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  • 3 Years, 5 Months And 2 Days In The Life Of... 3 Years, 5 Months And 2 Days In The Life Of... Quick View

    $24.99
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    3 Years, 5 Months And 2 Days In The Life Of...

    3 Years, 5 Months & 2 Days in the Life Of is the debut album by Arrested Development. It was released in 1992 to widespread critical acclaim and stood in stark contrast to much of the hip hop around at the time. It helped them become the first rap group to win a Grammy for New Artist, and featured hits like 'Tennessee,' 'People Everyday' and 'Mr. Wendel.' Celebrating its 25th anniversary, the album has been reissued on 2 LPs.
    1. Man's Final Frontier
    2. Mama's Always On Stage
    3. People Everyday

    4. Blues Happy

    5. Mr. Wendal

    6. Children Play With Earth
    7. Raining Revolution

    8. Fishin' 4 Religion

    9. Give A Man A Fish

    10. U

    11. Eve Of Reality
    12. Natural

    13. Dawn Of The Dreads
    14. Tennessee

    15. Washed Away
    Arrested Development
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • 3 Years, 5 Months And 2 Days In The Life Of (White Vinyl) 3 Years, 5 Months And 2 Days In The Life Of (White Vinyl) Quick View

    $38.99
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    3 Years, 5 Months And 2 Days In The Life Of (White Vinyl)


    First Pressing Of 2.000 Copies On 180 Gram White Vinyl, Black Vinyl Thereafter


    Includes Insert With Song Lyrics


    Includes The Hits People Everyday, Mr. Wendal And Tennessee


    3 Years, 5 Months & 2 Days in the Life Of... is the debut album by American Hip Hop group Arrested Development, released in 1992. The album's chart success was the beginning of the popularization of Southern Hip Hop.


    The album stood in stark contrast to the gangsta rap that ruled the Hip Hop charts in 1992, in its focus on spirituality, peace and love. It was voted as the best album of the year in The Village Voice Pazz & Jop critics poll. The album's title refers to the length of time it took Arrested Development to get a record contract.


    The album charted at #3 in the UK Charts, and #7 in the Billboard 200. Charting singles that came off the album are People Everyday, Mr. Wendal and Tennessee. The latter song is part of the The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll list.

    1. Man's Final Frontier
    2. Mama's Always On Stage
    3. People Everyday
    4. Blues Happy
    5. Mr. Wendal
    6. Children Play With Earth
    7. Raining Revolution
    8. Fishin' 4 Religion
    9. Give A Man A Fish
    10. U
    11. Eve Of Reality
    12. Natural
    13. Dawn Of The Dreads
    14. Tennessee
    15. Washed Away
    Arrested Development
    $38.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bigger and Blackerer Bigger and Blackerer Quick View

    $24.99
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    Bigger and Blackerer

    Limited Edition Vinyl LP + DVD


    Bigger and Blackerer was taped during two shows, back-to-back on the same evening in Boston, MA. Only by watching the DVD will you learn of Daivid Cross unique relationship with the deaf community, share his canny insights into the editorial machinations behind the Bible, and marvel at how well a bald, middle aged white guy can fill out a pair of jeans. Yet one must listen to the LP in order to hear about gastro-intestinal misadventures with his dog Ollie Red Sox, or sing along with The Sultans Revenge, the swinging, Vegas-style opening number composed by Cross and his good friend Mark Rivers (author of the theme to Mr. Show).


    Bigger and Blackerer is David Cross third album, preceded by Its Not Funny (2004) and Shut Up You Fucking Baby! (2002). The latter was actually nominated for a Grammy Award. Cross was also the first comedian signed to Sub Pop Records, paving the way for Eugene Mirman, Flight of the Conchords, and dozens of other hopeful comics.


    During his illustrious career, David Cross has played recurring roles on the TV programs Arrested Development and The Colbert Report, and won an Emmy Award for his contributions to The Ben Stiller Show. He has also starred in such films as Waiting for Guffman, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, the Bob Dylan fantasy Im Not There (in which he portrayed Allen Ginsberg), and Kung Fu Panda. He is currently working on the UK show The Increasingly Poor Decisions of Todd Margaret (broadcast on IFC in the USA).

    1. Opening Song (The Sultans Revenge)
    2. If You Care
    3. That One Show About Drugs and Stuff
    4. Me and Drugs
    5. Black Stuff
    6. ...Or Worse
    7. Where We Are Now Back in Sept. '09
    8. Silly Religious Crazies
    9. Really Silly Religious Crazies. I Mean, Double, Triple Crazy!
    10. Random Goofabouts
    11. I Can't Get Beer in Me...
    12. Lesson Learned
    David Cross
    $24.99
    Limited Edition Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sky Swimming Sky Swimming Quick View

    $17.99
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    Sky Swimming

    Amelia Rivas and Christian Pinchbeck don't just sing about feverish, frayed and fractured romances - in the three years since forming elephant, they've been living one.


    It's fitting that sky swimming, their debut full length release is a seductive, night time delight of an album. After all, it was in the twilight hours of a may morning three years ago that Pontefract native Amelia Rivas and Bristolian Christian Pinchbeck met at a house party and in alcohol-soaked all-nighter sessions that sky swimming was written.


    A fibrous collection of songs about relationships - their own included, which broke down during the making of the album - hazy memories, twisted dreams, the metaphysical bleeding in to the physical - sky swimming - all trilling keyboards, swooping melodies, broken hip hop beats, looped strings and Amelia's uniquely curvy vocals - that makes you want to clamp your headphones tighter on your ears, letting you swim in its every detail and emotion. Influenced by everything from Toro y Moi to composer Angelo Badalamenti, everything but the girl to rap originators arrested development and Joe Meek's productions, it's an intensely varied listen.


    "the first time we worked together, I went round to his house in Peckham and didn't leave for 3 days. I barely knew him," Amelia remembers. "She turned up with some £10 casio she bought from a charity shop in France and the whole demo EP was made on that," recalls Christian. Elephant have grown beyond their lo-fi roots since then, with Andy Dragazis being drafted in on co-production duties, while retaining the emotional rawness of those early songs. Tracks vary from psyche-delving ballads about growing up - torn tongues and skyscraper ("I want to understand what's wrong with my brain," Rivas laughs), to the thrilling pop of elusive youth, a eulogy to a friend who "wears a city crown", to the everyday trials of being young and poor in London (see ants about Amelia's crumbling tooting bedsit and TV dinner, a paean to rubbish telly and cheap booze) and the heartbreaking title track sky swimming written in the eye storm of their relationship meltdown with the refrain "do your eyes turn blue before you cry, I see the blue in you".


    With winning appearances at Primavera and Eurosonic festivals behind them, not to mention support slots with cult hero Matthew E. White, under their belts, Elephant have in Sky Swimming one of the year's most seductive sounds. . "I flew to the moon to mirror you" sings Amelia on album closer Shapeshifter, with the sort raw melancholy that could only be cribbed from a blue valentine romance. "I saw the future." It should be a very bright future ahead for Elephant indeed.

    1. Assembly
    2. Skyscraper
    3. Allured
    4. Ants
    5. Elusive Youth
    6. Shipwrecked
    7. Torn Tongues
    8. Come To Me
    9. TV Dinner
    10. Sky Swimming
    11. Golden
    12. Shapeshifter
    Elephant
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • There's A Riot Goin' On (45 RPM) There's A Riot Goin' On (45 RPM) Quick View

    $49.99
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    There's A Riot Goin' On (45 RPM)

    Ranked 99/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

    Sly And The Family Stone There's A Riot Goin' On 180 gram 45RPM 2LP from ORG Music


    Inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1999 & Ranked #99 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums Of All Time!


    More than four decades after they first stormed the Pop and R&B charts in the winter of 1968 with "Dance To the Music" - a groundbreaking jam that has the distinction of being chosen for the Grammy Hall Of Fame, the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame's 500 Songs That Shaped Rock, and Rolling Stone magazine's 500 Greatest Songs Of All Time - the music of Sly and the Family Stone is more vital than ever.


    The band's catalog (every single composition penned by Sylvester Stewart aka Sly Stone) includes their three career-defining RIAA gold Billboard #1 Pop/ #1 R&B smashes, "Everyday People," "Thank You (Falletinme Be Mice Elf Again)" and "Family Affair," and their signature Top 40 hits that began with "Dance To the Music" and went on to include "Stand!," "Hot Fun In the Summertime," "Runnin' Away," "If You Want Me To Stay," "Time For Livin', and more.


    Those songs not only inspired an era of youthful rebellion and independence, but also had a potent effect on the course of modern music in general. A dazzling fusion of psychedelic rock, soul, gospel, jazz, and Latin flavors, Sly's music brought the next step - funk - to a disparate populace of hip artists. From Miles Davis and Herbie Hancock, to the halls of Motown and George Clinton's P-Funk, from Michael Jackson and Curtis Mayfield, down the line to Bob Marley, the Isley Brothers, Prince, Public Enemy, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Arrested Development, the Black Eyed Peas, the Roots, OutKast and on and on, Sly's DNA is traceable to every cell of the musical stratosphere.


    Since it took almost two years to make, the fifth album by bonafide superstars Sly and the Family Stone had everyone salivating in anticipation. Needless to say, Sly did not disappoint! 1971's There's A Riot Goin' On finds the Bay Area-based genius getting funkier than ever before, even as his artistic vision becomes progressively darker. Some may have been disappointed that Sly didn't simply re-create the chart successes of earlier singles, but who can argue with the flat-out brilliance of turning recent big hit Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin) on its head to create the mind-boggling Thank You For Talkin' To Me Africa.


    Two of this hypnotic album's best tunes Family Affair and Runnin' Away were gigantic chart hits, and There's A Riot Goin' On hit #1 Pop/ #1 R&B within a few weeks of its release in November, proving beyond any shadow of a doubt that Sly Stone could totally deliver the goods! A transformative masterpiece, There's A Riot Goin' On was inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1999, and is ranked #99 on Rolling Stone magazine's '500 Greatest Albums Of All Time.'

    Luv N' Haight

    Just Like A Baby

    Poet

    Family Affair

    Africa Talks To You The Asphalt Jungle

    There's A Riot Goin' On
    Brave & Strong

    (You Caught Me) Smilin'

    Time

    Spaced Cowboy

    Runnin' Away

    Thank You For Talking To Me Africa
    Sly & The Family Stone
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl 45 RPM LP- 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Falling Faster Than You Can Run (Awaiting Repress) Falling Faster Than You Can Run (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $18.99
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    Falling Faster Than You Can Run (Awaiting Repress)

    Well, it doesn't take long for Falling Faster Than You Can Run to reveal that Nathaniel Rateliff isn't in a very good place. His deep funk is revealed very quickly on the opening track 'Still Trying': "If you roll in it long enough/your shit won't even smell" sings Rateliff, in between crying out, unaccompanied, "I don't know/I don't know/a god damned thing".


    And that's the feeling that sticks throughout this, often very fine, new record from Denver, Colorado's Missouri-born Rateliff. On his second full-length album (dropping the & the Wheel from his name) loneliness is writ large: not the kind of loneliness from actually being along, but the kind that comes from being constantly surrounded by people yet unable to shake the feeling of complete isolation. Rateliff has toured with many, many acts over the past few years and most recently has spent time with Dr Dog and fellow Denver act (and friends) The Lumineers. Thankfully, Rateliff rarely sounds like his friends (you might say I'm not a fan) and instead writes and plays music with a lot of heart and soul. It's often his voice that's the star of the show thanks to the subtly-arranged instrumentation: part matured Kurt Wagner burr and part throat-ravaged bluesman ( a bit The Tallest Man on Earth) it's a voice you could listen to all day. But good voice is nothing without good songs, and Rateliff comes with plenty of ammunition on Falling Faster Than You Can Run.


    "Still Trying" is an arresting opener; while Rateliff's heart-wrenching roars are the highlight, the backing isn't too shabby either - acoustic guitar and bass drum battle for the spotlight on a ragged country song, and it sounds authentic, like Rateliff has lived what he's singing. And things get better quickly: "I Am" is mostly just Rateliff and his guitar, as broaches his isolation singing: "you'll never know what's buried there / less you dig around". The music swells as he sings the title over and over, following a similar pattern to the album opener. But before things get too familiar, Rateliff picks up the pace with a couple of full band numbers that could almost be considered jaunty, if we were to ignore the lyrics. "Don't Get Too Close" is fine enough and ticks over nicely like a quickstep, but "Laborman" is even better. Like Wilco at their poppiest, it flies off on crunchy and bright electric guitars which belies the lyrical content: "I got a feelin' / a sleepin' depression / that somebody's gonna get hurt", sings Rateliff, followed by "you got the harness/so where you gonna drag me now?" You can see a pattern developing here; Rateliff's stuck somewhere he doesn't want to be, lonely, but how does he get out of it? Take another look at that album cover too - a couple share a bed, an arm reaches out yet it doesn't touch the other person. It's basically a visual encapsulation of what's being sung about.


    The epic electric storm of "Forgetting Is Believing" leads a trio of great closing tracks, ending with the Lambchop-murmur of the title track. Rateliff's baritone is exposed and dusty as he sings "leave me alone/you can see me fall/faster than you can run", ending as he started the record - alone and isolated.


    Falling Faster Than You Can Run feels, through the dirt, the shit and the whisky, and despite the loneliness, like a hard-earned triumph for Nathaniel Rateliff.


    - Andrew Hannah (The Line Of Best Fit)

    1. Still Trying
    2. I Am
    3. Don't Get Too Close
    4. Laborman
    5. How To Win
    6. Nothing To Show For
    7. Right On
    8. Three Fingers
    9. Forgetting Is Believing
    10. When Do You See
    11. Falling Faster Than You Can Run
    Nathaniel Rateliff
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Terrestrials (Awaiting Repress) Terrestrials (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $16.99
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    Terrestrials (Awaiting Repress)


    Thick Stock Cardboard Stoughton Style Tip On Jacket


    180 Gram Vinyl


    Limited To 3,000


    Four figures stand atop a summit, staring east out over a vast, frostbitten wasteland, the black sun dwindling in the west, casting their shadows across the plain. They await another clan, legendary for their slow approach. Eyes on the horizon, searching, patiently, for some signal of the arrival, some plume of smoke that would announce that the time had come. At last, at the edge of the plane, they note a black banner, and soon two hooded figures appear in the dusk. A horn sounds, and drumbeats echo through the valley.


    It's only the threshold of the distant horizon that limits the scope of Terrestrials, but like much of Earth, its landscape is arid, only disclosing its secrets upon active contemplation of its component dust. From the opening strains, hidden at the foot of a vertiginous crescendo from zero decibels, the album recalls a technique of Andrei Tarkovsky's, later developed in the films of BÉla Tarr. The eight-and-a-half-minute opening shot in Tarr's epic Sátántangó laterally tracks cattle carefully plodding through a dilapidated commune in search of food from muddy pasture. As the audience investigates the frame for clues to Tarr's purpose, he slowly reveals to them a symbolic vision of the film as a whole, inviting contemplation of the rich surfaces of the decayed buildings and the labyrinthine entrapment of the commune's inhabitant kine, some playing at leadership and some dragging their feet, cow and human alike awaiting deliverance by a dark messiah. Terrestrials proceeds in a remarkably similar fashion. As each track unfurls, its glacial pace arrests the listener's search for novelty, forcing attention to the profundities of the mix and the texture that the interlaced sounds create; and yet it also deepens the desire for what each step forward promises, the crisis that the procession patiently unveils.


    Terrestrials features more complex instrumentation than most of the works of either party. Sunn O)))'s deep bass and endlessly sustained guitar feature heavily on each track of Terrestrials, but so do Ulver's electronics and a myriad of additions, including trumpets, didgeridoo, and strings. Although the tracks apparently began as a set of improvisations recorded at Ulver's Oslo studio, the vast scope of the release clearly evolved out of the various mixing and arrangement sessions helmed by Ulver's Kristoffer Rygg and Sunn O)))'s Stephen O'Malley between 2008 and 2012. Here they achieved a synthesis that stylistically transcends the mere combination of the two groups and their traditional pathways, with Ulver sealing up the cracks of Sunn O)))'s immense backdrop and heightening the atmosphere with tense strings, sculpted textures, and insistent rhythm. It's this attention to the subtleties that renders Terrestrials monolithic; they ensure that each tick of the clock yields an array of sonic qualities, each progressing slowly in themselves but together moving the whole mass of sound forth at a constant click.


    From the trumpets on "Let There Be Light" to the drum-like pound of the bass and didgeridoo in "Western Horn," Terrestrials relentlessly heralds its own arrival, an endless parade slouching towards Bethlehem. By the time Rygg's vocals enter at the middle of "Eternal Return," the crawling pace of the album has ensured their sublimity. Taken on its own, this short section would scarcely justify a song unto itself; it emerges out of the sudden but carefully orchestrated resolution of the murky depths of the track's recesses, manifesting as a piercing clarity and a distillation of the album's theme of annunciation. Its lyrics, rich in spite of their brevity, conceal a messianic yearning in the fallow desert, a hope for deliverance from the stasis of the Egyptian yoke and the confusion of exile, and a dark prophecy of a "liminal animal" with "golden nature" of the sinful calf. Rygg urges us to "listen silent."


    Gongs or guitars ring out. This final stage of Terrestrials heralds a return of an immense mystery. What approaches, its lumbering gait constantly pressing onward, can't divulge its nature until it finally arrives. The quintessential figure of doom is an immense behemoth, a force of nature whose sublime shadow conceals it from view even as its thundering steps reveal its impending advent. But here we lie in wait. Terrestrials delivers on its persistent promise by offering another transcendental promise of a future culmination. But the restraint they exert in their advance to the beautiful oasis at the center of "Eternal Return" suggests that, here, Sunn O))) and Ulver are more interested in the process as it happens through time, tracking the march of the sun across the heavens, marking each moment as it slips back into eternity.


    - Matthew Philips (Tiny Mix Tapes)

    1. Let There Be Light
    2. Western Horn
    3. Eternal Return
    Sunn O))) & Ulver
    $16.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
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