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  • The Ultimate Collection (Box Set) The Ultimate Collection (Box Set) Quick View

    $59.99
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    The Ultimate Collection (Box Set)

    The Ultimate Collection is curated in conjunction with the band, the 31-track collection features the band's classic songs including Paranoid, Iron Man, War Pigs, N.I.B. and The Wizard as well as choice cuts from their classic albums and is the definitive accompaniment for all Sabbath fans as well as those with a love of hard rock.
    LP 1
    1. Paranoid
    2. Never Say Die
    3. Iron Man
    4. Black Sabbath
    5. Children Of The Grave
    6. Fairies Wear Boots
    7. Changes
    8. Rat Salad


    LP 2
    1. Sweet Leaf
    2. War Pigs
    3. Sabbath Bloody Sabbath
    4. Hole In The Sky
    5. Symptom Of The Universe
    6. Spiral Architect
    7. Rock 'N' Roll Doctor


    LP 3
    1. Dirty Women

    2. Evil Woman, Don't Play Your Games With Me
    3. A Hard Road
    4. Lord Of This World
    5. Into The Void
    6. Behind The Wall Of Sleep
    7. Snowblind


    LP 4
    1. Tomorrow's Dream
    2. The Wizard
    3. N.I.B.
    4. Electric Funeral
    5. Embryo
    6. Killing Yourself To Live
    7. Am I Going Insane
    8. Wicked World
    9. It's Alright

    Black Sabbath
    $59.99
    Vinyl LP Box Set - 4 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Memoirs of a Madman (Picture Disc) Memoirs of a Madman (Picture Disc) Quick View

    $59.99
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    Memoirs of a Madman (Picture Disc)


    Double Vinyl Picture Disc


    MEMOIRS OF A MADMAN serves as a career spanning audio
    release featuring 17 of Ozzy Osbourne's greatest hit singles
    remastered and compiled in one place for the first time in his
    career. This set offers fans of the multi-platinum recording artist,
    Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee and three-time Grammy(r)
    winning singer and songwriter the ultimate collection from Ozzy's
    distinguished solo career.


    Ozzy's ongoing solo career spans four decades - as both a
    successful solo artist and as the lead singer of Black Sabbath - and
    his music is as relevant today as ever; it still resonates daily on TV,
    in movies, on radio and at stadium sports events.


    For all the things Ozzy Osbourne has been known for, Memoirs
    Of A Madman puts the focus squarely on the thing he does best:
    crafting some of the best, most passionate rock and roll of all time.

    LP 1
    1. Crazy Train
    2. Mr. Crowley
    3. Flying High Again
    4. Over the Mountain
    5. Bark At the Moon
    6. The Ultimate Sin
    7. Miracle Man
    8. No More Tears


    LP 2
    1. Mama, I'm Coming Home
    2. Road to Nowhere
    3. Perry Mason
    4. I Just Want You
    5. Gets Me Through
    6. Changes
    7. I Don't Wanna Stop
    8. Let Me hear You Scream
    9. Paranoid (live)

    Ozzy Osbourne
    $59.99
    Vinyl LP Picture Disc - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) Quick View

    $31.99
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    The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl)

    Pressed On Yellow And Black Vinyl

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like Death Rider, The Beast Within, and Raise The Dead already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby Blitz Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.

    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.

    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. It just makes sense for us, reflects D.D. If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing Grinder, the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work.

    One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time, seconds Blitz. Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics.

    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in Come Heavy and Iron Maiden in The Long Road and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.

    Punk is huge for Overkill, confirms Verni. And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world.

    Central to that premise is the incendiary Let's All Go to Hades which is sure to become a pit favourite. This one was a hell of a lot of fun, says Blitz. You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more.

    Adds D.D., It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes.

    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is Our Finest Hour. It's about the recognition of sameness, explains Ellsworth. I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune.

    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like The Long Road. D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.

    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on Our Finest Hour, is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.

    I've had that kind of sound now for a long time, says Verni. There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars.

    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds.

    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.

    That's the strength of the band, explains Blitz. Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization.

    And Ron? He's one-of-a-kind, says Verni. He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it.

    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.

    I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.

    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.

    For sure, says Blitz. One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear.

    This title is not eligible for further discount.

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Daredevil Daredevil Quick View

    $23.99
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    Daredevil

    Green Colored Vinyl


    A transcendent distillation of Seventies rock heaviness and eighties punk aggression...what Black Sabbath would sound like with suntans and a fleet of dune buggies at their disposal...the ultimate desert-rock. - Rolling Stone


    Available again after two years! Fully digitally remastered with the vinyl a luscious green edition. Originally released on the now defunct Bongload label, followed up by a re-issue on Sweet Nothing and now gets a digitally remastered re-issue on the bands own label - At The Dojo.

    1. Trapeze Freak
    2. Tilt
    3. Gathering Speed
    4. Coyote Duster
    5. Travel Agent
    6. Sleestak
    7. Space Farm
    8. Lug
    9. Egor
    10. Wurkin'
    11. Push Button Magic
    Fu Manchu
    $23.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Memoirs of a Madman Memoirs of a Madman Quick View

    $39.99
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    Memoirs of a Madman


    Double 180 Gram Vinyl LP


    MEMOIRS OF A MADMAN serves as a career spanning audio
    release featuring 17 of Ozzy Osbourne's greatest hit singles
    remastered and compiled in one place for the first time in his
    career. This set offers fans of the multi-platinum recording artist,
    Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee and three-time Grammy(r)
    winning singer and songwriter the ultimate collection from Ozzy's
    distinguished solo career.


    Ozzy's ongoing solo career spans four decades - as both a
    successful solo artist and as the lead singer of Black Sabbath - and
    his music is as relevant today as ever; it still resonates daily on TV,
    in movies, on radio and at stadium sports events.


    For all the things Ozzy Osbourne has been known for, Memoirs
    Of A Madman puts the focus squarely on the thing he does best:
    crafting some of the best, most passionate rock and roll of all time.

    LP 1
    1. Crazy Train
    2. Mr. Crowley
    3. Flying High Again
    4. Over the Mountain
    5. Bark At the Moon
    6. The Ultimate Sin
    7. Miracle Man
    8. No More Tears


    LP 2
    1. Mama, I'm Coming Home
    2. Road to Nowhere
    3. Perry Mason
    4. I Just Want You
    5. Gets Me Through
    6. Changes
    7. I Don't Wanna Stop
    8. Let Me hear You Scream
    9. Paranoid (live)

    Ozzy Osbourne
    $39.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Mind Control Mind Control Quick View

    $37.99
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    Mind Control

    Import


    Mind Control (their third full-length album) is set for release in April 2013, following their two debut London sell-out concerts at The Garage. Within it's blood soaked grooves you will hear shocking tales of bizarre desert ceremonies, religious brainwashing and drug inspired mass slaughter!


    Imagine the original Alice Cooper band jamming in a cell with early Black Sabbath and the Stooges, whilst sitting on murder charges and you may get a glimpse into their fuzzed up world of exploding tube amps and cymbal smashing mayhem. However, this enticing act of musical manipulation is merely the icing upon a very sick cake. Mind Control is a concept album with a theme that makes the acts and intentions of the likes of Charles Manson and Jim Jones seem like petty crimes. What makes Mind Control scarier than most albums is that it doesnt seem as sinister on the surface as it really is deep down within the core of its black acid-drenched world of pain and torture.


    The infectious energy surges and pulverizing grooves of Mind Crawler, tell the tale of a man on a mission who has fled from Mount Abraxas after mercilessly murdering all the members of his cult. He rides his motorcycle through the gates of hell and hijacks the weak minds of yet more foolish disciples to join him in his desert hideaway. This is when the real fun and terror truly commences...


    There was no escaping the chained-to-the brain hooks and melodies of first single from the album, Poison Apple, but this was merely a trailer for the real hellish delights now to be bestowed upon the earth. Recorded at the legendary Chapel Studios over an autumnal full moon using the finest western electrical technology, engineer Jim Spencer (Bert Jansch, Robert Wyatt) has perfectly captured the bands live sound of saturated fuzz, mind-bending riffs and 60's vocal harmonies. A wider range of influences can be heard from both music and cinema, but their founding principle of presenting light and darkness still remains. Simple and ragged in all its low life glory, Mind Control is the ultimate expose of killer cult madness and mind manipulation.

    1. Mt. Abraxas
    2. Mind Crawler
    3. Poison Apple
    4. Desert Ceremony
    5. Evil Love
    6. Death Valley Blues
    7. Follow the Leader
    8. Valley of the Dolls
    9. Devils Work
    Uncle Acid & the Deadbeats
    $37.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Tempo Of The Damned (Awaiting Repress) Tempo Of The Damned (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $27.99
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    Tempo Of The Damned (Awaiting Repress)

    First Time On Vinyl In North America


    Limited Edition Of 1,000 Copies


    Double Gatefold Sleeve


    Pressed On Orange & Red Vinyl


    Twelve years after their 1992 studio record, Force Of Habit, Exodus released Tempo Of The Damned, a worthy comeback with crushing riff attacks, merciless drumming and distinctive vocal outbreaks. Strong and fresh, behold a real thrash hurricane, that continues just as if the band has never left the stage, respectively the studio.


    Tom Hunting, Kirk Hammet and Gary Holt founded EXODUS in 1982, shortly after selecting an appropriate singer the band, Paul Baloff, who completed the line up perfectly and bringing the dream to fruition. Within the following year EXODUS gained huge attention in the international underground scene, evolving from an insiders' tip of the tape trading community to a highly popular act. Innovative song writing and explosive live shows made the difference, EXODUS brought Bay Area Thrash to the world and inspired many bands, among them METALLICA, TESTAMENT, DEATH ANGEL and VIOLENCE (respectively MACHINE HEAD).


    In 1983 Kirk Hammet left the band to join METALLICA, and was replaced by Rick Hunolt, and soon after Rob McKillop complimented the mix. The debut Bonded By Blood was released two years later and became a timeless thrash classic still appreciated today. A vast tour with SLAYER and VENOM preceded next thus the name EXODUS spread more and more.


    Shortly before the second album Pleasures Of The Flesh showed up in 1987, Baloff left the band due to personal and musical differences and got replaced by Steve Zetro Souza (ex-LEGACY). The line-up and chemistry was working for the creativity and the subsequent success of the band. With the studio records like; Fabulous Disaster, Impact Is Imminent and Force Of Habit as well as the live album Good Friendly Violent Fun and the compilation Lessons In Violence EXODUS kept on improving their style and promoted their music with a large number of gigs including tours with PANTERA, ANTHRAX, MOTÖRHEAD, BLACK SABBATH, METALLICA, MEGADETH and many others.


    1992 saw the split of EXODUS, affected by stress and personal problems. A short reunion happened 1996 (with their old singer Paul Baloff) with a tour through Europe and North America and the release of the second live record Another Lesson In Violence.


    Another break took place until September 2001 when EXODUS attended the Thrash Of The Titans benefit show featuring LEGACY, ANTHRAX, S.O.D. and DEATH ANGEL. Afterwards the band started writing new material but got adjourned abruptly: Paul Baloff suffered a stroke on 2nd February 2002 and passed away. Back with Souza at the microphone EXODUS continued working and finally finished the recording sessions for the new, ultimate comeback album Tempo Of The Damned in 2003. The comeback of the decade - without any weaknesses or failures Tempo Of The Damned is the Bonded By Blood of the present time. Pure thrash as good as it gets!

    1. Scar Spangled Banner

    2. War Is My Shepherd

    3. Blacklist
    4. Shroud Of Urine

    5. Forward March

    6. Culling The Herd

    7. Sealed With A Fist

    8. Throwing Down

    9. Impaler
    10. Tempo Of The Damned
    Exodus
    $27.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress) The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
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    The Grinding Wheel (Awaiting Repress)

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like "Death Rider," "The Beast Within," and "Raise The Dead" already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby "Blitz" Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.


    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.


    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. "It just makes sense for us," reflects D.D. "If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing "Grinder," the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work."


    "One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time," seconds Blitz. "Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics."


    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in "Come Heavy" and Iron Maiden in "The Long Road" and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.


    "Punk is huge for Overkill," confirms Verni. "And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world."


    Central to that premise is the incendiary "Let's All Go to Hades" which is sure to become a pit favourite. "This one was a hell of a lot of fun," says Blitz. "You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more."


    Adds D.D., "It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes."


    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is "Our Finest Hour." "It's about the recognition of sameness," explains Ellsworth. "I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune."


    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like "The Long Road." D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. "Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.


    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on "Our Finest Hour," is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.


    "I've had that kind of sound now for a long time," says Verni. "There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars."


    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. "Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds."


    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.


    "That's the strength of the band," explains Blitz. "Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization."


    And Ron? "He's one-of-a-kind," says Verni. "He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it."


    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.


    "I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.


    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.


    "For sure," says Blitz. "One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear."

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
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