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Brilliant Corners

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  • Brilliant Corners Brilliant Corners Quick View

    $27.99
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    Brilliant Corners

    Two superb piano trio albums of covers had set the stage for Monk the composer to re-emerge with horns, and the pianist responded with BRILLIANT CORNERS, one of his greatest recordings, featuring three classic new tunes and two formidable studio bands. The Sonny Rollins featured on BRILLIANT CORNERS is a far more imposing presence than the young acolyte of previous Monk sessions--just witness the title tune. With its multiple themes, quirky intervallic leaps, idiomatic rhythmic changes and tricky transitions in tempo, it is one of Monk's masterpieces--a miniature symphony. So daunting were its technical challenges, that the final ending was edited on from another take. Rollins begins his solo with swaggering composure, boldly paraphrasing Monk's vinegary intervals and trademark trills, before navigating the swift rapids of the double-time chorus with deft syncopations. Monk plies dissonance upon dissonance in his first chorus, playing rhythmic tag with Max Roach on the out chorus. Ernie Henry's slip-sliding bluesiness is followed by a brilliant rhythmic edifice from Roach, who maintains melodic coherence at a drowsy tempo, then explodes into the final chorus.Elsewhere, Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues-Are is a soulful, easygoing blues, and Monk's solo is a compendium of pithy rhythmic devices, bent notes and calculated melodic abstractions, played with enormous relaxation and swing. He concludes with heckling big-band figures that form the basis for Rollins' expressive rhythmic testimonies. Monk employs the bell-like timbre of a celeste to stunning effect on Pannonica, one of his loveliest melodies and improvisations. And in closing, Bemsha Swing is a hard-swinging, conversational performance, with fine contributions from trumpeter Clark Terry, bassist Paul Chambers and Roach on drums and timpani.
    1. Brilliant Corners
    2. Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues-Are
    3. Pannonica
    4. I Surrender Dear
    5. Bemsha Swing
    6. Pannonica (Thelonious Monk)(Alt. Take)*


    *Bonus Track

    Thelonious Monk
    $27.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brilliant Corners Brilliant Corners Quick View

    $21.99
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    Brilliant Corners

    Few composers or improvisers can match the originality of pianist Thelonious Monk. Quirky yet rigorously logical, Monk's playful but always purposeful choice of skewed melodies and interrupted rhythm patterns gave the bebop movement, and jazz in total, a new sound that was totally modern. Although he created a surprisingly limited body of compositions, his impact on the vocabulary and canon of jazz is second to none, including such prolific giants as Duke Ellington. Brilliant Corners is a triumph of both performance and conception: the two small-group sessions, anchored by Monk, drummer Max Roach, and the bass work of either Oscar Pettiford or Paul Chambers, feature superb front-line performances by saxophonists Sonny Rollins and the tragically under-recorded Ernie Henry, as well as trumpeter Clark Terry. The title track, which centers the collection, is one of Monk's most unconventional pieces, skirting whole-tone, chromatic and Lydian scales; a version of Pannonica finds Monk doubling on celeste, while the band stretches out on Bemsha Swing and the blues Ba-lue Bolivar Ba-lues-are. - Fred Goodman
    1. Brilliant Corners
    2. Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues-Are
    3. Pannonica
    4. I Surrender, Dear
    5. Bemsha Swing
    Thelonious Monk
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brilliant Corners / Thelonious Himself Brilliant Corners / Thelonious Himself Quick View

    $37.99
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    Brilliant Corners / Thelonious Himself

    Import
    LP 1 - Brilliant Corners


    1. Brilliant Corners
    2. Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues Are
    3. Pannonica
    4. I Surrender, Dear
    5. Bemsha Swing


    LP 2 - Thelonious Himself


    1. April In Paris
    2. (I Don't Stand) A Ghost Of A Chance
    3. Functional
    4. I'm Getting Sentimental Over You
    5. I Should Care
    6. 'Round Midnight
    7. All Alone
    8. Monk's Mood

    Thelonious Monk
    $37.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Paradise Freaks Paradise Freaks Quick View

    $23.99
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    Paradise Freaks

    Recording with a core group featuring Al Doyle (Hot Chip/LCD Soundsystem) on bass and guitar Rob Smoughton (Hot Chip/Grovesnor) on drums and guitar and Kenny Dickenson (KT Tunstall/Red Ken) on keys, Seahawks invited some of their favourite singers to contribute vocals. Maria Minerva, Tim Burgess, Indra Dunis of Peaking Lights and missing-in-action psychedelic songsmith Nick Nicely all added their unmistakeable tones. A set of final overdubs from Tom Furse (The Horrors) and some tinkering from Seahawks' regular Cornish musical mates sealed the deal. The whole process took time but what is time when faced with the epic expanse of the cosmos - a cosmos full of soft tones and brilliant corners, unexpected collisions, warm openings, deep colours and fresh textures.
    1. Rainbow Sun (feat. Maria Minerva)
    2. Looking At The Sun (feat. Tim Burgess)
    3. Drifting (feat. Indra Dunis Of Peaking Lights)
    4. Safe Harbour (feat. Indra Dunis Of Peaking Lights)
    5. Paradise Freaks
    6. Moon Turn Tides (feat. Maria Minerva)
    7. Sky Is You (feat. Maria Minerva)
    8. Didn't Know I Was Lost (feat. Tim Burgess)
    9. Electric Waterfalls (feat. Nick Nicely)
    10. Islands
    Seahawks
    $23.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Ma Vlast (Speakers Corner) Ma Vlast (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
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    Ma Vlast (Speakers Corner)

    Smetana's symphonic poem "Má Vlast" consists of several individual compositions which the composer put together at a later date to form a cycle and is one of the greatest testimonies to Czech national music. The Bohemian countryside and sagas are reflected in the tone poem From "Bohemia's Woods and Fields", while the programmatic "Moldau" occupies a rightful place among the most outstanding works to have been written in the late 19th century. Thanks to its popular folk melodies, its clearly structured and recognizable "programme", and brilliant orchestration, the work has never failed to arouse the enthusiasm of a wide public.



    Rafael Kubelik conducted numerous first-class orchestras both in the concert hall and in the recording studio, and won a deserved reputation as the Smetana connoisseur. He is to be congratulated on his choice of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra for this recording: gentle and transparent in the gossamer-light orchestral passages, powerful and smooth when playing as a full tutti. This thoroughly satisfying performance is further enhanced by its excellent recording technique and is to be recommended to all collectors.





    Musicians:



    • The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

    • Rafael Kubelik (conductor)




    Recording: April 1958 at Sofiensaal, Vienna by Gordon Parry

    Production: Eric Smith




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Vysehrad
    2. Vltava (Moldau)
    3. Sarka
    4. From Bohemia's Meadows and Forest
    5. Tabor
    6. Blanik
    Rafael Kubelik with Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Call Me (Speakers Corner) Call Me (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Call Me (Speakers Corner)

    What connects celebrity chefs and pop stars is their fine nose for ingredients, especially when hot and spicy ones are mixed with milder elements to create an aromatic result. A combination of 'sweet' and 'funky' is the secret of Al Green's gloriously sentimental and sensual pop songs, which in the sexually free Seventies were often referred to as »songs to make love by«. What swings along gently is, however, Al Green's subtly controlled falsetto, which he can tone right to the threshold of audibility. But watch out! This music belts out some fiery sounds right from the very first number. The sinuous, swinging request in the brilliant hit single Call Me, the relaxed and groovy Stand Up, with its sharp wind interjections which demand one's unerring attention, are typical for Green's style, just as is his almost disturbing capability to gain comfort from loneliness (I'm So Lonesome, I Could Cry). This rhythmically powered music can best be described as light, intensive, dynamic but never flashy (Your Love Is Like The Morning Sun). It finds its earthly culmination in soul (I'm Waiting) and spiritual depth.



    Musicians:



    • Al Green (vocal)

    • James Mitchell (bassoon, arranger)

    • Andrew Love (tenor sax)

    • Jack Hale (trombone)

    • Wayne Jackson (trumpet)

    • Mabon Hodges (guitar)

    • Charles Hodges (keyboards)

    • Archie Turner (piano)

    • Leroy Hodges (bass)

    • Howard Grimes (drums)

    • The Memphis Strings



    Recording: 1973 at Royal Recording Studios, Memphis, TN, by Willie Mitchell

    Production: Al Green and Willie Mitchell




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Call Me (Come Back Home)
    2. Have You Been Making out O.K.
    3. Stand Up
    4. I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry
    5. Your Love Is Like the Morning Sun
    6. Here I Am (Come and Take Me)
    7. Funny How Time Slips Away
    8. You Ought to Be with Me
    9. Jesus Is Waiting
    Al Green
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Man-Child (Speakers Corner) Man-Child (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Man-Child (Speakers Corner)

    After his early avant-garde years with Blue Note Records, Herbie Hancock achieved much success with pop music fans by gradually turning towards a mixture of Afro-American styles in which he combined soul, jazz and funk. Having composed the soundtrack to Bill Cosby's animated children's show Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids and released a popular family-orientated album entitled Fat Albert Rotunda, Hancock stated that instead of looking for jazz musicians who could play funky music, he had searched for funk musicians with a feeling for jazz. That this concept functions only too well is demonstrated in the funky album Man-Child, which features such brilliant jazz musicians as Wayne Shorter, Bennie Maupin and Ernie Watts. But wait! There's no narcissistic showing off here as in a jam session. The whole band performs as one, playing concentrated grooves around Hancock's carefully intertwined electronic sounds. The result is a fast-paced funky style, due to the collective efforts of the band, although each member is given ample opportunity to show off his prowess in short solo interludes and thus delight the listener with his unique style.



    Musicians:



    • Bud Brisbois (trumpet)

    • Garnett Brown (trombone)

    • Dick Hyde (tuba, bass trombone)

    • Wayne Shorter (soprano saxophone)

    • Bennie Maupin (soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone, saxello, bass clarinet, flute)

    • Jim Horn (saxes, flute)

    • Stevie Wonder (harmonica)

    • Herbie Hancock (keyboard)

    • David T. Walker (guitar)

    • Wah Wah Watson (guitar, voice bag, synthesizer)

    • Henry Davis (electric bass)

    • James Gadson (drums)

    • Bill Summers (percussion)



    Recording: July 1975 at Wally Heider Recording Studios, San Francisco / Village Recorders, Los Angeles / Funky Features, San Francisco / Crystal Studios, Los Angeles

    Production: David Rubinson & Friends Inc. and Herbie Hancock



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Hang Up Your Hang Ups
    2. Sun Touch
    3. The Traito
    4. Bubbles
    5. Steppin' In It
    6. Heartbeat
    Herbie Hancock
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Amigos (Speakers Corner) Amigos (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Amigos (Speakers Corner)

    Santana's music is like the game of Mikado - a tight bundle of pieces in various styles that is difficult to handle, even for experienced musicians. No whether the sticks are labelled funk, jazz, rock, R & B, or folk: when you try to pick out just one of these, the whole lot vibrates alongside.



    It seems relatively simple (and is often attempted) to try and sort out track lists according to more or less commercially oriented compilations. And having fastidiously set up the ranking and astutely discussed it in your circle of friends, you can sit back and enjoy the brilliant guitar sound of such blockbusters as Caravanserai or Welcome - quality rules the day!



    In his seventh album the guitar guru is once again surrounded by numerous freshly recruited supporting musicians and the star producer David Rubinson. The latter watches carefully over the development of this project, which is highly reminiscent of the early Santana sound. A perceptible infatuation with the vocals, or the wealth of buzzing, pulsating, clattering, clicking rhythms, or yet again the inimitable bubbling, frothy guitar solos: a Santana LP is simply unthinkable without all this. Why then should one try to pick out the various styles, genres or consumer groups when this record belongs to his best and most important six, seven - or maybe even eight? At the end of the day, we all remain amigos with Santana.



    Musicians:



    • Devadip Carlos Santana (guitar, vocals, percussion, conga)

    • Tom Coster (keyboards)

    • Ndugu Leon Chandler (drums, percussion, conga)

    • Armanda Peraza (conga, percussion, vocals)

    • David Brown (bass)

    • Greg Walker (vocals)




    Recording: 1976 at Wally Heider Recording Studios, San Francisco, by Fred Catero and David Rubinson

    Production: David Rubinson & Friends, Inc.




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Dance Sister Dance (Baila Mi Hermana)
    2. Take Me with You
    3. Let Me
    4. Gitano
    5. Tell Me Are You Tired
    6. Europa (Earth's Cry Heaven's Smile)
    7. Let It Shine
    Santana
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Iberia, Danzas Fantßsticas (Speakers Corner) Iberia, Danzas Fantßsticas (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Iberia, Danzas Fantßsticas (Speakers Corner)

    As in numerous other works by Spanish composers, Isaac AlbÉniz's aim in his Iberia Suite was to portray the landscape and express the zest for life which is so abundant in southern countries. Infused with folkmusic elements, the suite is introduced by the dancelike Evocación which vividly evokes a picture of Iberia. The lush, extravagant harmonies and the stark contrasts of the dynamics in particular - from the softest pianissimo to the extreme fortissimo - certainly whet one's appetite. Don't worry - Spain has a lot to offer! The next movement, El Corpus en Sevilla transports us to Andalusia where a solemn procession is taking place to celebrate the feast of Corpus Christi. This is followed by a sparkling Triana in which the various complex and brilliant rhythms of the national dances Almería, Rondeña and Fandango are ingeniously combined. And the two movements El puerto and El Albaicín are no less exciting: the first presents a rich potpourri of types of Spanish songs, while the second - held in the minor key - conjures up a picture of Granada's gypsy quarter.



    Turina's Danzas fantásticas are noted for their sumptuous orchestration and marked rhythms. A better choice to round off this first-class recording, dedicated to Spanish tradition, is almost impossible to imagine.





    Musicians:



    • Orchestre de la Suisse Romande

    • Ernest Ansermet (conductor)




    Recording: Mai 1960 at Victoria Hall, Geneva by Roy Wallace

    Production: James Walker





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Evocación (Iberia)
    2. El Corpus en Sevilla (Iberia)
    3. Triana (Iberia)
    4. El Puerto (Iberia)
    5. El Albaicín (Iberia)
    6. Exaltación (Fantásticas)
    7. Ensueño (Fantásticas)
    8. Orgia (Fantásticas)
    Issac Albeniz
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Gimme Some Neck (Speakers Corner) Gimme Some Neck (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Gimme Some Neck (Speakers Corner)

    'Gimme Some Neck' - words with a double meaning! Ron Wood's demand for a guitar and/or a bottle serves well to demonstrate both his lifestyle and his commitment to music. On the one side he is a rock'n'roll legend who played his way up the career ladder beginning with the Jeff Beck Group via The Faces to become a member of The Rolling Stones. On the other side we hear a man who was not adverse to the odd drink now and again, but who was a musician through and through, and whose slick hands conjured magical waves of sound on his slide guitar. This sound is brilliantly demonstrated in the opening number I Don't Worry No More, with its bluesy, earthy honky-tonk groove. It is followed by Breakin' My Heart, which gives us a glimpse of Wood's soul by means of sharp organ chords which come from a psychedelic abyss. Then he turns another corner to take us to the gentle, sensitive poetry of Delia with an unamplified guitar.


    Woods presents Buried Alive and Come To Realize with powerful vocals and enough power for a stage performance, and then comes a previously unreleased song by Bob Dylan - Seven Days, in which he sounds more like Big D than D himself. But this is no cover version for Wood's personality is more than alive and kicking. Ron Wood remains Ron Wood - totally distinctive and quite inimitable.

    Musicians:



    • Ron Wood (guitar, vocal, harmonica)

    • Bobby Keys (saxophone)

    • Mick Jagger, Keith Richards (guitar, vocals)

    • Dave Mason (guitar)

    • Ian McLagan (keyboards)

    • Swamp Dogg, Harry Phillips (piano)

    • Mick Taylor (bass, guitar)

    • Mick Fleetwood, Jim Keltner, Charlie Watts (drums)



    Recording: January - March 1978 at Pathe Marconi Studios, Paris, and October - December 1978 at Cherokee Studios, Los Angeles

    Production: Roy Thomas-Baker

    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Worry No More
    2. Breakin My Heart
    3. Delia
    4. Buried Alive
    5. Come To Realise
    6. Infekshun
    7. Seven Days
    8. We All Get Old
    9. F.U.C. Her
    10. Lost And Lonely
    11. Don't Worry
    Ron Wood
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sibelius -  Violin Concerto (Speakers Corner) Sibelius - Violin Concerto (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Sibelius - Violin Concerto (Speakers Corner)

    The violin had got me completely under its spell; for ten years it was my greatest wish to become a great violin virtuoso , confessed Finland's national composer Jean Sibelius in later years. Although he began a career as a violin virtuoso too late, as a composer he profited enormously from his intimate knowledge of the instrument and the possibilities it offered. This is particularly apparent in his Violin Concerto with its wonderful synthesis of virtuosic expression and technical bravura, its classical symphonic form, its outward effects and inner substance. This late-Romantic, brilliantly coloured work is certainly one of the most rewarding for every soloist. A specialist in the field of 19th-century bravura pieces and master of an effortless technique and suppleness, the great American violinist Ruggiero Ricci certainly possessed all the requirements for a brilliant performance of this concerto. And Øivin Fjeldstad is the perfect partner for Ricci in more ways than one in this wonderfully lively recording: thanks to his training as both a conductor and a violinist, he ensures a perfect balance between soloist and orchestra; and as a Norwegian he is, of course, completely au fait with Scandinavian repertoire, and guarantees - both here and in other recordings with the London Symphony Orchestra - a truly nordic touch.





    Musicians:



    • Ruggiero Ricci (violin)

    • London Symphony Orchestra

    • Øivin Fjeldstad (conductor)




    Recording: February 1958 at Kingsway Hall, London by Cyril Windebank

    Production: John Culshaw




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Sibelius-Violin Concerto in D Minor, Op. 47
    2. Tchaikovsky-Serenade Melancolique Op. 26
    3. Scherzo from Souvenir d'm lieu cher, Op. 42
    Oivin Fjeldstad
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brahms - Hungarian Dances (Speakers Corner) Brahms - Hungarian Dances (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Brahms - Hungarian Dances (Speakers Corner)

    Fritz Reiner dedicated himself to the interpretation of works by modern composers such as Richard Wagner, Richard Strauss and BÉla Bartók, and it suited him well to tackle works such as Brahms's Hungarian Dances and Dvorák's Slavonic Dances. These lively compositions require a conductor whose interaction with the orchestra is vivacious and animated. Reiner always demanded utmost concentration and perfection from his ensemble. Under his baton, the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra plays with enthusiasm and without restaint; no trace of a sterile concert atmosphere is found in this recording.



    Reiner's penchant for effects is not irritating, but rather adds highlights which support his highly musical interpretation, indeed one even forgets this trait when listening to the brilliant music.



    From a tonal point of view, the sound is beautifully balanced and reaches the highest standards despite its recording date of 1960 - or maybe just for that reason? The recording is characterized by its brilliance, warmth and vivacity with the result that listening becomes a true musical pleasure.





    Musicians:



    • Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

    • Fritz Reiner (conductor)




    Recording: June 1960 at Sofiensaal, Vienna by James Brown

    Production: Erik Smith





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Johannes Brahms
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brahms - Piano Concerto 1 (Speakers Corner) Brahms - Piano Concerto 1 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Brahms - Piano Concerto 1 (Speakers Corner)

    Brahms originally intended his Piano Concerto No. 1 as a symphony and he extensively reworked his ideas before setting down the work in the form as we know it today. The composer's original intentions still shimmer through however, for the work goes far beyond mere concertante playing and a display of virtuoso brilliance by the soloist. The first movement in particular, with its relentless, threatening main theme, embodies Brahms's dramatic symphonic writing and even a conciliatory secondary theme offers no relief for it too must give way to the heavy, fateful initial theme.



    The passionate and grandiose opening movement is followed by an Adagio full of tranquillity and quiet devotion; the solemn atmosphere is taken to exalted heights by the soloist and orchestra only to fade out pianissimo.
    Although the forceful, belligerent Finale occasionally conjures up the dark powers of the first movement, the work ends in a confident and cheerful vein.
    It is amazing how the sheer presence of the emotions in this composition have been captured on the present DECCA recording from 1962. This is not only true of the gripping interpretation but also of the recording itself which remains transparent and brilliant throughout.



    Musicians:



    • Sir Clifford Curzon (piano)

    • London Symphony Orchestra

    • George Szell (conductor)




    Recording: May/ June 1962 at Kingsway Hall, London by Kenneth E. Wilkinson
    Production: John Culshaw





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor Op. 15

    2. Maestoso

    3. Adagio

    4. Rondo: Allegro non troppo

    Johannes Brahms
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Rachmaninoff - Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner) Rachmaninoff - Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Rachmaninoff - Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner)

    The Second Piano Concerto represents Rachmaninoff's escape from a crisis lasting several years during which he experienced one catastrophe after another. At the suggestion of his psychiatrist, who had prophesied that he would write wonderful music, he turned once again to the work - and it brought him his greatest success to that date. Although the piano writing demands enormous technical dexterity, the composer was apparently not solely aiming at producing a virtuosic showpiece, since the piano part clings snugly to the orchestra like an accompaniment for long stretches, although it does triumph powerfully here and there for good measure.



    Once again, Byron Janis - whose brilliant interpretations of Rachmaninoff's repertory have influenced whole generations of pianists - has made a benchmark recording in which he alagamates tremendous energy with great tranquility. He revels in the late-Romantic ecstatic harmonies, dazzles us with his transparent presentation of the internal structures, and displays great vigour in the weighty themes. The emotional middle movement is also glorious in that Janis enjoys to the full the interplay of passion and reverie with expansive chords and dark-hued tonalities.




    Recording: April 1960 at the Northrop Memorial Auditorium, Minnesota, USA, by C.R. Fine and Robert Eberenz

    Production: Wilma Cozart-Fine and Harold Lawrence




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Opus 18
    Two Preludes For Piano Solo
    E Flat Major, Opus 23, No. 6
    C Sharp Minor, Opus 3, No. 2
    Byron Janis and Minneapolis Symphony
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Liszt Two Piano Concertos (Speakers Corner) Liszt Two Piano Concertos (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Liszt Two Piano Concertos (Speakers Corner)

    Any pianist who tackles Franz Liszts great works must possess outstanding skills in many areas. Technical prowess is absolutely necessary to play the extremely difficult score, as is immense physical energy in order to compete with the hefty onslaughts from the orchestra. But a great awareness of the unusual conceptual forms, refined energy and passion are also required to make the keyboard sing. At the beginning of the Sixties Sviatoslav Richter seemed to possess all these attributes in an ideal equilibrium. With youthful energy he catapulted powerful chords against the First Concertos defiant theme in the orchestra, offering resistance only to join in later with the lyrical maelstrom of the orchestra. In the Second Concerto Richter exchanges heroic brilliance for an elegiac air, then becomes capricious with graceful arpeggios and a lyrical, firm melodiousness that fires the course of the work. In the Finale these twists and turns come together to form an emphatic single strand of spirited theme, brilliant cadenza and blustering orchestra.



    The impressive sound was captured by the highly dedicated Mercury recording team.




    Recording: July 1961 at Walthamstow Assembly Hall, London, by C.R. Fine

    Production: Harold Lawrence




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Concerto No. 1
    2. Concerto No. 2
    Franz Liszt
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP- Sealed Buy Now
  • Two Of A Mind (Speakers Corner) Two Of A Mind (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Two Of A Mind (Speakers Corner)

    Although the beautiful sound, mutual understanding and harmonic balance mostly predominate, the music of alto saxophonist Paul Desmond performing together with baritone saxophonist Gerry Mulligan is far from what one calls 'easy listening'. For many, it is even difficult to identify the melody of evergreens such as Stardust and The Way You Look Tonight. (And what theme is tucked away in Two Of A Mind????)
    The recording in the RCA Victor Studio took place over several days in 1962, and this is why different bass players and percussionists are heard - Wendell Marshall, Joe Benjamin and John Beal each take their turn on the bass, while Connie Kay and Mel Lewis change places behind the drum set. These musicians form a brilliant team, and that there is no piano is both deliberate and inevitable for Gerry Mulligan recordings of the day. By the way, the second saxophonist in The Way You Look Tonight is Paul Desmond - by means of over-dubbing in the middle of the stereo recording!
    The present LP could certainly take a rightful place in a 'Best Of' collection alongside the other recordings by Gerry Mulligan with Ben Webster and Stan Getz.



    Musicians:



    • Gerry Mulligan (bassoon)

    • Paul Desmond (alto saxophone)

    • Joe Benjamin, John Beal, Wendell Marshall (bass)

    • Connie Kay, Mel Lewis (drums)




    Recording: 1962 at RCA Victor's Studio A, New York City by Ray Hall, Bob Simpson and Mickey Crofford

    Production: Bob Prince and George Avakian





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. All the Things You Are
    2. Stardust

    3. Two of a Mind
    4. Blight of the Fumble Bee
    5. The Way You Look Tonight
    6. Out of Nowhere
    Paul Desmond & Gerry Mulligan
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mozart: Mass in C Minor (Speakers Corner) Mozart: Mass in C Minor (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Mozart: Mass in C Minor (Speakers Corner)

    It is not often that incomplete works enjoy great popularity. And it is even rarer that a torso should exercise such great importance in music history, but this is the case with Mozart's Great Mass, K. 427. The C minor Mass is always spoken of as if it were complete: it is spoken of with reverence, eyes looking towards Heaven, lost in the beauty of the music, transported to celestial heights. Mozart combines the compositional style of the Baroque masters with the more modern style of the Viennese Classic. Lofty arioso sections alternate with tremendous choral sections for up to eight parts whose splendid and spectacular timbre broke the bounds of tradition and set new standards for the genre.



    This Mass is, of course, not merely performed but celebrated, as the Berlin RSO under its Principal Conductor Ferenc Fricsay has so admirably demonstrated in this recording. Precise entries, strict tempi, a polished orchestral timbre and vocal soloists so brilliant one might think they were standing in one's own front room lend this recording top marks for musical quality and repertoire value.




    Musicians:



    • Maria Stader

    • Hertha Töpper

    • Ernst Haefliger

    • Ivan Sardi

    • Chorus

    • The Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra

    • Ferenc Fricsay (conductor)




    Recording: September/ October 1967 at the Haus des Rundfunks, Berlin by Werner Wolf

    Production:Otto Gerdes





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $69.99
    Buy Now
    x

    At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress)

    Many critics regard Dave Brubeck's Carnegie Hall concert from February 1963 as his greatest ever live appearance. But who can really determine that? For no one - apart from Brubeck himself - would have seen and heard his conservatively estimated 12,000 concerts.



    Although the twelve titles had already been released on LPs that had been recorded in the studio, these records were certainly not known to all those in the audience. In between the numbers on each LP, Brubeck made little 'advertising spots' in short comments, but with such charm and wit that one really cannot be angry with him.



    The concert programme begins with St. Louis Blues and ends with Take Five. Luckily, the solos are distributed among all the musicians, so that Paul Desmond and Joe Morello - whose prowess on this evening can only be called 'amazingly good' - justifiably received enthusiastic applause from both the audience and us alike. Castilian Drums demonstrates Morello's wealth of ideas and his grandiose feeling for rhythm; though short, Paul Desmond's solos (Southern Scene is a good example!) are compelling, highly melodic, lyrical and possess a unique tone - as such they are immediately recognisable.



    How fortunate that the twelve brilliantly improvised numbers are now available once again on vinyl, having been recorded live at the legendary Carnegie Hall 60 years ago.



    Musicians:



    • Dave Brubeck (piano)

    • Paul Desmond (alto saxophone)

    • Eugene Wright (bass)

    • Joe Morello (drums)


    Recording: February 1963 Carnegie Hall, New York

    Production: Teo Macero



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    St. Louis Blues
    Bossa Nova U.S.A.
    For All We Know
    Pennies From Heaven
    Southern Scene
    Three To Get Ready
    Eleven Four
    King For A Day
    Castillian Drums
    It's A Raggy Waltz
    Blue Rondo A La Turk
    Take Five
    Dave Brubeck
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Belafonte At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner) Belafonte At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Belafonte At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner)

    To perform in Carnegie Hall must surely be the greatest ambition of every artist, regardless of his or her style of music. But it also presents an enormous challenge, because on such an evening 'good' isn't good enough. The artist is not merely expected to perform to his or her usual high standard - the evening must be exceptional. Harry Belafonte, the charismatic and highly experienced performer, certainly managed to fulfil such expectations, as is testified to by the present double album, which has retained its place as a best-seller at the top of the charts over many years.
    This performance contains three acts, as it were: Afro-American moods, Caribbean songs and excursions into music of the world. Belafonte is in top form and celebrates an exciting, sparkling festival of song, including spontaneous comic interludes, which arise from direct interaction with his enthralled and enthusiastic audience. He is brilliantly supported by Bob Corman and his 47-man orchestra, an ensemble which is reduced to a small combo when the maestro raises his husky voice. It goes without saying that all the favourites are there such as Jamaica Farewell, Day-O and Mama Look A Boo Boo, making this Carnegie Hall event one of the most mesmerizing live performances of all time, which captures the essence of the performer in his prime (All Music Guide). With this double album you too can sit in the audience and enjoy this great event.



    Musicians:



    • Harry Belafonte (vocal)

    • Millard Thomas, Raphael Boguslav (guitar)

    • Norman Keenan (bass)

    • Danny Barrajanos (percussion)

    • & orchestra conducted by Robert Corman




    Recording: April 1959 live at Carnegie Hall, New York, by Bob Simpson

    Production: Bob Bollard





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Introduction/Darlin'
    2. Sylvie
    3. Cotton Fields
    4. John Henry
    5. The Marching Saints
    6. The Banana Boat Song (Day-O)
    7. Jamaica Farewell
    8. Mama Look a Boo Boo
    9. Come Back Liza
    10. Man Smart (Woman Smarter)
    11. Hava Nagila (Traditional)
    12. Danny Boy
    13. Cucurrucucu Paloma
    14. Shenandoah
    15. Matilda
    Harry Belafonte
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 2 / Balakirev: Islamey (Speakers Corner) Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 2 / Balakirev: Islamey (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 2 / Balakirev: Islamey (Speakers Corner)

    Rachmaninov's piano works, and in particular his Second Piano Concerto, have fired the enthusiasm of music lovers throughout the world. Dedicated to the psychologist Dr. Nikolai Dahl who had cured the composer of depression, the Second Piano Concerto was given its premiere in Moscow on 10 November 1901 with Rachmaninov himself at the piano and has proved itself to be one of the most successful of its genre among Russian piano repertory. The introduction itself with its powerful sequence of chords rivets the audience's attention and makes each and every listener eager to hear what is yet to come. Katchen's interpretation is particularly impressive for its austere and powerful introduction, but the lyrical passages too - superabundant in this work - are filled with a delightful, dreamy lightness. Tchaikovsky's influence, a Russian soulfulness, and a certain melancholic yearning in the opulent melodies - all are brilliantly portrayed by the pianist. And he finds an ideal partner in the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Sir Georg Solti. Solti proves yet again that he is a master of phrasing and interwoven part-writing; resolutely, with elegance and sharply pointed rhythm, he leads the soloist and orchestra to a brilliant finish.




    Recording: June 1958 at Kingsway Hall, London by Kenneth Wilkinson / Production: John Culshaw





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    Rachmaninov: Concerto No. 2 for Piano and Orchestra / Balakirev: "Islamey" - Julius Katchen, the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Sir Georg So
    Sir Georg Solti
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Chopin & Liszt: Concertos for Piano and Orchestra (Speakers Corner) Chopin & Liszt: Concertos for Piano and Orchestra (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Chopin & Liszt: Concertos for Piano and Orchestra (Speakers Corner)

    The virtuoso concerto is often criticised by audiences chatting in the concert-hall foyer as being superficial and narcistic, but a brilliant soloist performing with a dramatic and sonorous orchestra certainly has no need for excuses. Let's be honest: we all want to enjoy the brilliance and ecstasy of such music. Putting Chopin's brilliant youthful work, with which he took Paris by the storm, alongside Liszt's symphonically structured work with its manifold improvisatory passages is rather like comparing apples and oranges. However, a compilation of the two works on one record is highly desirable, especially when the youthful and athletic Martha Argerich is at the keyboard. She lends Chopin's dominant piano part elegance, pearly lightness, and brings out his exquisite harmonies to create haunting poetry in music.



    Just as effortlessly she brings the sharp contrasts between lyrical airiness and extreme tension to perfection in Liszt's E flat major concerto. With shivers running down the spine, one eagerly awaits Argerich playing the forceful passages, where her complete control is particularly evident in the phenomenal chordal passages.



    Recording: Feburary 1968 at Walthamstow Townhall, London by Heinz Wildhagen

    Production: Rainer Brock



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    FrÉdÉric Copin: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1
    Franz Liszt: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1
    Martha Argerich and the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Claudio Abbado
    Claudio Abbado
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Handel - Water Music - Fireworks Music (Speakers Corner) Handel - Water Music - Fireworks Music (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Handel - Water Music - Fireworks Music (Speakers Corner)

    Composed in the spirit of the Baroque, the Water Music and Royal Fireworks Music were written by the highly regarded George Frideric Handel on commissions from Kings George I and George II of England.



    The remarkable première of the Water Music - a suite of instrumental airs, fanfares, dances, and other delights - was played in 1717 by musicians in a barge who entertained the King and his entourage on a banquet held on board the royal barge which travelled up and down the river Thames. According to reports at the time, Handel's new work was greeted with unanimous acclaim.



    Music appeared equally fitting for the solemn but festive commemoration of a peace treaty. The Royal Fireworks Music - originally scored for brass, oboes and bassoons, plus timpani and the bizarre serpent horn - was composed in 1749 for the victory gala in London's Green Park celebrating the Peace of Aix-La-Chapelle.



    In both pieces Georg Szell and the London Symphony Orchestra conjure up the full splendour of baroque tonality. Orchestra and conductor are clearly in a festive mood. The strings show rare form, lush and radiant. The brass are brilliant but never shrill. The atmosphere is transparent, the spatial effects are impressive.



    For the outstanding quality of this recording we are indebted not least to its inspired recording engineer, Kenneth E. Wilkinson.






    Musicians:



    • London Symphony Orchestra

    • George Szell (conductor)




    Recording: August 1961 at Watford Town Hall, Watford by Kenneth E. Wilkinson
    Production: John Culshaw





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Georg Szell with the London Symphony Orchestra
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Lalo: Symphonie Espagnole / Ravel: Tzigane (Speakers Corner) Lalo: Symphonie Espagnole / Ravel: Tzigane (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Lalo: Symphonie Espagnole / Ravel: Tzigane (Speakers Corner)

    Whenever the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande and Ernest Ansermet, their conductor of many years standing, entered the hall for a recording session, all lovers of high quality LPs looked forward to yet another addition to their collection. And when this wonderful ensemble was joined by such a unique artist as Ruggiero Ricci, who had appeared in the Carnegie Hall at the early age of nine, then their joy knew no bounds. The present re-release offers all fans of fiery rhythms and sumptous symphonic sound a wonderful opportunity to revel in a musical treat in audiophile quality.



    Lalo's highly virtuosic and therefore seldom performed Symphonie espagnole glows with a rich sound palette full of southern temperament as only a large orchestra can. Ruggiero Ricci rivets the listener's attention with his pithy tone, his amazing cascades of sound and melancholy gypsy melodies.
    For all those who cannot get enough of Ricci's captivating playing, a brilliant encore is provided by Ravel's Tzigane - a true showpiece of 20th-century violin repertory.



    Sheer delight for the ears and the soul - and certainly not limited to fans of virtuoso violin playing.



    Recording: March 1959 at Victoria Hall by Roy Wallace / Production: James Walker





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Allegro non troppo (Lalo)
    2. Scherzando- Allegro molto (Lalo)
    3. Intermezzo (Lalo)
    4. Andante (Lalo)
    5. Rondo (Allegro) (Lalo)
    6. Tzigane (Ravel)
    Ernest Ansermet
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Out of the Afternoon (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) Out of the Afternoon (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Out of the Afternoon (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress)

    Roy Haynes - despite his 80 years still an active drummer and bandleader - can look back upon an extraordinary career. Almost more than any other drummer, he defined the rhythm of modern playing 'behind the drums'. A role in the background gave him no satisfaction, so it is no wonder that he has more than 30 LPs to his name.



    The present recording, which his Quartet made together with the blind multi-instrumentalist Roland Kirk in Rudy Van Gelder's studio in 1962, is certainly one of his very best. The seven numbers not only offer astounding moments of 'drum talk', and of syncopation carried out with absolute precision, they also offer the main soloist Roland Kirk the opportunity to display his amazing technique of simultaneous performance on some unusual instruments, in Moon Ray for example, or his use of various types of flute in Snap Crackle (see the cover text for further details), and his wealth of ideas in the ballads (If I Should Lose You).



    Perfect recording technique, brilliant arrangements of standard numbers, highly original evergreens, all played by true giants of their respective instruments - what better reasons are there to obtain this fantastic LP with its lavish gatefold sleeve?





    Musicians:



    • Tommy Flanagan (piano)

    • Henry Grimes (bass)

    • Rahsaan Roland Kirk (flute, percussion, tenor saxophone, stritch, manzello)

    • Roy Haynes (drums)




    Recording: May 1962 at Rudy Van Gelder Studios, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., USA, by Rudy Van Gelder

    Production: Bob Thiele





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Moon Ray
    2. Fly Me To The Moon
    3. Raoul
    4. Snap Crackle
    5. If I Should Lose You
    6. Long Wharf
    7. Some Other Spring
    Roy Haynes Quartet
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
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