To Heavy Metal Causes Whatever

    3.  Pudge Paws

    4.  It's Like Science

    5.  Kids

    6.  Her Stomach Is A Lioness

    7.  Bruce Willis Is Dead The Whole Time

    8.  This Destroys Us

    9.  Well, I  Did Spend A Year In College


     


     

    We Were Skeletons
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Smell Of Female Smell Of Female Quick View

    $18.99
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    Smell Of Female

    Red Colored Vinyl


    Released in 1983 after a lengthy court battle with IRS Records, Smell of Female originally contained just the first six songs. These, plus out-of-control ad-lib freakouts "Beautiful Gardens" and "She Said" (previously omitted due to legal restrictions) were recorded live at New Yorks famous Peppermint Lounge. There is nothing like the sound of The Cramps, and this set distills that cross of swamp water, moonshine and nitro down to a dangerous and unstable musical substance, captured live like a crazed animal. They rocked like few others could.


    Additional bonus track "Surfin Dead" was recorded at A&M Studios in Hollywood and originally appeared on the 1984 soundtrack for Return of the Living Dead-when asked to write a "pop song" for the movie, The Cramps (by then a three-piece) threw into their cauldron a mix of Link Wray, Jan & Dean, Davie Allen, The Righteous Brothers, bongos, Phil Spector and eye of newt.

    1. Thee Most Exalted Potentate Of Love
    2. You Got Good Taste
    3. Call of the Wighat
    4. Faster Pussycat
    5. I Ain't Nuthin' But a Gorehound
    6. Psychotic Reaction
    7. Beautiful Gardens
    8. She Said
    9. Surfin' Dead
    The Cramps
    $18.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Grand Blood Grand Blood Quick View

    $16.99
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    Grand Blood

    Grand Blood from Doomriders is the follow up to their highly regarded 2010 album Darkness Comes Alive. Grand Blood was engineered by Kurt Ballou at God City Studios, and features artwork from Thomas Hooper as well as packaging from Ryan Patterson (Coliseum) and J. Bannon.


    Where Darkness Comes Alive was smooth and heavy in tone Grand Blood is jagged and hard in its heart. Grand Blood is Doomriders pushing themselves into wilder sonic territory previously unexplored by the band. In songs like Back Taxes and Bad Vibes, an angular noise rock influence takes the lead, creating a harsh and charged environment. Not to fret, the hooks Doomriders are known for are as sharp as ever though, sinking into songs like the personal Dead Friends and melodious and emotional Gone to Hell. Two songs that impressively showcase Nate Newton's evolving vocal ability. While monsters Father Midnight, New Pyramids, and Death In Heat are Doomriders at their heaviest and discordant to date. All complimented by new drummer Q (Magic Circle, Clouds, etc), whose frantic style powers this genre crossing masterpiece.

    1. New Pyramids
    2. Mankind
    3. Grand Blood
    4. Bad Vibes
    5. Dead Friends
    6. Death In Heat
    7. We Live In The Shadows
    8. Gone To Hell
    9. Back Taxes
    10. Father Midnight
    Doomriders
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Ire Works (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Repress) Ire Works (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
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    Ire Works (Colored Vinyl) (Awaiting Repress)

    Limited Edition Electric Blue Vinyl


    Ire Works succeeds in many of the same ways that their previous album did, while branching out creatively. They continue to toy with technical metal, blistering hardcore, jazz breaks, and post-punk, but here they evolve again by adding more twists and turns with additional electronic elements. While the merging of too many styles in hardcore can make for a convoluted result (see Avenged Sevenfold's self-titled release), the added instruments and genre changeups enhance the result rather than acting as ornamental distractions.


    Edgy Aphex Twin-style drill'n'bass drum breaks and stretched and squeezed electro blips feel strangely at home next to the psychotic time-signature changes and manic riffs, especially on the tracks Sick on Sunday, Dead as History, and When Acting as a Wave. Violins, pianos, and trumpets sit nicely in the mix, and the group's willingness to take chances leads to stunning artistic endeavors rather than stale attempts at crossing genres just for the sake of being clever. Original vocalist Dimitri Minakakis makes an appearance, as does Mastodon guitarist Brent Hinds, but the most notable inclusion is drummer Gil Sharone, who proves himself an expert at picking up the slack after the departure of founding member Chris Pennie to play in Coheed and Cambria.


    Undoubtedly, this act added anger to fuel the fire of their heavier numbers. 82588, Fix Your Face, and Party Smasher are as wicked and manic as their most difficult earlier stuff; conversely, the melodic hooks and falsetto of Black Bubblegum and the watery ambience of Mouth of Ghosts balance out the album nicely. It can be inaccessible and terrifying all at once, but in a genre overly saturated with formulaic groups, Ire Works is a true standout. If DEP aren't careful and continue down this innovative path, they could easily be labeled the Radiohead of metalcore- a visceral metal album that pushes the envelope.

    1. Fix Your Face
    2. Lurch
    3. Black Bubblegum
    4. Sick On Sunday
    5. When Acting As a Particle
    6. Nong Eye Gong
    7. When Acting As a Wave
    8. 82588
    9. Milk Lizard
    10. Party Smasher
    11. Dead As History
    12. Horse Hunter
    13. Mouth Of Ghosts
    Dillinger Escape Plan
    $19.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Sparkle And Fade Sparkle And Fade Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
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    Sparkle And Fade

    Remastered From High-Res Archives For the First Time!


    One Of Two Releases From Intervention Records' Lost '90s Series


    Mastered By Kevin Gray At Cohearent Audio


    Everclear remains one of the few elite acts to emerge from the post-Nirvana grunge explosion, rockers that could not only match the crunch and aggression of Seattle's finest, but the hooks and emotional honesty. Everclear's Art Alexakis wrote songs that were a mature but hard rocking brand of power pop with gritty, achingly true lyrics about addiction, failed relationships and loneliness. Sparkle and Fade was Everclear's second release, and it broke HUGE, a platinum-selling smash with hit tunes like Santa Monica, Heroin Girl and Heartspark Dollar Sign.


    A driving passion at IR is bringing music from the dark days of the CD era to glorious new light and life on premium vinyl. So much fantastic music from this era either never saw a vinyl release at all, or saw only a very limited and all too often low-quality release ripped from CDs without much care. During that era even if the original capture was to analog tape it was often ripped to digital and loaded into workstations for choosing final mixes, sequencing and final assembly. If vinyl was released during this era it is more than likely sourced from CD files. For releases that were never assembled in analog or were fully-digital recordings IR acquires and masters from high-resolution 20-24-bit files and if needed assembles final mixes, cross-fades, etc. during mastering. The increase in musicality and purity is as exponential as the increase in bit depth! Combining superior master sources with the truly full-range mastering chain at Cohearent and RTI's dead quiet vinyl pressing results in hearing the music that was the soundtrack to our lives like never before!

    1. Elektra Made Me Blind
    2. The Twistinside

    3. Heroin Girl
    4. Her Brand New Skin

    5. You Make Me Feel Like a Whore

    6. Nehalem

    7. Santa Monica

    8 Queen of the Air
    9. Summerland

    10. Pale Green Stars

    11. Strawberry

    12. Chemical Life

    13. Heartspark Dollarsign
    14. My Sexual Life
    Everclear
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • So Much for the Afterglow So Much for the Afterglow Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    So Much for the Afterglow

    So Much For the Afterglow hits include I Will Buy You A New Life and Father of Mine


    Remastered from High-Res Archives for the First Time!


    One of two releases from Intervention Records' Lost '90s Series


    Mastered By Kevin Gray At Cohearent Audio


    So Much for the Afterglow is the rare follow-up that bested the original in both critical acclaim and sales, going double platinum, yielding three top-five hits and landing the band a Billboard Modern Rock Artist of the Year award in 1998. Everclear remains one of the few elite acts to emerge from the post-Nirvana grunge explosion, rockers that could not only match the crunch and aggression of Seattle's finest, but the hooks and emotional honesty. Everclear's Art Alexakis wrote songs that were a mature but hard rocking brand of power pop with gritty, achingly true lyrics about addiction, failed relationships and loneliness.


    A driving passion at IR is bringing music from the dark days of the CD era to glorious new light and life on premium vinyl. So much fantastic music from this era either never saw a vinyl release at all, or saw only a very limited and all too often low-quality release ripped from CDs without much care. During that era even if the original capture was to analog tape it was often ripped to digital and loaded into workstations for choosing final mixes, sequencing and final assembly. If vinyl was released during this era it is more than likely sourced from CD files. For releases that were never assembled in analog or were fully-digital recordings IR acquires and masters from high-resolution 20-24-bit files and if needed assembles final mixes, cross-fades, etc. during mastering. The increase in musicality and purity is as exponential as the increase in bit depth! Combining superior master sources with the truly full-range mastering chain at Cohearent and RTI's dead quiet vinyl pressing results in hearing the music that was the soundtrack to our lives like never before!

    1. So Much For The Afterglow
    2. El Distorto De Melodica

    3. Everything To Everyone

    4. Amphetamine

    5. Ataraxia (Media Intro)

    6. White Men In Black Suits
    7. Normal Like You

    8. Sunflowers

    9. I Will Buy You A New Life

    10. Why I Don't Believe In God

    11. Father Of Mine

    12. Like a California King
    13. One Hit Wonder
    Everclear
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress) The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress)

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like "Death Rider," "The Beast Within," and "Raise The Dead" already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby "Blitz" Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.


    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.


    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. "It just makes sense for us," reflects D.D. "If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing "Grinder," the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work."


    "One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time," seconds Blitz. "Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics."


    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in "Come Heavy" and Iron Maiden in "The Long Road" and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.


    "Punk is huge for Overkill," confirms Verni. "And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world."


    Central to that premise is the incendiary "Let's All Go to Hades" which is sure to become a pit favourite. "This one was a hell of a lot of fun," says Blitz. "You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more."


    Adds D.D., "It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes."


    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is "Our Finest Hour." "It's about the recognition of sameness," explains Ellsworth. "I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune."


    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like "The Long Road." D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. "Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.


    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on "Our Finest Hour," is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.


    "I've had that kind of sound now for a long time," says Verni. "There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars."


    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. "Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds."


    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.


    "That's the strength of the band," explains Blitz. "Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization."


    And Ron? "He's one-of-a-kind," says Verni. "He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it."


    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.


    "I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.


    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.


    "For sure," says Blitz. "One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear."

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) (Pre-Order) The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) (Pre-Order) Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) (Pre-Order)

    Pressed On Yellow And Black Vinyl

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like Death Rider, The Beast Within, and Raise The Dead already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby Blitz Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.

    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.

    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. It just makes sense for us, reflects D.D. If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing Grinder, the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work.

    One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time, seconds Blitz. Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics.

    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in Come Heavy and Iron Maiden in The Long Road and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.

    Punk is huge for Overkill, confirms Verni. And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world.

    Central to that premise is the incendiary Let's All Go to Hades which is sure to become a pit favourite. This one was a hell of a lot of fun, says Blitz. You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more.

    Adds D.D., It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes.

    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is Our Finest Hour. It's about the recognition of sameness, explains Ellsworth. I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune.

    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like The Long Road. D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.

    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on Our Finest Hour, is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.

    I've had that kind of sound now for a long time, says Verni. There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars.

    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds.

    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.

    That's the strength of the band, explains Blitz. Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization.

    And Ron? He's one-of-a-kind, says Verni. He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it.

    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.

    I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.

    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.

    For sure, says Blitz. One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear.

    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed PRE-ORDER Buy Now
  • Broken People Broken People Quick View

    $18.99
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    Broken People

    American music is a mile-wide river that beckons black and white, urban and rural, dreamer and doer alike to launch their vessels. All the streams of style and genre flow into it; its tributaries are blues and jazz, mountain and folk, rock, soul and R&B.


    The release of the debut album by Muddy Magnolias, Broken People, marks the launch of a great new vessel onto that waterway. The album showcases a confluence of style and sound as colorful as it is unlikely, steeped in that river of influence, yet bracingly fresh.


    With Broken People, Jessy Wilson and Kallie North take us on an 11-song journey with its origins in two widely divergent backgrounds that came together in a friendship and creative partnership with world-changing resonance.


    North was raised in southeast Texas and began singing with her family and studying piano at an early age. She grew to love rich vocal harmonies singing in church choirs and listening to artists like the Carpenters, Alison Krauss, James Taylor and the Eagles. By her early teens, she was singing lead parts in church and in musical theater productions at her high school. Her palette grew when a friend turned her on to the Grateful Dead, and after high school she spent every spare moment in the clubs of Austin, absorbing everything from alt-country and jam bands to New Orleans funk. She met her husband at a concert and moved with him to his native Mississippi. There, on their isolated farm, she had her awakening, starting a career as a photographer, capturing the spirited, deep history of the Mississippi Delta.


    "To me, the Delta is the most overlooked and mysterious place," she says. "It was the birthplace of America's music, and all the legends were influenced by everything that came out of it. I went on this personal exploration to learn about the Delta blues and the region's history. I picked up a camera and started taking pictures, blogging about what I was experiencing, and I tapped into all the creative energy lying dormant inside me." When her husband gave her a guitar, she began spending her days on the porch of their farm learning how to connect her first chords. From there, the songs began pouring out and she knew she had to find a way to get to Nashville and write songs professionally.


    Wilson, raised in Brooklyn, was in love with music from her earliest days. She was singing before she could talk, and was 5 when her mother recognized her passion for music. "I would cry because I couldn't hit the high notes in Whitney Houston and Mariah Carey songs," she says. Influenced by greats from Aretha and Smokey Robinson to Lauryn Hill, Mary J. Blige and The Notorious B.I.G., she began auditioning in the highly competitive New York entertainment scene and was working professionally in musical theater by the age of 10. Her mother took her to nightclubs where she experienced a variety of live performances. She attended New York's top performing arts schools, including La Guardia High School, the "Fame" school, where she discovered her love for gospel music and took part in the gospel chorus for four years. She worked at Cafe Wha? in Greenwich Village, making $500 a weekend while still in high school.


    She sang backup for Alicia Keys in her teens, then worked four years with John Legend, and through him with legends like will.i.am, Kanye West, Raphael Saadiq and Babyface. Legend mentored her in songwriting and recording before she began writing songs on her own for American Idol winner Fantasia Barrino and others. Inspired by her evolving love of songwriting, she too moved to Nashville, looking for a wider creative palette. There, while meeting with then-BMI executive Clay Bradley, her eye settled on a photograph of "a rundown juke joint piano" in his office.


    "I want to meet whoever took that photo," she said. The photographer was North-it had been taken during her creative awakening in Mississippi-and the subsequent meeting led quickly to collaboration and an epic friendship.


    "The first day we wrote together," says North, "there wasn't much thought that we were blending genres and worlds. That never came up. It was just natural. She had never written a country song and I was writing them every day. We sat down to write one but when we listened back it was a country R&B song. And we decided to become songwriting partners." Before long, they had their first cut as collaborators, and they were off and running.


    "The spirit of the Muddy Magnolias existed from the moment we met," says Wilson, "but we didn't know we were the Muddy Magnolias yet." North was toying with the idea of a solo career; Wilson had aspirations of making history as an African-American female songwriter in Nashville. Their new friendship was a game-changer.


    "We spent a whole year writing, trying to understand what our message was when we combined our stories," says Wilson. Then one day over afternoon wine at Burger Up, their favorite hangout in the 12 South section of Nashville, both admitted to be being at a crossroads. "The next thing you know," says North, "Jessy said, 'What if we made a record together?' It was like all of our dreams in one."


    "We went back to that same office on Music Row where I saw the photograph," says Wilson, "and sat down side by side in Clay's office and said, 'We've got something to tell you. We're going to make an album together.'" Bradley believed enough to sign on as their manager. They held three days of band auditions and found four best friends who had been playing together since college, primarily doing jazz. The fit was perfect, providing just the right sonic backdrop for their soulful approach and high-energy delivery.


    As they continued to write and perform, opening for the likes of The Zac Brown Band and Gary Clark, Jr., they put together a project that crosses genres effortlessly, showcasing two voices that soar together in a blending of cultures as electrifying as if Janis Joplin and Tina Turner, or Whitney Houston and Lee Ann Womack had joined forces.


    Broken People combines poetic imagery and vocal passion, with the musicianship and production of Motown or Muscle Shoals by way of the raw honesty of Sun Records. Of course it deals with love, longed for and unleashed, in songs like "I Need A Man," "Why Don't You Stay" and "Devil's Teeth," but the album soars as it reaches for bigger themes, dealing with the need for hope in "Take Me Home," for love on a societal scale in "Shine On" and "Brother What Happened," and hope for the future in "Got It Goin' On." With "Leave It To The Sky," the two, joined by John Legend on vocals and piano, make a powerful case for spiritual solutions, and few songs in the modern lexicon are as steeped in present-day reality as the gospel- and R&B-tinged title track.


    "Ultimately," says North, "this album is a result of an unlikely friendship and is a testament to what can happen when you diversify your relationships."


    "It's about getting out of your comfort zone and being rewarded with a great friendship," adds Wilson. "We've both felt the power of that."


    "Our path is so much better and our lives are so much richer because of it," says North, "and we want to bring people along on this journey."


    "We want to see what society would be like if we all reached out in ways we normally wouldn't," adds Wilson.


    And that is the magic and the message. The music of Muddy Magnolias, live and on record, comes from a place where the Mississippi meets the A-Train by way of Nashville. Whether yours is the back porch or the front stoop, Spanish moss or window box garden, dusty country lane or crowded subway car, rural honky-tonk or uptown club, this is music that beckons. Muddy Magnolias are collaboration without boundaries, musical healing in a landscape of the heart, and all of us who treasure creative energy, honest art and the possibilities of love and unity, are better for their arrival.

    1. Broken People
    2. Brother, What Happened?
    3. Got It Goin' On
    4. Why Don't You Stay
    5. Take Me Home
    6. Shine On!
    7. It Ain't Easy
    8. I Need A Man
    9. Devil's Teeth
    10. Train
    11. Leave It To The Sky (feat. John Legend)
    Muddy Magnolias
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Idle Hands Idle Hands Quick View

    $15.99
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    Idle Hands


    Mixed & Mastered By Peter Rutcho At Damage Studios (THE GHOST INSIDE, BURY YOUR DEAD, VANNA)


    "Energy-fueled epic-core with lots of aggression, a healthy blend of raw shouts and low end growls and foot stomping hooks." - Kerrang!


    VICTORY RECORDS is proud to release Idle Hands, the debut album from dynamic South Wales, UK metal/hardcore outfit, CONTINENTS. Formed in 2010, CONTINENTS quickly established themselves within the ever-growing UK music scene through their intense music and stage presence. They are five self-proclaimed "lads with a party attitude who love getting groups of people into a room who share their passion for music." Live, this UK bunch throws a blistering barrage of energy at the crowd which is evident in their first music video, "Trials"; which received over 10,000 views on YouTube, in just the first few days. Thanks to "Trials", in November 2011 the band was voted as a favorite YouTube UK Metal Act and was featured on the YouTube home page.


    "We've always tried to put our own passion for our music before external influence, the most important thing for us is that we enjoy the music we play, and if other people enjoy it too then that's awesome," said vocalist, Phil Cross. "We like to mix elements of our favorite styles and influences, and then put our own perspective on things to see where it takes us." CONTINENTS has created their heaviest music to date on Idle Hands all while incorporating a fresh take on modern hardcore. Expect 2013 to start off with a bang as CONTINENTS becomes a serious force to be reckoned with.

    1. 224
    2. Idle Hands
    3. Pegasus, Pegasus
    4. Inhale
    5. Land Of The Free
    6. Sheep In Wolves' Clothing
    7. Regrets

    8. Loathe
    9. Trials
    10. Exhale
    11. Truth And Lies

    12. Lion's Den
    Continents
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I Want To See The Bright Lights Tonight I Want To See The Bright Lights Tonight Quick View

    $22.99
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    I Want To See The Bright Lights Tonight

    Ranked #479 on Rolling Stone List of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time


    Duo's First Collaboration Together Also Its Darkest, Loveliest


    Faithfully Recreated Artwork Complete with LP Insert


    Richard Thompson found a sympathetic companion in his then-new wife Linda Thompson, with whom he
    collaborates on 1974's mystic I Want to See the Bright Lights Tonight. While only his second solo record, the guitar virtuoso sounds well beyond his years on an effort simultaneously bathed in thematic darkness and illuminated with melodies that glisten with elegance, beauty, and joy. With her rich and transparent voice, and superb feel for nuance, Linda effortlessly pairs with her mate's consequential fare-not an easy task.


    Indeed, Richard, just a few years removed from his tenure in iconic folk ensemble Fairport Convention, lays down several of the most memorable riffs and fills of his prolific career, accenting moody songs that address trappings of fame, circumstantial failings, and wry cynicism with unusual panache and grace. His allegorical skills are in full bloom on "The Calgary Cross" and metaphorical "The Great Valerio," the latter brought to peak via a hammered dulcimer and acoustic coda borrowed from Erik Satie.


    In listening to I Want to See the Bright Lights Tonight, one can't help be reminded of how cultural critic Greil Marcus described Thompson's self-sacrificial and surreal brilliance: "Sometimes Thompson seems to be singing from the plague years, following behind a cart full of corpses, laughing at the stupidity of human faith in one verse, cursing God with the next-but time stops. At any given moment, [he] steps forward playing both fool and executioner; he cuts off his own head and holds it up for the pleasure of the crowd, shaming it quiet."
    And so it goes here.


    Music sounds better on vinyl. Especially when it's experienced on new pressings from RTI, America's finest record plant. Introducing Wax Cathedral, an imprint focused on reissuing great albums on LP, complete with dead-quiet surfaces and authentically replicated artwork. Wax Cathedral goes where few other labels dare, restoring titles from diverse genres, myriad eras, and recognizable artists beloved by generations of listeners. Wax Cathedral is all about bringing back quality vinyl titles that have been out-of-print on LP for decades, and having fun in the process. Get your turntables ready.

    1. When I Get to the Border
    2. The Calvary Cross
    3. Withered and Died
    4. I Want to See the Bright Lights Tonight
    5. Down Where the Drunkards Roll
    6. We Sing Hallelujah
    7. Has He Got a Friend For Me
    8. The Little Beggar Girl
    9. The End of the Rainbow
    10. The Great Valerio
    Richard & Linda Thompson
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP Reissue - Sealed Buy Now
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