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  • Rachmaninoff - Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner) Rachmaninoff - Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Rachmaninoff - Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner)

    The Second Piano Concerto represents Rachmaninoff's escape from a crisis lasting several years during which he experienced one catastrophe after another. At the suggestion of his psychiatrist, who had prophesied that he would write wonderful music, he turned once again to the work - and it brought him his greatest success to that date. Although the piano writing demands enormous technical dexterity, the composer was apparently not solely aiming at producing a virtuosic showpiece, since the piano part clings snugly to the orchestra like an accompaniment for long stretches, although it does triumph powerfully here and there for good measure.



    Once again, Byron Janis - whose brilliant interpretations of Rachmaninoff's repertory have influenced whole generations of pianists - has made a benchmark recording in which he alagamates tremendous energy with great tranquility. He revels in the late-Romantic ecstatic harmonies, dazzles us with his transparent presentation of the internal structures, and displays great vigour in the weighty themes. The emotional middle movement is also glorious in that Janis enjoys to the full the interplay of passion and reverie with expansive chords and dark-hued tonalities.




    Recording: April 1960 at the Northrop Memorial Auditorium, Minnesota, USA, by C.R. Fine and Robert Eberenz

    Production: Wilma Cozart-Fine and Harold Lawrence




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Opus 18
    Two Preludes For Piano Solo
    E Flat Major, Opus 23, No. 6
    C Sharp Minor, Opus 3, No. 2
    Byron Janis and Minneapolis Symphony
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.3 in D Minor Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.3 in D Minor Quick View

    $21.99
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    Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.3 in D Minor

    Byron Janis, London Symphony Orchestra, Antal Doráti

    Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.3 in D Minor
    1. I Allegro Ma Non Troppo
    2. II Intermezzo: Adagio
    3. III Finale: Alla Breve
    Byron Janis, London Symphony Orchestra, Antal Doráti
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.2; 2 Preludes Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.2; 2 Preludes Quick View

    $18.99
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    Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.2; 2 Preludes

    Newly presented on 180g heavyweight vinyl, Decca are proud to present an iconic Mercury Living Presence album
    from the analogue era back on vinyl. Presented with original artwork and pressed at Optimal GmbH, each release
    has been carefully mastered from the original Decca analogue tapes at Abbey Road Studios.


    This LP includes Rachmaninov's Second Piano Concerto with soloist Byron Janis and the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra
    conducted by Antal Doráti.

    1. Moderato
    2. Adagio sostenuto
    3. Allegro scherzando
    4. Prelude in E Flat Major, Op. 23, No.6
    5. PrÉlude in C sharp minor, Op.3, No.2
    Byron Janis / Minneapolis Symphony / Antal Dorati
    $18.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Liszt: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2 (Speakers Corner) Liszt: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Liszt: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2 (Speakers Corner)

    Liszt's Piano Concertos occupy a special position in the genre for several reasons. Firstly they mirror the amazing keyboard virtuosity of the composer, and secondly they point the way to modern music through their daring harmonies and free treatment of traditional compositional forms. Any pianist who tackles the mighty E flat major Concerto, which was premiered by Liszt himself under the baton of Berlioz in 1855, soon realises that he has taken on a mammoth task. Instead of an over-dimensional, weighty performance, Byron Janis and the Moscow Philharmonic present a compact reading of this tightly-knit composition. Janis, a pupil of Horowitz, displays his bravura in the appropriate places, but also knows how to use his technical prowess - perfected in his early years - to produce finely-chiselled keyboard poetry, freeing the work from its often-cited bulkiness. This is particularly effective in the intoxicating Finale, where the pianist's brilliance amalgamates with triumphal orchestral playing.



    In the Second Concerto, too, it is clear that great care has been taken with the score. Beginning with the elegiac entry, via the pulsating Agitato up to the expressive melodic playing, Byron Janis and Gennadi Rozhdestvensky fill this visionary symphonic poem with wonderful timbral colouring which is brought to a climax in the sparkling Finale. When music from the New German School sounds like it does here by means of Russian hands, then it certainly deserves a place in our Russian Edition.



    Recording: June 1962 in Bolshoi Hall of the Tchaikovsky Conservatory, Moscow, Russia,

    by C.R. Fine and Robert Eberenz / Production: Wilma Cozart



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    Byron Janis
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mussorgsky - Pictures at an Exhibition (Speakers Corner) Mussorgsky - Pictures at an Exhibition (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Mussorgsky - Pictures at an Exhibition (Speakers Corner)

    This two-LP set includes as a very special bonus the piano-only version of Pictures at an Exhibition cut at 45 RPM. This is how this work was originally composed though no recording of that version has previously been released. The full symphonic version of Pictures at an Exhibition is cut here at 33 1/3.



    The orchestral version of Mussorgskys musical picture gallery has always been one of the most popular works ever heard in concert halls all over the world. Originally written for the piano, the unsuccessful composer never heard the work in all its symphonic glory, although many of his contemporaries had often been tempted to arrange his works. As early as 1891, ten years after his death, Mikhail Tushmalov a pupil of Rimsky-Korsakov presented a first version. However, it is Maurice Ravels orchestral version from 1922 that remains unsurpassed to this day. His arrangement amalgamates the original force and angularity of the piano with the brilliance of a modern orchestra.The transparent and powerful performance by the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra is complemented by an equally fascinating version from one of Mercurys main pianists, Byron Janis. In listening to the two interpretations one after the other it becomes clear as to how closely Ravel remained true to the original version while still managing to imbue his genial orchestral version with his own tonal conception. The solo piano recording, released for the first time on vinyl, will certainly be of special interest to record collectors.




    Recording: April 1959 at Northrup Auditorium, Minneapolis, USA, and September 1961 in

    Ballroom Studio A at Fine Recording, New York, by C.R. Fine / Production: Wilma Cozart




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Gnomus
    2. Il Vecchio Castello
    3. Tuilleries, Disput D'Enfants Apres Jeux
    4. Bydlo
    5. Ballet of the Chickens in Eggs
    6. Samuel Goldenberg and Schmuyle
    7. Limoges
    8. Catacombs
    9. The Hut on the Fowl's Legs
    10. The Great Gate at Kiev
    Byron Janis
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
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